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Date: Tuesday, 22 Sep 2009 18:11

We’ve recently moved our blog to http://blog.disqus.com. We’re currently in the process of transitioning all the posts from here over to the new site.

Cheers,

-Giannii

Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Tuesday, 08 Sep 2009 19:48

Disqus Profile is not another social media account. Rather it’s the universal management tool for commenters and the most efficient way to integrate all your different online identities.

Under Connections you can pre-authenticate your Twitter, Facebook, or Open ID and reblog your comments across multiple services such as Tumblr, Wordpress, Movable Type, and Typepad.

If you’ve commented before using Twitter, Facebook, or OpenID without a Disqus account, now all your comments will be automatically merged once connected.

Also add your Twitter and Facebook Avatars to your profile.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
help@disqus.com
@Disqus

Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Tuesday, 01 Sep 2009 17:53

Within our new Moderation Panel we’re made several enhancements for ease of use and to moderate without having to visit several pages. Below is a brief walkthrough of a few methods you can use to help manage your sites.

Sorting & filtering your comments can help you keep track of your conversations on a global scale. Using the filter by status option located on the right side of the panel, you can easily jump through each category.

These options are most frequently used to moderate your comments with batch actions. You can easily expand any comment by simply clicking the title or by using the expand/collapse all options at the top of the dashboard.

When performing batch actions you’ll have three options available to you; Approve, Mark Spam, & Delete. Remember to Mark Spam as spam instead of using Delete, if you just delete a comment our spam filters will not be notified.

Searching comments for common words used by trolls/spammers to moderate all their comments in one go. You can find the search box right above the filtering options.

If a spammer is persistent and continues to plague your site even though you’ve clicked mark spam. The quickest way to resolve this problem is to blacklist his username, email, & ip address. You can do this by clicking the face of their avatar.

If you happen to come across a set of comments from a known/trusted commenter, you can also whitelist their profile so you won’t have to worry about approving their comments again. Be sure to do this only for trusted commenters.

Replying to comments inline within the new moderation panel is fast & simple. You’ll never lose your place whilst moderating multiple comments. Editing undesirable content is the same process except you choose edit button instead.

Closing threads is simple, on the right side of the panel above search click view threads. You can choose to close & delete threads from that page.

If you have any questions be sure to check out the frequently asked questions section before emailing help.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
help@disqus.com
@Disqus
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Tuesday, 25 Aug 2009 21:43

Version 3 is our biggest release since Disqus launched. In many ways, we went back to the drawing board for this version. Many of these changes and additions comes from the culmination of everything we’ve learned about how people use Disqus and approach comments on the web.

We’ve always had two distinct sets of users: publishers who use the comment system on their sites, and the people who use their Disqus profile to comment. For quite a while, we’ve had to speak to two different audiences when building this service. Essentially, we were offering two related, but still different, services.

With this release, we’re relaunching as two different services: Disqus Comments and Disqus Profile. Disqus Comments is what you already know us for: a fully featured comment system and community tool. The reality is that there are many logins you can use when you comment (Facebook, Twitter) and Disqus Comments is agnostic to the login type. Disqus Profile, the other service, is not another profile but rather a comment manager for commenters. It’s a way to manage all the different identities you use and the comments attached to those.

Disqus’ new look and interface was a deliberate way for us to become more accessible for a wider range of publishers and commenters. Thanks to David Cole for his great work.

So what’s new besides the branding and aesthetics? Plenty. We’ll be doing a series of posts introducing new features starting this week. In this post, I’ll point out some larger changes that you can check out today:

Comment System

You’re likely most interested in what’s new with the actual comment system. We’ve released a new default theme, which better adapts to sites and is designed to provide a smoother user experience.

  • Real-time posting and updating. We’ve implemented posting and updating the comment thread without having to reload the page.
  • Reaction is our feature that aggregates comments and other mentions of your post and displays them with your comments. This enables a true social, distributed discussion — with this release, Reactions are now faster and more reliable. Our aggregated results are powered by uberVU.com and Backtype.com.

What sets Disqus Comments apart from other systems is its flexibility and comprehensiveness in features. We’re proud to be offering a full engine for handling discussion with deep tools, rather than just a novelty social widget.

  • New moderation panel. We started from scratch to make it the best way to moderate both large and small volumes of comments. Partially inspired by an email inbox, it was built to cut down on the amount of time spent on moderation.
  • Improved automated tools, including a new spam filter and new ways to combat abusive language in comments.
  • Other improved moderation tools such as multi-site moderation, multiple moderators, blacklists and whitelists.
  • New theme customization options, such as the ability to set default avatar pictures for your site. These features are meant to give you better integration with your site.

The brand new Disqus Profile is being refocused as a tool to help commenters take back control of their comments.

