• Shortcuts : 'n' next unread feed - 'p' previous unread feed • Styles : 1 2

» Publishers, Monetize your RSS feeds with FeedShow:  More infos  (Show/Hide Ads)


Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 17:03
A History of the United States Patent Office
By: Jason O. Watson
April 17, 2001

"The patent system added the fuel of interest to the fire of genius." Abraham Lincoln (the only U.S. President to be issued a patent)1.

The United States Patent Office represented an early form of Federal support for science. This support enabled scientists, inventors, and entrepreneurs to secure property rights for their innovations. While many of the original thirteen American Colonies had some form of patent law, Thomas Jefferson (among others) influenced the development of the first national patent system in 1790. The United States Constitution, along with legislative acts in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, helped to promote the necessary environment for scientists and inventors to protect and market their creations. A major result of the marketability of intellectual property was the development and growth of the American corporation, beginning in the mid-nineteenth century.

The modern concept of the patent was established in England where, in 1449, King Henry VI awarded a patent to John of Utynam for stained glass manufacturing.2 This patent established the notion of a state-granted limited monopoly.3 While in fifteenth century England there was nothing novel regarding the art of stained glass making, the monarchy recognized the value of protecting certain arts and industries, including those that were imported from other parts of Europe (in this case Italy).

Beginning in 1552, a series of "letters patents" was issued by the Crown. The monarchy began a trend of issuing patents for its own benefit and for the benefit of officers and friends of the Court.4 Patents were issued on entire industries, not just inventions. For example, the Stationers enjoyed complete control over the publishing industry in England. The balance of power soon shifted towards those whom the monarchy decided to favor. Reform began with reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Francis Bacon commented that the Queen would grant patents for any invention that she deemed useful to the country. In an effort to curb further abuses of power, Parliament, in 1624, passed the English Statute of Monopolies, which outlawed all royally sanctioned monopolies. Realizing the importance of protecting inventors and the economic benefits associated with encouraging innovation, an exception was allowed for patents of "new manufactures." These patents were awarded to the inventor as long as their new devices did not hurt trade or result in price increases. Additionally, a statutory limit of fourteen years was imposed on English patents.

The history and evolution of the English patent system is important for understanding the foundation of America's patent system. Sherwood writes, "The idea of a patent system came to the New World with immigrants from England... the American patent system thus reveals a concern for the rights of the inventor and of society in general."5

Article 1, Section 8, Clause 8 (the "Intellectual Property Clause" also called the Patent and/or Copyright Clause) of the United States Constitution states, "Congress shall have the Power... To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." The language of the Intellectual Property Clause vaguely defines the government's role in protecting the citizens' "exclusive Right" to their intellectual property. As a result of the ambiguity with the Patent Clause, Federal support of science and technology through policy influence with respect to intellectual property.

Congress passed several patent acts during the first half century following the ratification of the Constitution. These acts include the Patent Act of 1790, the Patent Act of 1793, and the Patent Act of 1836. It is important to examine the provisions outlined by these acts, and analyze the impact of each upon American scientists of the time. The provisions outlined by this series of Congressional legislation are the foundation upon which the modern-day Patent Office is based.

Shortly after the First Congress assembled, a bill was presented to comply with the Intellectual Property Clause as well to address President Washington's concerns that such a law be enacted as soon as possible. In his first address to Congress on January 8, 1790, he stated, "I cannot forbear intimating to you the expediency of giving effectual encouragement, as well to the introduction of new and useful inventions from abroad as to the exertion of skill and genius at home."6

The Patent Act of 1790 (H.R. 41, introduced February 16, 1790, passed March 10, 1790) was crafted in part by Thomas Jefferson. As a result, it incorporated many of his beliefs including requirements for patents to have models submitted with all applications. Jefferson believed that ideas should not be patentable, rather patents should be issued only for physical inventions that have been reduced to practice.

An obvious imitation of the British patent system, the first American patent law limited the life of patents to fourteen years, with no possibility of an extension. This provision caused debate from inventors who wanted extended protection times on their patents since it took several years to commercialize their inventions. An important clause to the 1790 Patent Act was the disqualification of foreign (imported) patents - Jefferson firmly believed that only American citizens should be afforded the benefits of obtaining patent rights.7 The Act contradicts Washington's request for the "introduction of new and useful inventions from abroad," an issue that was later addressed by Congress in 1836.

While Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin were generally opposed to the awarding of limited monopolies to inventors, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton were in favor of providing inventors with rewards for their inventions. Madison favored a system that would give inventors monetary prizes, or other rewards. This type of system is evident in the 1787 promise from Congress to James Rumsey of 30,000 acres of land in Ohio if he could demonstrate a steamboat that traveled up the Ohio River.8 The case of the steamboat is particularly interesting because rights were given to Rumsey, as well as to John Fitch for the same invention.

The Patent Act of 1790 is the result of a compromise between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists that complies with the Intellectual Property Clause of the Constitution. As a result, the need to reward inventors for providing a socially beneficial innovation is addressed within the Act.

To address the shortcomings of the 1790 Act, Thomas Jefferson wrote a bill that was introduced in Congress on February 7, 1791. The bill proposed the elimination of the three-member cabinet panel requirement to grant a patent, and instead required only the signature of the Secretary of State. The bill stated that descriptions of newly issued patents be published in various newspapers, as well as filed with all the U.S. District Courts. Additionally, a provision that would protect the non-intentional, non-commercial use of a patented invention from an infringement suit was included.9 Had this bill passed and remained in effect, many of the present-day's legal issues regarding patents and intellectual property rights could have been avoided.

Alexander Hamilton drafted a competing patent bill that was introduced on March 1, 1792. This bill addressed the issues of handling cases in which disputes regarding overlapping patents were handled. Hamilton proposed that the Supreme Court of the United States settle such arguments. Additionally, he inserted a provision that allotted the revenue from patent fees to be allocated for the purchasing of books and other scientific apparatus as well as for the establishment of a national library.10 An examination of both Jefferson's and Hamilton's proposed legislation reveals that both sides of the political spectrum during this time were interested in the Federal government's promotion of scientific endeavors. The only significant debates were over the details of implementation and the Constitutionality of direct Federal support for science.

After several revisions and additions, various elements of both Hamilton's and Jefferson's bills resulted in the Patent Act of 1793. This Act formally created a Patent Board, comprised of the Secretary of State, Attorney General, and Secretary of War. The responsibility of the issuance of patents belonged to the Department of State (at the time under Jefferson). A patent would be issued if two-thirds of the Patent Board determined the invention as "sufficiently useful and important."11 Oftentimes the various cabinet members were not experts in any specific art or scientific field. Likewise, many were not familiar with science and technology in general (Jefferson, of course, was an exception). These men often had other pressing duties that they were occupied with. As a result, many patents were issued that perhaps should not have been while other worthy patent applications were neglected.

The Act of 1793 was passed largely in response to inventors complaints that the system established in 1790 was inefficient. Patent applications took several months to be examined, and less than half (fifty-seven total patents) were eventually issued between the 1790 Act and the Act of 1793. This discouraged inventors to file applications, which at the time required a trip to New York and later Philadelphia.