  • With this release, all profiles have vanity URLs. You can now access your public profile by going to disqus.com/{your username}
  • Connect and merge services to your profile. You can enable the option to automatically share your comments on Facebook, Twitter, and other services.
  • Disqus will now find comments that we think may be yours, and ask you if you’d like to merge or reject them.
  • Full shared control with publishers. You have the ability to edit and delete comments without impacting the site that the comment is on.
Author: "Daniel" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 14 Aug 2009 20:26

Where are you from?

I was born in Encarnación and I grew up there. Encarnacion is a city bordering Argentina; it is united with the San Roque Gonzalez of Santa Cruz Bridge

What did you dream of becoming as a kid?

I have always dreamed of becoming a fashion designer. My friends have always asked me to modify their clothes when I was in college. Since they knew my family was in fashion and design of jeans, they always confided in my criticism.

Where did you learn how to do all of this?

I’ve learned a majority of things from my family, specifically my mother and I also study garment design in my country. My goal is to have the title of garment designer and to  launch my own brand of clothes entitled GiannyL. I will start with my own line of jeans.

Where did you get the idea for your site?

In 2008, my friends told me about so many people making instructional videos on YouTube and all around the web. They know how I much I love to make my own clothing so I made a video of making a dress using an old T-shirt. I couldn’t believe the amount of views and responses. I love to play with my Mac so I decided to make a website with all DIY videos to show my work.

When are you launching your fashion brand?

I’m continually working and hoping by December if everything goes well. I want to sell via online but I am painfully organizing the payment system. Paraguay is not in the list of countries that can use Paypal so I am looking at an alliance with an enterprise so that I may do it. But I have already registered my brand and I am finishing 3 designs of embroidered jeans.

Do you specialize in Men’s or Woman’s wear?

The first designs will be for women, but I won’t leave out designing for men; I like both. =)

Where did you first hear about Disqus?

My favorite social news site is Mashable uses it and after seeing it there I installed it on my site, I enjoy using Disqus.

What’s your favorite Disqus feature?

Being able to use Twitter and Facebook credentials to login and the ease of interacting with others who comment.

What would you like to see Disqus develop next?

The possibility of having two Disqus accounts on my site, one in Spanish and the other English and that they

What do your parents think about your website?

They are very proud of me.

Where did the name Giannyl come from?

My full name is Giannina Lezcano and my friends call me Gianny, so I put together Gianny + L. =)

Also Giannyl likes to pull the occasional prank on friends like I do:

To learn more about Giannyl check out her website, twitter, and Disqus Profile.

As a small side note, Feature Friday will not be posted next week but returning August 28th.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Wednesday, 05 Aug 2009 18:19

For some people, I won’t need to point these issues out. They already know where it is and they’ve been shouting about it. I hear you.

Increase in spam

We’re seeing an increase in a couple different types of spam lately. Sometimes it’s your straightforward, anonymous spammers. We can catch that easily. Recently, Disqus users have been victims to blackhat spammers who spend some time to leave legitimate comments, only to sign off with a suspicious link hawking designer sunglasses. We’ve gone through a handful of different spam handlers. We’re not entirely happy with what we have going on right now.

And last week, our spam handling went down for a short while which created a large backlog of unprocessed spam comments. This didn’t help things at all.

But, there is a solution. We’ve been working on our own Disqus anti-spam that we will be launching soon. It’s too early to report on its total effectiveness, but tests are looking very good.

Database issues

The last two days, our main database server hasn’t been up to snuff. We’ve been doing a lot of patching and fixing along the way, but there is a more permanent solution that we’re still scrambling to finish. Disqus needs to be reliable at all times, and sudden outage spurts aren’t acceptable.

Author: "Daniel" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 31 Jul 2009 16:57

Disqus had an outage this morning that lasted over 30 minutes. Sorry about that. Here’s what happened:

Our proxy server’s network was taken down by an automated system that detected DDoS. Translation: a machine that is especially important to the service was taken offline because some software thought there was an attack on the network (distributed denial of service).

Our hosting provider let us know that this was a mistake. There was no attack and the automated software should not have taken the machine offline. After a bit of confusion, everything was properly restored.

The main lesson for us here is that, regardless of the reason, mishaps are mishaps, and an important machine shouldn’t cause an outage in the service. We understand that. This is actually happening at a time when we are making large moves around redundancy and eliminating single points of failure. This basically means that we are making sure something like this, while it could happen again, won’t impact the reliability and performance of the service.

We always update our Twitter account on the latest happenings; follow us at twitter.com/disqus

Author: "Daniel" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 24 Jul 2009 21:13

Where did you grow up?

I’m originally from Oregon, I was born in a little town south of Oregon called Corvallis.

What did you dream of becoming as a kid?