As Secretary of State, Jefferson was responsible for the examination and issuance of the first patents. He employed personnel from the University of Pennsylvania to assist in the examination of patent applications - this was an early example of indirect Federal support for the sciences. Additionally, this shows that Jefferson recognized the importance of an expert's opinion in determining novelty, usefulness, and reduction to practice of an invention. Although the Act of 1793 intended to fix the problems from 1790, however, more issues arose from this legislation.

In the era between 1793 and 1836, the patent system experienced an increase in the number of patent applications. The increased flow of applications highlighted many problems with the still loosely organized patent office. Dupree writes, "The patent office languished, but inventors were ever more active."12 In general, the quality of patents suffered. Many patents issued were neither novel nor useful. Also, the courts were overwhelmed by a large number of infringement and patent validity suits.13

In 1836, Congress passed another Patent Act. This Act established a Patent Office, still under the Department of State, but separate from the duties of the Secretary of State. The Act was responsible for reforming problems in the previous acts - namely increasing the efficiency of the patent application process. Henry Ellsworth, who was instrumental in drafting the Act, was appointed to be the first Commissioner of Patents.

Through the Patent Act of 1836 a system was created for distributing new patents to libraries in every state. As a result, newly issued patents were distributed on a regular basis throughout the country. This provision resembles Hamilton's suggestion that information regarding new patents be published and made publicly available. A goal of the establishment of these libraries was to provide the general public access to the knowledge disclosed within the various patents. This practice led to an increase in the number of new applications as well as to an enhanced quality of such applications. "By consulting the patents in a sub-class a searcher may determine, before submitting an application to the office whether the invention contained in it has been anticipated by prior patents."14

By 1843, women played a role in the early Patent Office. Many were hired to make copies of patents that were to be distributed to the various libraries across the country. At this time, these women were paid ten cents for every hundred words copied. Annie Ellsworth, the daughter of Commissioner Ellsworth, was one of these patent copiers. She was given the opportunity to send the first message over Samuel Morse's telegraph from Washington, D.C. to Baltimore. Her now famous message was, "What hath God wrought!"15

By the early 1850's women were performing additional duties in the Patent Office. These tasks included assisting with patent examinations. The position was described as a clerk-copyist, not very different from the part-time work that was done by Annie Ellsworth and others. Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross was among the first women to hold this position. Rossiter suggests that the work was not very pleasant, "[they were] women patent examiners doing such detailed painstaking, and indoor ("feminine"?) work as the job required."16 By comparison, this position was similar to other jobs that women held in science during this time - many did tedious work in laboratories or calculations in observatories.

An important area of reform that the 1836 act addressed was the duration of a patent's effective life. Arguing for the necessity for expanded patent protection, Eli Whitney wrote to Congress in 1812 that he "was soon reduced to the disagreeable necessity of resorting to the courts of Justice for the protection of his [intellectual] property." Whitney found it difficult to enforce his cotton gin patent against numerous acts of infringement. Consequently, by the time the courts ruled on his infringement case, his patent's life had already expired.17 The Patent Act of 1836 maintained the life of a patent for fourteen years, but allowed for an extension of an additional seven years with the approval of the Commissioner.

Once the necessary legislation was passed, the enhancement of the statutory monopoly for patent holders opened the door for individuals and businesses to exploit the marketplace to the fullest extent possible. Particularly in the second half of the nineteenth century, many people became very wealthy from royalty streams derived from patented inventions. This environment gave rise to the American corporation - many of which are large, powerful companies still in existence. Examples of such landmark patents include Colt's revolver patents (U.S. Patent Nos. X9430 and 1,304, 1839); Otis' elevator patent (U.S. Patent No. 31,128, 1861); Yale's lock patent (U.S. Patent No. 31,278, 1861); and Eastman's camera patent (U.S. Patent No. 388,850, 1888).

During the nineteenth century, inventors realized the economic advantages associated with protecting their innovations in the form of patents. As a result, the number of applications for new patents increased from 765 in 1840 to 21,276 in 1867. This increase led to a proportional increase in the revenues and profits of the Patent Office realized through its fees. In 1840, the total revenue for the office was $38,056. This amount increased to $646,581 and was well over a million dollars by the end of the century.18

An additional factor that contributed to the increase of patent applications was the periods of the U.S. Civil War and the following Reconstruction Era. In response to a greater need for technological improvements, many patents were issued in specialized areas. For example, many patents were related to military applications - Gatling's machine gun patent (U.S. Patent No. 36,836, 1862) and Nobel's dynamite patent (U.S. Patent No. 78,317, 1868). Additionally, the periods including and following the Civil War saw rapid increases in the number of patent applications and issuances. In 1861, 4,643 applications were filed - by 1865 the number of applications grew to 10,664 and to 20,445 in 1868.19 As with future periods in American history, there was a noticeable shift in the efforts of inventors and scientists in order to accommodate the war effort. The period leading up to and including World War I saw patents issued for a submarine (1902, U.S. Patent No. 708,553), airplane (1906, U.S. Patent No. 821,393), rocket (1914, U.S. Patent No. 1,102,653), and hydroplane (1922, U.S. Patent No. 1,420,609). Similarly patents issued during the era of World War II included the jet engine (1946, U.S. Patent No. 2,404,334) and atomic reactor (1955, U.S. Patent No. 2,708,656).20

Many of the patents issued during the 18th and 19th centuries were attempts to solve practical problems. In part, the practical nature of most patents was a reflection of Jefferson's ideals that only physical, useful inventions should be granted a patent. It was not until the mid-twentieth century that there was a call to patent "everything made by man under the sun." America saw an increased number of inventors. As a result, more patents were filed. Among these were several landmark patents during the first hundred years following the Patent Act of 1790. Included among these are Eli Whitney's Cotton Gin patent (U.S. Patent No. X72, 1774); Samuel Morse's Morse Code patent (U.S. Patent No. 1,647, 1840); Charles Goodyear's Vulcanized Rubber patent (U.S. Patent No. 3,633, 1844); Alexander Graham Bell's Telephone patent (U.S. Patent No. 174,465).21

A method of grouping like patents together was needed, and a resulting patent classification system was implemented. Eli Whitney's cotton gin patent is filed as the first patent under the classification 19/61 which is "Textiles: Fiber Preparation/Seed Boards." Since the issuance of this patent in 1774, 79 additional patents that innovated improvements off this original patent were issued. The last patent issued in this series was U.S. Patent 3,811,979 issued in 1975. Likewise, Samuel Morse's telegraph patent (classified at 178/2R "Telegraphy: Systems") provided the foundation for 807 additional patents related to his original invention. Classified as 156/276 "Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture: with mass application of nonadhesive fibers or particles between laminae" Goodyear's vulcanized rubber patent was innovated upon by more than 450 later patents. Finally, Bell's telephone patent has over 350 related patents filed afterwards. This patent was classified as 379/167 "Telephonic communications: private or single line communications."

The explosion of patents enabled corporations to essentially create legalized monopolies on their inventions. Many have argued that this has hurt competition, while others show that the rise of the corporation beginning in the late nineteenth century has helped America grow into an economic power.

In conclusion, the existence and development of a patent system in the United States provided the necessary stimulus to foster an environment of rapid technological advancement. The legal treatment of patents as a piece of property, no different from real estate, provided the groundwork required to create large powerful corporations. These corporations profited significantly from their state-granted limited monopolies. The system created by the Patent Act of 1836 has remained largely intact, with a few minor adjustments. However, as our Founders feared, this system has led to continued abuses and problems with the United States Patent Office.

Patents currently take several years from date of application filing to date of issuance. Many times, a patent is issued long after the technology that was embodied in the patent has become obsolete. Patents are still being granted for obvious, non-useful inventions. Additionally, there currently exists a flood of patent infringement litigation - American corporations have realized the financial benefit associated with winning a patent infringement suit. Millions of dollars are routinely awarded for damages and patent licensing fees. For some, patents have become nothing more than a mechanism for bargaining in court.

From: http://www.m-cam.com/~watsonj/usptohistory.html
Author: "Duncan"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 12:44
IP Blog Roundup

Robert J. Ambrogi
Law Technology News
11-01-2004

For lawyers in many fields, blogs are becoming the new "pocket part." With their immediacy and focus, they provide up-to-the-minute news and analysis of judicial, legislative and regulatory developments. More than in any other area of law, this is the case for intellectual property. Dozens of blogs now track developments in patent, trademark and copyright law. Written by practicing lawyers, full-time academics and even non-lawyers, they discuss events virtually as they happen, often adding their unique perspective and analysis.

Here is a survey of selected IP blogs. The listing is alphabetical, not by ranking. (For the sake of space, omitted are those that focus on domain name rights and governance.)

• Anything Under the Sun Made by Man, www.krajec.com/blog. This blog about patents and business strategies is written by Coloradan Russ Krajec, a registered patent agent, engineer, and inventor with more than 20 U.S. patents of his own. He writes about topics such as claims and drafting, patent strategies and the business of patent law.

• Berkeley Intellectual Property Weblog, http://www.biplog.com/. Originally produced by a class at the University of California Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, faculty and students carry on its mission of advancing the debate about intellectual property by aggregating noteworthy, factual information with thought-provoking commentary.

• Chris Rush Cohen, http://www.chris-cohen.blogspot.com/. A third-year student at Benjamin Cardozo School of Law, Cohen writes about IP and Internet law, technology news, and New York City.

• Copyfight, www.corante.com/copyfight. Focused on "the politics of IP," Copyfight is jointly written by a group of academics, practitioners and writers highly regarded in the fields of IP and Internet law. Their purpose is to explore the nexus of law and "the networked world."

• Current Copyright Readings, http://copyrightreadings.blogspot.com/. M. Claire Stewart, head of digital media services at the Northwestern University Library, describes this as a bibliography of current articles on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the Teach Act and other copyright issues.

• Dan Fingerman, www.danfingerman.com/dtm. A patent litigator in San Jose, Calif., Fingerman writes about a hodgepodge of topics, from patents to hockey.

• Rader Blog, http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blogs/rader. Elizabeth Rader, fellow in residence at Stanford Law School's The Center for Internet and Society, writes about IP, privacy and Internet law.

• Furdlog, http://msl1.mit.edu/furdlog. Frank Field, senior research engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Center for Technology, Policy and Industrial Development, writes about the technology, culture and policy of IP.

• Greplaw, http://grep.law.harvard.edu/. From Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet Law and Technology, Greplaw follows recent developments in IP and Internet law.

• Guiding Rights Blog, http://guidingrights.blogcollective.com/blog. An intellectual property lawyer in Chicago, Mark Partridge publishes this blog as an extension of his 2003 book, Guiding Rights: Trademarks, Copyright and the Internet. He posts frequently about IP news and legal developments.

• Induce Act Blawg, http://techlawadvisor.com/induce. Three writers contribute to this blog, devoted to tracking and commenting on the Inducing Infringements of Copyright Act of 2004.

• IP Litigation Blog, http://www.iplitigationblog.com/. On Aug. 31, 2004, Seattle, Wash., lawyer Philip Mann marked two achievements -- he launched this blog, and he launched his own firm, the Mann Law Group. It is difficult to take the measure of a blog this new, but worth noting is the blog's striking design, a product of Kevin O'Keefe's lexBlog, www.lexblog.com.

• IPTAblog, http://www.iptablog.org/. Third-year law student Andrew Raff writes with a focus on how computers and the Internet affect the practice and substance of law, particularly within the areas of copyright, trademark and privacy.

• I/P Updates, http://ip-updates.blogspot.com/. William Heinze, an IP lawyer in Atlanta, where he is of counsel to the firm Thomas, Kayden, Horstemeyer & Risley, provides news and information for IP practitioners. He is a frequent and thoughtful writer who covers a range of IP-related matters.

• The Invent Blog, http://www.inventblog.com/. Stephen Nipper, a patent attorney in Boise, Idaho, provides news and information about patents, trademarks, copyrights and IP law in general. But of most interest are his postings about unique and noteworthy inventions and inventors.

• IP News Blog, http://www.ipnewsblog.com/. Students and faculty at the Franklin Pierce Law Center provide frequent reports on developments in U.S. and international IP law.

• IPKat, http://www.ipkat.com/. Jeremy Phillips and Ilanah Simon are prominent U.K. academics, editors and authors in the field of IP law. Their blog looks at copyright, patent, trademark, branding and privacy law from a mainly U.K. and European perspective.

• Navigating the Patent Maze, http://lorac.typepad.com/patent_blog. Having spent part of her career spearheading development of an online IP database, Carol Nottenburg, now a Seattle patent lawyer, brings to her blog a unique focus on finding and using online patent data.

• Nerd Law.org, http://www.nerdlaw.org/. Kimberly Isbell, an IP associate with a Washington, D.C., law firm and a former law-student affiliate of Harvard's Berkman Center, blogs about what she describes as "law for nerds at heart."

• Patently Obvious, http://patentlaw.typepad.com/. Dennis Crouch, a patent attorney at the Chicago law firm McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff, covers patent law with substantial depth and scope. His topics range from new lawsuits to interesting inventions, but his first goal is to review every appellate opinion directly related to patent law, most regulatory and legislative changes, and some district court opinions.

• Phosita, at www.okpatents.com/phosita. A group blog written by lawyers at Dunlap, Codding & Rogers, Oklahoma City, Okla., its name comes from the patent-law term for a mythical person of ordinary skill in the art to whom an invention, in order to be patentable, must not be obvious. They seek to write about IP news "that may be of interest to the Phosita in each of us."

• Promote the Progress, at http://www.promotetheprogress.com/. Maintained by J. Matthew Buchanan, a lawyer in Perrysburg, Ohio, the blog focuses on intellectual property and technology law issues.