I’ve honestly dreamed of becoming a musician since I was five years old. When I was five years old I started playing drums and I’ve never really wanted to do anything but that. Much to my dad’s dismay they wanted me to play piano and even bought a piano for the house but I would just bang on it. I was kind of a one track minded kid. One day when I was ten I came home and wanted to play the piano and my dad just about shot himself in the face.

Did you actually play drums or pots and pans?

Yeah, I started with pots and pans. Both of my parents were professional musicians and there was always band gear setup in some part of our house. I think I got started on their drummers drums in our basement but eventually they got tired of buying new kitchen equipment and bought me a drum set.

What kind of instruments do your parents play?

My dad is a bass guitar, accordion, and pedal steel player, lots of blue grass instruments. My mom is an incredible singer and in her younger years she was a drummer. I think it was sort of hereditary that I became a percussionist.

What was your first real step into the music industry?

I played professionally in bands since I was about thirteen years old. So I guess on a regional level I was making money at it since I was thirteen. My dad would take me to the gigs and of course they were all twenty one and over gigs. During the breaks I would have to leave the building because it was illegal. While waiting for the breaks to be over my dad would take me outside and we would eat burgers on the his hood of his car. When I graduated from high school I went on tours with several bands playing rock shows and arenas. After that I moved to Los Angeles from Oregon for the specific purpose of getting into film. I’ve always been a huge fan of film music.

My first real job in television was being the principal composer for Monday Night Football during the 2002-2004 seasons on ABC Sports. That was a huge break because I got acquainted very quickly with how to write for television and to turn it around in days. So that was really where I really cut my teeth. I began to do more production work after that composing music for Entertainment Tonight and several other sports shows. I did a lot of stuff like that when starting out and it really helped me hone my productions skills.

What’s the most memorable score that you’ve composed?

It seems like your favorites are always the most recent, I just finished a movie score called “The Way Home” and I had a great orchestra performing the music. That was a ton of fun. I was commissioned by the Olympic Committee to create themes for the US Olympic Swim Team during Michael Phelps gold medal run. I did a number of themes for the telecast last year and those were a lot of tough nights of writing because we kept winning. It was a great honor to be able to do something for the Olympics. When I was a kid John Williams themes were off the charts.

I’m also a studio drummer playing for several artists including Tina Tuner, Chris Cornell, and Kenny Loggins. I’ve just had the opportunity to do some really fun stuff.

Where did you hear about Disqus?

We built our blog for ScoreCast and at the time we used the blogger comment system. One of our readers said “Your guys comments suck, we can’t figure out how to login etc”. We basically said “tell us what we don’t know” and someone mentioned Disqus. Our webguy Jai Meghan looked into it and Disqus was the most clearly outline format as far as people being able to find stuff and getting registered with our community. The community page is great page as we’re a community of composers, orchestrators, contractors, and musical players. That’s really what Scorecast is about building community and trying to get the community to grow smaller as it get larger if that makes any sense. Disqus has really helped us do that.

What’s Scorecast Online?

Scorecast started in 2006 with my assistant. I would receive emails from aspiring film composers asking questions “How do I make the transition into film music?” and instead of trying to email all these people back getting bogged down with that, I started doing the podcast.

Someone wrote to me from NYU considering  our podcast as recommended listening resource for students. I realized that I needed to stop goofing off and get serious. I asked my friend Lee Sanders that does all the music for the Amazing Race if he would help out and we created Scorecast Online. We call it the virtual hangout for the musical creative. Basically we have a team of twenty five musical composers that write articles daily. It’s kind of a electronic news paper by people in the industry. It’s not really a fan sites but a resource if you’re really serious about getting into the film music.

What’s your favorite Disqus feature?

I really dig the Facebook Connect as I’m a big Facebooker. I appreciate not having to have eighty diffetent screenames to gain access. Just being able to login with my Facebook account and having everything integrated is nice. I really like how clean your system is.

If you could add anything to Disqus, what would you add?

I can’t think of anything I would add to the Disqus system.

When is the last time you composed music for yourself?

Oh man, that’s a sore subject. I don’t get the chance to do that quite a bit as most of what I do is written to picture. For the first time in a very long time I was commissioned to write a symphony and it’s a charity based thing to raise some money for kids in the town where I grew up in Oregon. I’m excited about that as I’ve not written anything independent of film in eight years. This will be an interesting exercise in freedom.

To learn more about Deane visit his twitter, website or Disqus Profile.

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 17 Jul 2009 20:44

What do you do for a living?

My twin brother and I founded Wolfire Games, an independent video game studio. We’ve been working hard for the past year along with three other guys to build Overgrowth — the ninja rabbit fighting game.

What type of audience would overgrowth appeal too?