• TechLawyer, http://lawyerinparadise.typepad.com/techlawyer. With straw hat, shades and Hawaiian shirt, this IP and technology lawyer from Honolulu provides his thoughts on developments in law, business and politics.

• The Importance of ..., www.corante.com/importance. Former president and co-founder of Yale Law School's Law and Technology Society, and founder of the technology law and policy news site LawMeme, Ernest Miller is a fellow of Yale's Information Society Project, where he writes about IP, Internet law and First Amendment issues.

• Trademark Blog, http://trademark.blog.us/blog. New York City lawyer Martin Schwimmer offers news and commentary about U.S. and international trademark and domain name issues. Former general counsel to NameEngine Inc., a domain name services company, Schwimmer is vice president of the Intellectual Property Constituency of ICANN.

• Two-Seventy-One Patent Blog, http://271patent.blogspot.com/. Peter Zura, a patent attorney in Chicago, maintains this blog, devoted to "changing the world of patents and IP one blog at a time."

Ambrogi is the author of the revised and expanded second edition of The Essential Guide to the Best (and Worst) Legal Sites on the Web, now available at www.lawcatalog.com.
Author: "Duncan (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 12:18
分享的力量 自由軟體與開放文本
2004/11/15

自由軟體的哲學深信使用者有執行、複製、散佈、學習、變更、以及改善軟體的自由;而開放文本的哲學則把這樣的想法更進一步地推及所有的創作,認為讀者擁有展示(演出)、複製、散佈、學習、變更、以及改善文章、圖片、音訊、視訊或任何媒體文本的自由。
很多人會把自由軟體 (Free Software) 跟免費軟體 (Freeware) 混淆在一起,然而它們其實很不一樣。免費軟體指的是使用者毋須花錢就能取得、使用的軟體,但是通常使用者也就祇有使用的權利而已,並不能把取得的軟體另行散佈、販賣,也沒辦法取得程式的源碼(當然技術上來說可以藉由反組譯或其他逆向工程來完成,但這通常也是被授權條款所禁止的)來加以研究,也不被允許修改程式碼的任何部分。甚至,有些免費軟體也會在授權條款裏額外加上使用限制:諸如禁止商業使用、禁止在特定國家使用等等。我們可以說,使用者雖然沒有付錢,但卻沒有真正的自由。
另一方面,自由軟體強調的則是自由。根據自由軟體基金會的定義 (http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html) ,自由軟體的概念可以更精細地拆解成四項自由:
第零自由:不管目的為何都能執行程式的自由。
第一自由:學習程式如何運作的自由,以及將這項知識挪為己用的自由。
第二自由:重新散佈程式副本的自由。
第三自由:改進程式,並把妳所做的努力公開釋出,而讓整個社群受益的自由。
這四個自由確保了使用者有執行程式的自由、取得程式源碼 (source code) 的自由、研究源碼的自由、修改源碼的自由、使用源碼的自由、把程式源碼編譯成二進制可執行檔 (binary) 的自由、修改程式的自由、以及重新散佈(包括販售)程式的自由。雖然使用者總是有辦法不花錢就取得自由軟體,但自由軟體卻仍然保證了使用者可以把軟體重新包裝、加以販售的自由。這裏的自由,更實際地來說,就是指使用者可以做這些事,而毋須過問任何其他人,也不用因此而付出額外的代價。
在自由軟體基金會的精神裏,他們深信當人們有隨意把玩、炫耀的自由時,社群纔能獲利;或者說,當人們能夠自由地與他人分享時,他們自然而然地會互助合作,共享知識、智慧與資源,讓程式更臻完美。
就算對於平凡的使用者來說,選擇自由軟體(而不選擇商用軟體)的一個保障就是,妳永遠都會有任意執行軟體的自由,而這個自由會被保障不被褫奪,這跟會偷偷變更授權條款的商業軟體是很大的不同。另一方面,永遠都會有人願意繼續維護這個程式,不會祇是因為有甚麼公司被併購、倒閉,或者作者出了意外,就使得軟體被迫停止發展跟維護。而這一切的根源都來自於使用者擁有完整的、分享的自由。
在網路上把玩軟體的人們,自然對於網路這塊新世界有著烏托邦式的理想,瞭解分享的力量,纔有了自由軟體運動。之後,人們(尤其是從事文藝創作的人們)逐漸體認到分享的力量不僅限於軟體程式,更囊括了各式各樣的創作;於是開放文本(Open Content) 運動也隨之興起。
所謂的開放文本,追求的也是使用媒體文本(或說,媒體的實際內容)的自由,也就是要求各種媒體創作品都以不受限的授權/形式加以出版,或者直接成為公共領域 (Public Domain) 的一部份,讓這些內容得以被任意的複製及使用。
開放文本的哲學就跟自由軟體類似,相信人類文明的累積仰賴於大量公共領域裏的智慧結晶,認為祇有當人們能夠自由地取用前人的創作成果,纔會有更多的創作出現。如果格林童話不是公共領域的文化資產,那麼華特‧迪士尼 (Walt Disney) 就沒有題材能夠做出膾炙人口的史上第一部彩色長篇卡通《白雪公主》,更沒有日後其他許許多多的卡通了;諷刺的是迪士尼公司現在卻千方百計地不讓他們的作品成為公共領域的智慧財,有志之士於是發起了「拯救米老鼠運動」,想要讓米老鼠(和其他的動畫智慧財)投奔自由的公共領域。
除此之外,由於著作物的種類繁多,加上每個人當時當地的情境各有不同,開放文本的理想被以多種不同的方式所實踐。就最具體的授權條款來說,創意公用授權條款 (Creative Commons License) 當中就有一種創意公用公共領域授權條款 (Creative Commons: Public Domain) ,另外還有設計科學授權條款 (Design Science License) 、 GNU 自由文件授權條款 (GNU Free Documentation License) 、開放出版物授權條款 (Open Publication License) 、開放目錄計畫授權條款(Open Directory Project License) 、開放遊戲授權條款 (Open Game License) 、開放文本授權條款 (Open Content License) 等。
這些不同授權方式的著眼點、細節各異,但目的無非是要保障使用的自由、複製的自由、散佈的自由,以及創作的自由。他們認為不論是文章、圖片、音訊、視訊、遊戲、目錄、任何出版物、乃至於任何媒體文本,都應該確保讀者們有這樣的自由,能夠任意地展示、演出、播放、複製、散佈、從中學習、加以變更、繼續改善、並且回饋社會;唯有如此,他們深信,纔是人類全體的福祉。
任何從事創作(那怕祇是隨手寫些札記或心得也好)的人都該認真考慮這些授權的方式,閱讀、使用這些創作品的人更要好好理解、接受這些授權方式;因為自由的權利仍然需要靠自己去爭取,纔能享用到。
當然有些授權方式或自由運動/開放運動相當地偏激,甚至會被比喻成「跟病毒一樣,一沾上就擺脫不掉」,反而可能為了保障自由而再加諸了使用的限制,失去了真正徹底的自由。礙於篇幅的關係,這些顧慮我們無法在此一一說明白,但是之後將會以專文再繼續介紹「創意公用授權條款」這個當前最具彈性、同時也最具效力的授權方式,讓妳知道妳手上其實有著多少權利。
參考鏈結:
‧創意公用授權條款 (Creative Commons License):
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/
‧創意公用公共領域授權條款 (Creative Commons: Public Domain):
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/publicdomain/
‧設計科學授權條款 (Design Science License):
http://www.rare-earth-magnets.com/magnet_university/design_science_license.htm
‧GNU 自由文件授權條款 (GNU Free Documentation License):
http://www.fsf.org/licenses/fdl.html
‧開放出版物授權條款 (Open Publication License):
http://opencontent.org/openpub/
‧開放目錄計畫授權條款 (Open Directory Project License):
http://dmoz.org/license.html
‧開放遊戲授權條款 (Open Game License):
http://www.opengamingfoundation.org/ogl.html
‧開放文本授權條款 (Open Content License):
http://opencontent.org/opl.shtml
Author: "Duncan (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 11:52
網路經濟中的法律困境
2004/09/27

趙福軍╱北京特稿
網路對現實世界的衝擊可謂是空前絕後,幾乎現實世界中可以找到的,在網路世界中都可以找到其對應物:網路經濟、電子政務、網路遊戲、電子郵件、網路論壇、網路交友,更令人啼笑和深思的是網路婚姻、網路職業代罵、網路遊戲職業玩家也層出不窮。現代都市人的生活真的被網路“一網打盡”。
網路世界雖然虛擬,但卻是新時代的“淘寶聖地”,短短的幾年,網路造就了網易丁磊、搜狐張朝陽、盛大陳天橋等一大批網路巨富,從而吸引了大批的風險資本投資家的眼球。國內幾大門戶網站的崛起、從燒錢走向獲利,一方面說明瞭網路經濟的“寒冷冬天”已經過去;但另一方面卻也從某種程度上凸顯了我國網路經濟的“軟肋”尤其是號稱構成門戶網站獲利支柱的網路簡訊、網路遊戲、網路廣告更始面臨法律的困境。
網路簡訊欺陷何時了?
自從2000年移動和聯通推出短資訊業務以來,簡訊迅速的造就了“拇指經濟”的神話。這也對網路經濟帶了新的加值獲利通路,各地的網路內容服務商、SP競相進入。網路簡訊已與網路遊戲、網路廣告成為網路經濟獲利的基本模式。記得當年新浪的董事長姜豐年曾經說過:網路廣告、簡訊、網路遊戲是門戶獲利的三大支柱。“簡訊在中國成功最關鍵的因素是‘移動夢網’的商業模式。中國移動與SP的15%和85%的分成模式極大地刺激了SP,也讓SP走出了一條與Yahoo!、AOL不同的獲利模式。”TOM互聯網集團總經理王雷雷說,“這種可持續的獲利模式比單一依靠互聯網廣告這種獲利模式更穩固。美伊戰爭和“非典”期間對於簡訊、多媒體簡訊、WAP、JAVA業務的使用的大幅增加,都反映出人們對移動加值業務的習慣和需求。”
據統計,簡訊業務在03年的市場份額達到27.7億人民幣,今年將達到44億元人民幣,預計到06年將達到106億人民幣。但簡訊成功的背後卻是以具大的違法風險為代價的,這兩年3.15的投訴最多的可能就要數簡訊業務了。各種違反法律、行政法規、充斥色情、暴力、迷信、擾亂社會秩序、破壞民族團結的網路簡訊漫天飛舞;簡訊騷擾成為繼性騷擾、信(電子郵件)騷擾之後的第三大騷擾;通過簡訊傳播侵犯他們著作權、隱私權、商業秘密、生活安寧權的事件時有發生;網路簡訊詐騙等違法活動更是猖獗。雖然《中華人民共和國電信條例》,《全國人大關於維護互聯網安全的決定》,《中華人民共和國資訊服務管理辦法》等法規都可以用來對網路簡訊進行規治,但是法律的滯後性,司法的保守性都使得簡訊違法、侵權現象不斷,雖然今年4月20日信息產業部出台了《關於規範簡訊服務有關問題的通知》的部委規章,但筆者上網一搜索卻發現各種簡訊欺詐的新聞報導仍然是數不勝數:各種以情色、葷段子、低級為內容的簡訊充斥各大網站;各種打著中獎、贈送話費、捆綁消費的陷阱讓消費者不知所措,各種以代繳稅金、郵費、保險費等名義的簡訊欺騙,更是讓受害人痛恨無比。筆者隔壁的哥們接二連三的收到中特大六合彩的簡訊,讓其丈二和尚摸不到頭腦。
雖然面對違規經營的SP,中國移動先後也作過相應的處罰,過去1個月中,中國移動通信集團公司已經對20多家公司進行了制裁並罰款,幾天前,新浪網又從中國移動通信集團公司處接到一份處罰通知,原因是其無線音信互動服務(IVR)內容涉嫌違規,並存在擅自增加電話號碼的行為。但巨大的利益誘惑,連鎖利益的牽扯使得電信公司與網路營運公司、SP之間的關係十分曖昧。按照移動夢網SP合作管理辦法,SP有責任保證向用戶提供及時準確、真實可靠及合法的和健康的資訊。SP提供的網上自編簡訊業務,必須對資訊內容進行過濾,以便從源頭上杜絕各種有害資訊。SP必須對此類資訊的發送量進行核查,限制用戶的群發數量,每次不超過兩條,每天不超過200條。可以說從技術上SP是有能力從內容上控制給中違法、不良簡訊的,但由於合作協定僅僅屬於合約,不具有法律的約束力和強制懲罰力度,因此制定相應的法律約束機制才是解決的根本之道。
誰來保護我的虛擬財產?
自2000年第一款網路遊戲《萬王之王》出版以來,網路遊戲很快成為經濟的一個新的成長點。根據新聞出版總署發佈的有關調查報告,2003年,我國網路遊戲用戶達1380萬戶,比2002年成長63。8%;消費市場規模達13。2億元,比2002年成長45。8%,同時帶動電信服務、IT設備製造等關聯行業成長近150億元。據CNNIC2004年1月發佈的《中國互聯網路發展狀況統計報告》,用戶平均每周上網玩網路遊戲的時間為11.3小時。據不久前“第十四次中國互聯網路發展狀況統計報告顯示,截止到2004年6月30日,我國上網用戶總數為8,700萬,比去年同期成長27。9%,上網電腦達到3630萬台。
這一切都表明我國已經成為了網路大國、更是網路遊戲的大國。網路遊戲已成為了拉動相關經濟尤其網路經濟成長的有利動力。但是網路遊戲的迅速發展相伴隨的卻是大量的糾紛的出現,比如因虛擬財產被盜引發的玩家與盜竊者之間、玩家與營運商之間的糾紛;因虛擬物品交易中的欺詐行為引起的糾紛;因營運商停止營運引發的虛擬財產方面的糾紛;因遊戲資料丟失損害到虛擬財產而引起的糾紛;因使用外掛帳號被封引起的虛擬財產糾紛。歸根結底就是如何來通過法律保護我們的虛擬財產的問題。