Overgrowth is a pretty unique game. At its core, it is about free movement and fighting. You can play it carefully, sneaking around and carefully breaking people’s spines by slamming them into the ground from behind. Or you can just run into the fray and just brawl with as many guys as you can take. There are not very many controls, but you can improvise awesome moves, for example, jumping over someone’s head and kicking them into a group of enemy wolves, causing them to get knocked into sharp rocks.

I think fans of violent, action games will have a great time with Overgrowth. Squeamish people, not so much.

How long did Overgrowth take to develop compared to your other titles?

We’re approaching the one year mark of five dedicated guys working full time on it. We also have a number of amazing contributors, for instance, Ryan Gordon working on the Linux build, and Mikko Tarmia working on music for us. We’re taking it really seriously.

Lugaru, on the other hand, was built in maybe a couple summers, single-handedly by my brother during high school.

What engine does your game run on?

We are very proud that we’ve built our own engine from the ground up — we call it the Phoenix Engine. It’s a huge, huge investment of resources to do this and the vast majority of games use a pre-built game engine.

The advantage of our engine is that we can custom tailor everything for Overgrowth. Overgrowth is truly built from the ground up to be a ninja rabbit fighting game. Everything about the procedural animation system to the map editor has been tailored specifically for Overgrowth, and I hope that this will show in the final game.

What inspired you to create a game company? Was it from just being a gamer or some other influence?

My twin brother and I have been interested in video games since before I can remember. We’ve been interested in making games pretty much since we started playing them. When we were maybe seven years old, we actually mailed a letter to Lucas Arts, the creators of Monkey Island, asking if we could work on video games for them. They respectfully declined — but we were determined.

My brother is kind of a programming natural and actually started making video games, really, really early. He started making HyperCard games in maybe second grade, then moved on to BASIC games, and then progressed to full fledged, 3D games in high school. After he graduated college, we decided to make Wolfire official and start seriously developing games.

How many games has Wolfire released?

Overgrowth will technically be the 5th game, however, it will be Wolfire’s first “serious” game. The level of technology, quality, and the sheer amount of time and effort we are putting into Overgrowth dwarfs all of Wolfire’s other games combined.

When did you first hear about Disqus?

I heard about it right when you guys were getting started from my roommate who went to highschool with the founders. I finally got around to installing it on the Wolfire Blog and I was extremely impressed.

What’s your favorite feature within Disqus?

The most valuable to me is the threading and organization of the comments.  That has transformed the comment section of our daily blog from an unreadable mess into awesome conversations, where 100 comments is not unusual.

My favorite feature is probably Facebook Connect. Its awesome for Facebook users to not even have to sign in. I don’t really know how they do it but if you click the Facebook button, it just works!

If you could add one feature to Disqus, what would it be?

I think the next step is smart social media reactions. My dream feature would be to have Reddit, Digg, Facebook, and Twitter buttons at the top of the comments so that people could Digg, Tweet, etc. my blog posts without leaving the page, and with the click of a single disclosure triangle, could view the comments from Reddit, or people’s tweets, without them mixing in with my blog comments.

After Overgrowth is released, are there any other big titles planned?

For sure! We haven’t announced anything yet, but we have a ton of awesome game ideas brewing. Overgrowth is just the beginning.

What are you thoughts about computer games vs console games?

I own all three of the current gen consoles, so I’m a huge fan. While I love to play multiplayer games like Little Big Planet and Super Smash Brothers with my buddies on the console, ultimately I would never trade PC gaming for it.

The PC is a much more open platform — companies like Wolfire would not exist without it. The only games you’d ever see would be hand picked by Sony, Nintendo, and Microsoft.

With that said, consoles are looking really nice from a developers perspective. It kind of sucks when you make a PC game and upwards of 90% of your downloads come from pirates. Most indie developers who have made it onto the consoles report that their game had much, much higher sales than on PC. It’s really hard to ignore that.

I think there is definitely room for all platforms. We support everything we can, including Mac and Linux. If Sony, Nintendo, or Microsoft let us on their platform, that would be very interesting.

Besides making games, what else are you passionate about?

I love all types of biking and probably bike around Berkeley more than I walk. I’m a pretty hardcore nerd and love all kinds of technology and the startup culture in general.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

One cool thing about our game engine is that we’ve embedded WebKit thanks to the Awesomium library. This means that all of the user interface elements you see in the game are created with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

In other words, don’t be surprised if you stumble across Disqus comments while you are playing Overgrowth.

If you would like to learn more about Jeff and his game company Wolfire visit their twitterwebsite, or Disqus Profile.

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Wednesday, 15 Jul 2009 21:50

Each and every language translated on the Disqus comment system has been done by our users. We’ve added support for several new languages and we have a few more on the way:

  • Slovak
  • Chinese (simplified)
  • Vietnamese
  • Romanian
  • Indonesian
  • Swedish
  • Spanish (Argentinean)

Huge thanks to all our translators!