由於思想觀念、國家政策的影響,網路遊戲行業的相關立法並沒有象盛大的“傳奇”一樣創造出網路立法的“奇跡”,就是對於網路遊戲中虛擬財產的性質、價值的認定和評估機構和方法、立法保護模式、糾紛解決機制都存在著爭論,這都使得網路遊戲行業無法真正的走向成熟,其實從網路遊戲踏如中國的那一天起,就面臨著法律的困境,比如遊戲合約的法律問題,營運代理中的法律問題,遊戲軟體中的智慧財產權的法律問題,網路環境中證據的法律問題,這一切法律的滯後,導致了糾紛發生後,當事人不知道如何是好,不知道如何尋求法律的救濟。
一個產業的成熟,除了看其是否有穩定的產業鏈外,另外一個很重要的方面就是是否具有一個穩定的法律環境,而我國至今沒有制定出一部全面規範網路遊戲的法規。因此當玩家的虛擬財產被盜竊,被欺詐,被營運商封號,無從提起訴訟,因為我們的法律對虛擬財產是否屬於一種公民的合法財產沒有明文的定性。號稱“網路虛擬財產第一案”的李宏晨訴北極冰也是以營運商沒有提供一個安全,穩定的營運環境為名,要求營運商回復玩家的虛擬財產,但是任何營運商都不可能提供絕對安全,穩定的遊戲營運環境,這在技術上也是不可能的,因此玩家虛擬財產仍然無法得到保護。虛擬財產得不到法律的承認,則虛擬財產的交易就的不到法律的保護,然而線下虛擬財產的交易已經初具規模,在這種情況下,當出現交易欺詐,如何處理?當出現交易糾紛,如何確定交易標地的價值,是按照交易的市場價格還綜合考慮玩家消費點卡價值,上網時間,花費的精力,汗水來確定?面對大量的私服,外掛等違法行為,如何給予法律的規治?如何更好的保護著作權人和營運商的利益?因此可以說,沒有成熟的法律來為遊戲產業保駕護航,網遊產業的反站仍然是令人擔憂的,仍然是糾紛,矛盾重重的。
另外,盛大與韓國ACTOZ之間對《傳奇》的代理糾紛雖然告一段落,但是卻明確告訴國內的遊戲營運公司,研究開發具有自主智慧財產權的網路遊戲才是成功的關鍵;大量網路遊戲營運商的蜂擁進入與玩家數量的一定期間的有限性、玩家時間和精力、金錢的有限性都使得網路遊戲行業是一個兩極分化的行業,是存在巨大的“馬太效應”的行業,更是一個充滿了風險的行業。這更需要相關的立法給予規治,使得行業走向良性的發展道路。
網路廣告能信嗎?
網路廣告是指在互聯網上發佈的以數位代碼為載體的各種經營性廣告。由於其打破了傳統廣告的“一對多”的傳播模式,使得廣告受眾與廣告主、廣告發佈者之間能夠形成更好的互動;再加上網路廣告發佈的低成本、內容的個性化、多樣化[例如從不同的角度可以將網路廣告區分為:橫幅式廣告(Banner.),按鈕式廣告(Button),郵件列表廣告(Direct Marketing),牆紙式廣告(Wall paper),插頁式廣告(Interstitial Ads)和互動遊戲式廣告(Interactive Games)等。]、效果的可預測化(例如可以通過計算點擊率,訪問量預測)、範圍的全球化,使得網路廣告一躍成為互聯網經濟的頂梁柱,大有將傳統廣告取而代之的意味。但也正是這些優點導致了大量的垃圾廣告、欺詐廣告充斥其間,時不時的侵犯消費者的權益,而現存的廣告立法又不能及時的對此作出反應,再加上其傳播的廣泛性、迅捷性,危害性個是巨大的,長期如此迴圈,必將後患無窮。
之所以會出現虛假廣告、垃圾廣告泛濫,很大程度上是和現今的立法滯後相關的,由於現存的《廣告法》制定於互聯網進入我國民間以前,因此就不可能合理的遇見到網路世界中會發生的一些問題,尤其是網路技術的飛速發展,更使得法律的保守性與技術的快速發展之間的矛盾凸顯出來:
首先,主體定位與相應從業資格認證制度的缺失。在現實世界中傳統的廣告業務中的相關主體的劃分是十分明確的,例如我國的《廣告法》第2條規定:“本法所稱廣告主,是指為推銷商品或者提供服務,自行或者委託他人設計、製作、發佈廣告的法人、其他經濟組織或者個人。本法所稱廣告發佈者,是指為廣告主或者廣告主委託的廣告經營者發佈廣告的法人或者其他經濟組織。”這樣就明確的將廣告主體區分為三類,分別是廣告主、廣告經營者、廣告發佈者,並根據其不同的地位賦予不同的權利和義務,對其從業資格做了相應的規定,以利相關部門對其具體的行為進行監管。但對於網路廣告,由於其存在於一個虛擬的空間中,製作、經營、發佈廣告變得極為簡單,於是越俎代庖的事時有發生:或是集三者職權於一身,或是越權經營、發佈廣告,從而使廣告主、廣告經營者、廣告發佈者間的界限越發模糊。ISP多是集廣告經營者與廣告發佈者兩種角色於一身,宣傳企業自身產品或服務的網站則將廣告主,廣告經營者和廣告發佈者三種角色集於一身,甚至任何擁有網路使用權的人都可以在網上發佈廣告。在主體定位不明確的情況下,《廣告法》中關於各方權利義務關係的規範就難以繼續適用於網路廣告中。從而使得網路虛假廣告,垃圾廣告泛濫成災。