In this round: Branorac, Mu Yufan, Xoai, Svoinea, Omericit, Guhprasetjardenberg, HenrikAI, Jonas Alvunger, Chokladkakan, and Juarez Polanco.

To change the language for your Disqus comments just visit your settings page and choose it from the drop-down. If you’d like to volunteer to help us translate, email translation@disqus.com. We are always looking to support more languages!

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Monday, 13 Jul 2009 16:06

This past Friday, the folks from fellow comment system provider, JS-Kit, announced dramatically that “[blog] comments are dead.”

It’s a catchy platitude and one that surely was not meant to be taken literally. Most did see it as a fun sound bite and a good way to introduce a couple new features. A few others, however, read a bit more into it and asked what Disqus thought about the death of comments and its replacement, the social stream.

We think about comments quite often at Disqus, as you can imagine. Over the weekend, I answered a number of similar questions so I thought I could address this a little better on this blog.

Comments are not dead. Encouraging a real community on your site to have real conversations has always been important. It’s still important today and is only becoming increasingly more relevant. It’s very true that people have choices on where to react to a topic; they can tweet about it, discuss it on Reddit, or share it on FriendFeed. Conversations are happening outside of sites and it’s important to bring that value back to the source content.

That’s why we introduced Reactions, a built-in feature of Disqus that aggregates comments and mentions of your blog post or article and displays them with the comments. We released this about 4 months ago with our friends at uberVU, and are now also working with our friends at BackType, to bring reactions to all publishers using Disqus. Since then, millions of reactions have been aggregated for the discussion communities powered by Disqus. There are a dozen services that we support, including the popular Twitter, FriendFeed, and Digg.

I truly believe in social reactions to augment comments. But how about making it a single social stream in place of conventional comments? Why not throw all comments and reactions into a single timeline? Personally, I believe it’s too noisy. The idea behind a single social stream seems to be for amassing volume of mentions, similar to trackbacks. They’re not very useful. It’s for ego, rather than fostering a coherent discussion. The conversation is continually broken up and the context is lost.

What do you think? I’d like to hear what you think about the future of comments. Disqus is an always-evolving system that should work the way you want it to. If you’d like to check out JS-Kit’s new system that I’ve been referring to, you can see it at http://js-kit.com.

– Daniel

Author: "Daniel" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 10 Jul 2009 01:27

Where did you grow up?

Well I was born in Birmingham, Alabama. But most of my years growing up and discovering what I wanted to do were in Midland, TX. I lived in Birmingham, AL until I was 9, so I don’t really remember a whole lot of it, I guess most of my time there was spent building things out of Legos and K-Nex. Once we moved to Midland, I started my focus on technology. I lived in Midland for 9 years as well. This past year, 2009 obviously, I have started attending a school up in Pennsylvania to obtain a degree in entrepreneurship which I hope will give me a business side to my internet focused mind.

What do you find intriguing about the internet industry?

Probably the biggest thing that draws me is the opportunity for learning and knowledge from other people. I have always believed the saying that, “everyone is an expert at something” and I think that through the web we can fully take advantage of people’s expertise where it matters. There is a huge opportunity online for collaboration and for people with similar interests to help out one another and discover even more about their favorite topics.

What else are you passionate about?

Surprisingly I guess , I do not fit most ‘geeky’ stereotypes. I do a lot of social things with local people, once again showing my love for group communication. I am extremely passionate about music and find myself taking breaks often from web design/coding to jam out some riffs on the guitar. It is a great way to relieve stress and is usually the perfect break to get me inspired on something new with whatever I was working on. I am looking into really getting started with photography, but I haven’t had as much time recently based on quite a bit of client work.

Where did you first hear about Disqus?

Well Disqus just turned out to be the solution to the problem I always knew was there, but never really had a solution for. I think I first ran across Disqus before I really knew a lot about it on a number of high-profile blogs and websites. A lot of people I admired in the web/graphic design industry seemed to have started to adopt it as a standard and after looking into it some, I decided to adopt it as well on my web projects.

What’s your one favorite feature on Disqus?

I think my favorite feature of Disqus is really the core feature itself. I do a lot of web surfing and being able to keep track of where I have posted comments is really essential. Before Disqus, I tried to keep track of things with Delicious bookmarks and email updates, but I soon realized that this type of thing needed its own dedicated system. Which is exactly what Discuss does so perfectly.

What feature would you add to Disqus?

Well I am not sure what all you guys are working on over there, but with the addition of push notifications in the iPhone app store with 3.0, some sort of Disqus app with push notifications I think would rock.

When you graduate what type of company would you like to start?