其次.以不正當競爭為目的發佈網路廣告與違法發佈隱性廣告。網路是一種注意力經濟,靠的是吸引廣大網友的眼球創造收益。因此更多的吸引網友的注意就成了許多商家不斷追求目標。在利益的驅動下,就有可能以不正當競爭的方式發佈網路廣告或違反法律規定發佈隱性廣告。例如採用Frame加框技術分割網頁視窗,將他人網站呈現在自己網站上,當瀏覽者點擊超鏈結時,他人網站上的內容會出現在此網站某一區域,而此網站頁面上的廣告則始終呈現在瀏覽者面前,而且地址欄中網址仍是原網站的,讓瀏覽者誤以為鏈結的內容是網站自身的一部分。這種做法直接降低了被鏈結網站的廣告的瀏覽量,等於避開了該網站的廣告直接進入相關內容,構成了廣告侵權,是網路廣告經營中的不正當競爭。再例如我國《廣告法》明確規定廣告應當具備可識別性,能夠使消費者辨明其為廣告,大眾傳播媒介不得以新聞報導形式發佈廣告,通過大眾傳播媒介發佈廣告應當有廣告標記,與其他非廣告資訊相區別,不得使消費者產生誤解。網路廣告作為廣告的一種形式,同樣應符合這些規定,然而網路廣告中採取隱蔽形式如以新聞形式、討論問題的形式發佈廣告以規避法律和欺騙消費者。
複次,網路垃圾廣告困擾廣大的郵件用戶。由於通過電子郵件的方式發送廣告的成本是非常低的,而且速度快,覆蓋面廣,因此吸引了大批的靠群發垃圾廣告獲利的營運商,可以說這些發送大量垃圾廣告的行為不但是一種發送垃圾郵件的行為,屬於反垃圾郵件法的管理範圍;另一方面也可能涉及虛假廣告欺騙消費者,侵犯消費者隱私權、知情權的情況。濫發垃圾廣告郵件會給用戶和商家都帶來了很大的損失,它不僅佔用了頻寬,浪費了網路資源,浪費了用戶的時間和金錢,而且郵件服務商與政府每年要投入大量資金來治理郵件垃圾。尤其是對用戶而言,其郵箱可能因大量垃圾郵件充斥其間而致使重要郵件無法接收到。在電子商務時代,一封郵件可能蘊涵著重要的商業價值,其遲發或接收不到都可能帶來重大的損失,甚至引發法律糾紛。
最後,網路廣告糾紛的管轄與法律適用問題重重。由於網路的天然全球性,使得任何互聯網糾紛都可能涉及任何國家的管轄與法律適用,當一則網路廣告侵權糾紛發生時,如何確定管轄權?應該適用那個國家的法律?尤其是當各國的管轄權規則與法律規定不一的情況下,情況就會更加複雜。即使一國依靠自己的國家的管轄權規則和法律規則作出判決,是否能夠得到別的國家的承認和執行?正是這種法律管轄與適用的國際性衝突使得一些商家有意規避法律,使得網路廣告很難通過一國的法律來解決,往往需要通過國家間的協作來共同解決,甚至可以由國際性機構制定統一的具有約束力的規則。由此使得網路廣告處於一種缺乏控制的狀態,網上成為發佈虛假廣告的沃土。於是網上虛假廣告的大量出現也就不可避免了,這極大地損害了消費者的利益,也給社會的競爭秩序造成了不良的影響。
可以說無論是虛假網路廣告還是違法的垃圾廣告與隱性網路廣告都損害了消費者的權益,特別是加大了消費者實現其知情權、公平交易權的難度,也增大了消費者救濟其權益的難度。
因此若僅僅以傳統的《廣告法》、《消費者權益保護法》來規範保護,以傳統的監管手段來管理網路廣告,顯然是力所不能及的。若一味聽之任之,從表面上看僅是網路廣告市場的混亂,但長此以往,最終的後果不但是損害消費者的利益,損害國家的競爭秩序、而且最終損害的是網路經濟的生命力。因此通過制定新的網路廣告法律來規範網路廣告是當務之急。筆者認為在立法中作好以下幾點是十分必要的:
一 加快完善有關法規。
特別是要針對網上的虛假廣告、以不正當競爭式發佈廣告、以隱性或引誘方式發佈網路廣告行為,制定特殊的規則,及時納入規範之列。或者通過修訂現有的《廣告法》、《反不正當競爭法》、《消費者權益保護法》,使其網路化;或者單獨指定網路廣告法以及反垃圾郵件法。
二 建立相應的網路廣告監管機制。
制定出了法規卻不能很好的執行,法規充其量只是一具空文,只有加強日常性的,非突擊式的監管才是重中之重。由於網路技術性含量很高,因此就需要監管機關和手段也必須科技化、網路化。監管機制多種多樣,或是賦予現有的監管機構新的監管網路廣告的職權,或是賦予網路服務供應商一定的監管權力,因為他們一般和網路廣告有直接的聯繫,實行監管有其方便之處,或是建立新的監管機構並設置相應的監管體系如網上投訴網路。
三 制定行業規範,提倡業者自律。
網路廣告主體和經營者在經營活動過程中,應當樹立自律的觀念。自律要求他不能僅僅考慮自身的利益,而且還要照顧消費者的利益,尊重消費者的人格和消費者依法享有的各項權利,並以此來約束自己的行為,真實地履行自己的義務。特別應當對網路服務提供商的義務給予規範。
四 加強國際司法協助領域的合作。
由於網路的全球性,無國界性,使得在對網上虛假廣告及通過網路廣告侵犯消費者權益的法律適用上出現國際間的法律管轄與適用的衝突問題,這就需要世界各國通力合作,在對一些共同的、基本的問題上達成共識後,通過簽訂雙邊協定、多邊協定甚至國際公約等國際合作的方式予以解決。
從以上的分析我們不難看出:網路簡訊、網路遊戲、網路廣告雖然號稱門戶網站獲利的主要支柱,但是卻都面臨著法律治理或保障的空白,加之政策的隨意性和變動性更加造就了網路經濟處於“爆發戶階段”,風險無處不在,所形成的產業鏈也並不成熟,網路呼喚規則的治理,網路經濟更需要法律制度的保障和規範,走出困境,從而走向成熟。