My dream would be to start a web design or web application development studio. The internet never ceases to fascinate me every day, there is an endless supply of knowledge available to anyone. This really excites me because the more people there are that are seeking to share their ideas and opinions online, the more need their will be for hopeful companies like mine to help out in compiling and organizing that data so that it can be the most useful to as many people as possible. I know that in the future the internet will continue to grow and innovate in finding new ways of helping out people and making everyone’s life easier and I want to be there right at the front of it.

To learn more about Mac visit his twitter, website, or Disqus Profile.

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 10 Jul 2009 00:57

Yola brings website building to Small businesses. Groups and organizations. Non-profits. Your Aunt Martha. The guy in the next cube. Everyone.

Yola previously was Synthasite an installation we have instructions for but they changed a couple things besides the name of the service.

How do I integrate Disqus?

First, a couple questions:

  • Do you have a Disqus account? No? You’ll need one, go here.
  • Did you add a site? No? Add it here.

Keep in mind there are two types of integrations for Yola.

  1. Blog (yeah, duh)
  2. Website (single page)

Alright, lets add Disqus to your blog!

  • Login to Yola.com
  • Click Blog Manager
  • Click Settings.
  • Visit this page and login to Disqus.
    Make sure to choose your site from the drop-down.
  • Click Generic Code
  • Copy and Paste Snippet #1 on your Yola settings page here:

To learn more about adding Disqus to a single page layout or adding CSS visit our help documentation.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Tuesday, 07 Jul 2009 17:24

OpenID is an open, decentralized standard for user authentication and access control, allowing users to log onto many services with the same digital identity.

Similar to our support for Facebook Connect, & Twitter Sign-in. OpenID makes it easier and quicker for people to jump into a discussion. To enable Open ID, publishers should proceed to Admin/Settings and enable the feature under Options.

For commenters, just look for the OpenID Sign-in button on sites that have this enabled.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 26 Jun 2009 22:14

What do you do for a living?

I am a content manager and correspondent for ABC News. I cover politics and technology - though I cover much less now that it is a non-campaign year. And, I’m learning a lot from the seasoned journalists that I work with - I’m low on the totem pole here, and covered much more in my previous job. I’m sure this will change come 2012 Presidential cycle.

When you were a kid what did you always dream of becoming?

I probably didn’t have the insight to really know what I wanted. As an adolescent - like EVERY adolescent - I played in punk bands and wanted to be Jello Biafra or Henry Rollins.

Where did you first hear about Disqus?

Hrm, no idea - probably a late-night solution patrol for Wordpress features. This, however, is unremarkable - what I enjoyed about the service was the personal attention to detail by the staff.

What’s your one favorite feature in Disqus?

The reduction in barriers to entry for reader/user participation - the easier it is for people to interact on a blog post correlates directly to the number of comments on blog posts. This, in turn, helps build community.

Is there anything that you would change or add to Disqus?

The major issue I have with Disqus and many services is that I have to install a code - I’m very comfortable with code, but abhor widgets, javascript code beyond tracking, and any service that does not integrate as white label or function as a core part of the platform. This is NOT a knock on Disqus at all, but rather a differentiation between the types of sites that I need to run for clients and myself. Disqus is great and I recommend it to friends frequently.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Cedar Rapids, Iowa - my family is from New Jersey, New Hampshire, and Brooklyn - I attended college in Spearfish, South Dakota at Black Hills State University and studied under Ahrar Ahmad and Dave Diamond, I lived in California for two years before returning to complete a second and third degree at BHSU. I moved from South Dakota to Brooklyn in 2007

What influenced you to begin your career in the news? Was there a defining moment?

I’ve always been in to news and politics. My parents always subscribed to the newspaper, and some of my earliest memories are watching the nightly news - followed (maybe aptly) by MASH. I was a paper carrier in junior high. When traveling with family, I was exposed to very poor parts of the country - my parents made a point to show us seedy parts of Brooklyn, the Pine Ridge and Rose Bud Lakota reservations. We would talk about cultural marginalization and taught empathy for those less fortunate. I’m sure I was radicalized at a formative age by punk rock + skate culture, but always valued education (though HS grades sucked and I hate elitism). I was fortunate to have very qualified professors in college who helped me refine my radicalism in to a more articulate form.

I started podcasting in mid-2004 with the Creepy Sleepy Show - prior to that I was involved in radio and geek culture, but Creepy Sleepy let myself a rotating cast to explore topics sans censorship. This lead to doing citizen journalism and covering the South Dakota Abortion Ban in 2006 - I was the only podcaster or Blogger given access, which taught me both the power of new media, AND the importance of good solid journalism - it taught me that not matter how passionately one feels about a given topic, there are others who feel just as passionately about the opposition, and they frequently have valid points. It taught me that it’s not enough to just simple scream “this is MY opinion” - EVERYone has opinions, why is YOUR opinion valid - and if one cannot answer that question in ways that hold of to standard litmus tests of respect, credibility, due diligence - then their opinion is ONLY opinion.

In your career as a correspondent, is there one project that stood out among others?

I was hired after the Abortion Ban by my former employer, Talk Radio News, in New York, to cover the UN and campaign - I also traveled internationally, saw terrible terrible things, and learned that for injustice to be overcome, one MUST be balanced internally and aware of ones own failings - this helps you value objectivity, learining all sides of an issue, and that without the trust of an audience, there is no point to reporting. No, there isn’t one project that stands out as more formative than the others. I try hard to make sure that my life experiences add up to something that I, my family, my teachers/mentors, and colleagues can respect.

The campaign was exhilarating and exhausting, and Darfur left some pretty deep scars. Those things I do remember. The UN as well, but less dramatically. The campaign is an exercise in both the best of American ideas, and the worst of American narcissism. Darfur left both an emotional and literal, visual impact - it’s very hard not to feel conflicted about drinking the last drops of water in front of people who are starving and being shot/raped - knowing that if you do NOT drink the last water, any resource that remains will cause a riot resulting in injury or death. Also, when big dudes point AK47s at you, it’s hard to forget.

In your opinion, has commenting effected the world of online publishing?

We are fortunate in that we live in an age of media transition. We have not figured everything out, but we are lucky in that WE get to help solve these problems. I believe a few things:

  1. Humans are inherently social creatures
  2. Humans desire to communicate for several reasons - primarily to transfer information and for emotional gratification.

Previously, we simply did not have the necessary tools that would facilitate rapid two-way communication, so we made due with what we had. Now, we can easily and cheaply communicate with each other and this has lead to a plethora of opportunities for different types of communication. They key word here is ‘different’ - not better, not worse - just different. Social Media has it’s problems, just like traditional media.

Social Media has it’s problems, just like traditional media. These are not insurmountable problems, but they are problems none the less. Because of this, I try to remember the classic Spiderman line: “with great power comes great responsibility” - just because we’re the new, hot shit does not mean we also do not have responsibility for our actions. Yes, we can comment on blogs, twitter, facebook, et al - but what we say and how we act reflects on both person and our medium. Social media reduces the distance and friction between humans and other humans and information. These are tools, just like newspapers and broadcast towers. They must be used responsibly. Additionally, the Long Tail is powerful - but the Long Tail still needs a Head. Well, it doesn’t NEED a head, but there will ALWAYS be blockbusters - with or without the internet. Some things do NOT have a business model built in, yet are necessary functions of society. We have three branches of government under the current Federal system - often Media is called the Fourth Estate. This is because the media will serve as a check on the other branches of government. This is, undoubtedly, an essential civic service (not to mention the important cultural role media plays). Having said that, business models are changing and the means by which Media has funded itself is changing. Just because media used to make more money, does not make it any less relevant. We still need communication and dialog between people, the People’s government, and the organizations that report on people and government. These things cost money. Are they entitled to make money? No. But do we want to live in a society that can’t afford to do journalism like Bob Woodward did, or that requires travel to under reported areas? I’m willing to bet most people answer ‘no, we don’t want to give up good journalism.

To learn more about Dan visit his website, twitter, or Disqus Profile.

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com

Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Wednesday, 24 Jun 2009 19:53

Lijit allows you to easily create your own search engine. One that searches your blog, bookmarks, photos, blogroll, comments, and much more.

few months ago we talked about Lijit and their integration of Disqus comments within their search results. Since then, we’ve learned that Lijit search results which include comments alongside the posts are seeing roughly 3-5% greater click-through rates than those without comments.  This reaffirms what we’ve been hearing for a while — that comments can serve as an effective means of signaling engagement and quality for a given blog post.

To learn more about our integration with Lijit check out their site.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 19 Jun 2009 17:33

Eric Rice is a Silicon Valley-based new media producer and writer.

What do you do for a living?

My time is actually split between business consulting and freelance design. It can run the whole range of disciplines, really. I started in print design about 20 years ago, evolved to multimedia and web. It’s bounced from landscape and interior design to game design, to multimedia and print. How I ended up in such a wide field, I have no idea.

Do you love what you do?

Totally, and it gives me the ability to do whatever I want to do or need to do. I can travel the world, yet I home school one of my kids. It can be difficult at times, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be fun, too.

So what’s the coolest project that you worked on?

That’s like asking who’s my favorite kid. Let’s see… One of my favorite projects wasn’t a job, but a proof-of-concept. It was in a social 3D world, where I was a host destination for a Talib Kweli music installation. I had re-designed the surrounding 3D neighborhood to showcase indie hip-hop, which would complement the Kweli project. An agency called Millions Of Us built Kweli’s place, and I designed podcast-safe music kiosks, making the whole area a kind of Brooklyn-ish ‘music alley’. The traffic was unbelievable– and of course being in a virtual place– people wanted to live there. I was ridiculously proud of that project.

So which one of your kids is your favorite then? j/k

haha.. The one not currently screaming™

How did you find Disqus?

Honestly, I don’t even remember since it’s been that long ago. It was probably through the usual early-technology-adopter blogs, although seeing it in use practically everywhere might have been the bigger influence. Even my town’s 1997-era web newspaper, which is plagued with banner ad overkill and frames, uses Disqus. I think I’m one out of two in the mass of commenters on the paper’s site that is a verified user. For the paper, it’s not a Disqus issue, it’s a web comments issue. Anonymity might have a few benefits, however I think it’s the first thing to be abused, making the conversation useless and without credibility. Newspapers have to learn ‘community’ first, then they can use the tools to foster it.

What’s your favorite Disqus feature?

I think the ‘Like’ feature. It’s a small feature, however it makes it a bit easier to rate a comment, instead of the person.

If you could add one thing to Disqus, what would it be, and why?

The pronunciation of DISQUS, heh. I’ve never thought to pronounce it ‘discuss’ since the logo visually puts the emphasis on DISQ. It’s always been like the Olympic sporting event. As far as features hmmm.. I’m generally happy with it. I don’t have any glaring OMG FIX THIS like I do with other web software. When a new feature shows up, it’s a nice surprise (like ‘Like’). I think that’s why I like Disqus– because it gets out of my way and doesn’t require me to think about it. So surprise me, I have no wishlist.

To learn more about Eric vist his website, twitter, or Disqus Profile.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Tuesday, 16 Jun 2009 00:34

We’ve updated the email notifications feature on Disqus to be more powerful and reach more of your visitors.

Why is this awesome?

Previously, only commenters with a Disqus Profile could receive email notifications when new comments were posted in the thread. Now, everyone can receive replies for the entire conversation, even Guest commenters.

There’s a couple of ways to subscribe by email. Let’s say someone was reading your post but was not compelled to comment just yet. However, they may still want to keep up with the conversation. They can click “Subscribe by email” without posting a comment.

If a Guest wants to subscribe while posting a comment, they can simply select “Subscribe to all comments” under the comment box. We like to keep things simple but powerful here at Disqus.

Commenters with a Disqus Profile can manage your notifications here.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 12 Jun 2009 19:06

Annie is a mom, and a Wordpress theme designer.

What do you do for a living?

I’m a web developer and WordPress customizer/troubleshooter.

What got you into that business?

It began as a hobby, something I could do for fun when my kids were little. Friends began to ask me to help them with their sites, and it grew from there. I do it on a part-time basis. It sure beats other part-time jobs out there!

How did you find Disqus?

I heard about it awhile back, just in the general Twitter chatter.

What feature do you use most?

I’ve been lax with the blogging thing lately I’m afraid, that’s going to change soon. I’ve used twitter comments a few times, very handy.

If you could request one additional feature for Disqus, what would it be and why?

Hmm, not sure…maybe the ability to upload an image within a comment? Sometimes a picture can be the best response.

To learn more about Annie visit her site, twitter, or Disqus Profile.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
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Date: Friday, 05 Jun 2009 00:03

A tech geek who loves programming, designing, and digital photography.

So what do you do for a living?

I’m a Programmer Analyst at the University of California, Riverside, doing mainly LAMP development, help desk, as well as staff training on various software. LAMP development means linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP (or another programming language). In my case, it’s PHP.

Outside of programming, what are you passionate about?

I’m very passionate about new technologies, especially in social media, gadgets, apps, and new ways of gaming. Another one of interests is scrap booking! I take a ton of photos, so I need a creative way to display them all.

Have you always been involved with technology?

Not always. Not until I got my first computer in my junior year of high school. But even then, it wasn’t apparent that my life would take the technology route. I went off to college and majored in Computer Science, and that’s when I my love for web design flourished.

How did you find Disqus?

I found Disqus through FriendFeed.

What do you find appealing about Disqus?

It’s familiar and very easy to use!

What was the first computer you owned?

It was a Packard Bell, running Windows 3.1. I later got a Windows 95 upgrade CD about 2 weeks after.

If you could add one feature to Disqus, what would it be?

That’s such a hard question. I like software that keeps it simple, and that’s what Disqus does. The addition of multiple logins is great, as well as the “like” feature. I can’t think of anything else that would make it better. But if I do, I’ll definitely let you know.

If you would like to learn more about Daynah check out her website, twitter, or Disqus Profile.

Cheers,

Giannii
DISQUS
Community Manager
giannii@disqus.com
Author: "Giannii" Tags: "disqus"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
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