【文稿來源:ChinaByte授權,武陵客代理】
Author: "Duncan (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 11:48
創意共享(CC):數位時代的創意棲息地
2004/10/06

編按:本文介紹Creative Commons(簡稱CC,創意共享授權),已在台灣獲得許多學術界、藝文界人士嚮應支持,音樂人朱約信即為一例。其製作的Creative Commons Taiwan音樂專輯,以「歡迎來唱我的歌」作為【CC Taiwan計畫】主題歌,網友可前往下載
從麻省理工學院的「開放教材」(Open CourseWare)到英國BBC的開放新聞資料庫,全球創意保育運動如火如荼地展開,台灣的商業體系能否獲得啟發而有所作為?
Creative Commons(創意共享,底下簡稱CC)的授權條款於2002年發布,台灣隨即加入iCommons國際合作,今年9月4日中研院資訊所在台北舉辦正式發表會。在全球CC創意文化運動中台灣的步伐算是相當活潑而積極,完全不輸給其他二十多個初期發起國家。當天CC創辦人Lawrence Lessig教授親自來台發表「自由文化」的演說,音樂人朱約信、翻譯名家朱學恆、以及創作CD-PRO II的劉裕銘先生都以自身經驗現身說法。所謂CC,其實是個非常簡單的觀念,卻有著改變數位時代創作體制的巨大潛能,值得任何關心創意經濟與文化發展的人們留意。
CC提供創作者自由選擇授權形式的可能,也解放了使用者「再創作」的自由
1980年代後期,各國著作權法在美國的推動下,逐漸往賦予作品在創作完成時自動「保留所有權利」(All right reserved)的方向發展。這同時也意味著,使用者必須要負擔「取得授權」的完全責任。這種法律調整有鼓勵創作的背景存在,它快速放大了授權交易的規模,在創作人之間安插了大量的中間人(譬如:律師),卻也因此埋伏了窒息數位時代創作文化的危險因子。
拜數位科技與網際網路之賜,創作品取得、再製、傳送的成本變得極低。數位時代核心的創作品,「資訊」而非「實體」,先天上便具有「公共財」無排他性與競爭性的特性。出於避免創作誘因不足的理由,著作權法的產權控制與軟體碼的技術控制日趨嚴密。其結果是兩種極端主義的對抗僵局:一邊是越來越嚴苛的著作權管制主義,另一邊是越來越囂張的盜版無政府主義。對方各自成為自身強化武裝的理由,造成了相互增強的惡性循環。
數位網路時代究竟有沒有「第三條路」?有,那就是CC的理論與實踐!立法院剛在艾利颱風中通過甚至比歐美國家更加嚴苛的著作權法修正。除了因為美國貿易制裁的壓力,不外是為了「抑制盜版」與「鼓勵創新」。但是,從CC的角度來看,這兩個理由不見得成立,強化著作權法律保護並非是唯一、正確的解決途徑。
CC的替代方案平淺而務實。相對於「保留全部權利」對「取得授權」高築的困難度與對「合理使用」的壓縮,CC鼓勵創作者就一定的授權組合中選擇「保留部分權利」(some right reserved),讓使用者可以自動取得再製及衍生新創作的授權。這樣一來,也就將著作權法所引入的大量「中間人」給移開。這些授權組合的要件包括「姓名標示」、「禁止改作」、「非商業性」與「相同分享」。
換言之,在保留一定著作權(譬如:姓名標示)與在特定條件(譬如:非商業)下,CC授權條款解放了公眾自由使用的範圍。CC提供了創作者自由選擇授權形式的可能,也解放了使用者「再創作」的自由,是個兩全其美的作法。數位科技的潛能不必然要導向盜版氾濫,它賦予我們的創作潛力可以被正面地釋放到「創意公共園地」(creative commons),這個Lessig所謂在財產與法律控制之外,孕育與激發創意的「自由空間」。
CC並不僅止於技術層次的授權調整,作為捍衛數位時代「自由文化」全球運動的一支,它其實深刻地挑戰著我們不知不覺中被灌輸的經濟常識。
CC讓創作端的創作熱情可以發揮,分享與回饋更激發創意的內在動力
什麼是「創作」?創作是對過去累積創作的重新組合。塗鴉、剪輯、合成、拼貼,
Creativity is about Remix! 學習能量與速度最快的兒童成天不都專心玩這些?「數位時代」常跟「創意想像」劃上等號,正是因為數位媒體允許我們重溫童玩時期的那種創作自由,不是嗎?當下的使用者是未來的創作者,當下的創作者都是過去的使用者。CC讓創作端的創作熱情可以發揮,讓消費端的創意自由不受壓抑,因為它理解,創意文化需要的是這兩種身份的人群間熱情而緊密的互動。
創意的動力在哪裡?「全部權利保留」出自於一個簡單的回答:金錢是激發創意最核心且有效的誘因,而強化著作權法可以確保並擴大它。但這其實是對「創意」非常窄化的理解。全球已有數百萬的企業、藝術家和創作人採用了Creative Commons授權條款,創意社群在全球蔓延,風潮持續燃燒。她們都為了什麼?事實上如果我們細心觀察,創意不必然,也不主要,跟金錢上的報償有關。分享與回饋、成就感與感動、成長與尊嚴,都是更能激發創意的內在動力。CC是創作者在網路上邀約分享的友善訊號:「歡迎來唱我的歌」!(朱約信的CC授權歌曲)
「公共財」是問題?經濟顯學告訴我們,公共財先天有效率問題,如果我們可以透過像著作權法的整備與程式碼的控制,彌補它作為「不完整商品」的缺憾(掛上價格!),那麼市場會刺激出創意的最大化。然而,這種思考直接造成「公共財」的萎縮,反而是數位時代創意文化的警訊。創意需要公共領域(public domain)的滋養,而非誕生於律師與經紀人間的授權談判。透過「部分保留權利」與「合理使用」的善意互動,創意才能在法律與商業控制之外的自由空間,找到活潑繁衍的棲息地。
CC的目標是從創作者的「私人權利」出發,建構出彈性合理的著作權層次
CC台北發表會的前一天,剛好是美國《荒野法案》通過的40週年,這種巧合對正經歷土石流、地層下陷、淹水缺水磨難的台灣,隱然是一種啟寓。商業活動只是人類社會的表層,市場有其非市場的基礎。著作權固然可以像「價格抽水泵」般拿來汲取創意、累積利潤,但是如果一昧地加壓授權的槓桿,開發過度擠壓到創意棲息地,會不會竭澤而漁,造成文化生機的地層下陷?
聰明的捕魚人應該懂得護溪的道理,適當運用像CC授權這種「私人權利」的調整去灌溉保育更多的「創意公共財」,才是深耕文化資產的商業遠見。台灣的商業體系是否能夠從麻省理工學院的「開放教材」(Open CourseWare)到英國BBC的開放新聞資料庫,如火如荼展開的全球CC創意保育運動中找到啟發而有所作為?
儘管進入後工業的數位時代,我們對於文明進步的想像卻往往還深陷在「大有為政府」與「完美市場」間拔河的「冷戰」思維。80年代隨著共產陣營崩潰,「市場想像」暴走,到處宣稱意識型態上的勝利。這種思維面對CC運動,一種常見的慣性攻擊聲稱它「反財產」(anti-property),是自由的敵人。這種說詞其實是經濟保守主義者召喚冷戰恐懼的過時詭辯。
CC不走極端主義,它的目標不過是,從創作者的「私人權利」出發,建構出彈性合理可行的著作權層次,用創造雙贏與更多的選擇自由,來解放數位科技的創意潛能,累積數位時代更多元豐富的「公共財」儲量。商業與法律、市場與政府、程式碼與著作權日益緊密的結合,正慢慢窒息數位時代的創意生機。在「市場」與「政府」之外「想像社會」,最終才是數位時代「脫冷戰」的創意挑戰!
Author: "Duncan (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 11:25
數位圖書館挑戰著作權法
2004/12/07

張樊╱北京特稿
近日鄭成思等7名智慧財產權專家起訴書生公司,指控書生公司違反了著作權法,未經其授權就在“書生之家數位圖書館”中擅自使用他們的作品。這次起訴的原告是在我國智慧財產權法研究方面大名鼎鼎的7位專家,再次引爆了我們對數位圖書館的著作權問題的關注。
數位圖書館著作權風起雲湧
這7位專家針對數位圖書館的著作權問題提出的訴訟在我國並不是第一例,北京大學法學院的陳興良早在2002年就起訴中國數位圖書館有限責任公司,首次向數位圖書館發出了維權行動,並且案件在2002年就已經審結,陳興良獲得了勝訴。只不過因為陳興良的研究領域在刑法學,並非智慧財產權法,而且是單兵作戰,影響沒有這次的訴訟大。就在鄭成思等7名智慧財產權專家這次起訴後,陳教授也加入到這個陣營裡,也以“書生之家數位圖書館”未經授權使用其作品,將書生公司推上了被告席。一時間,數位圖書館的著作權問題風起雲湧,如果越來越多的著作權人特別是法學界之外的其他人士參與其中,數位圖書館就到了生死存亡的時刻了。
陳興良教授在2002年針對中國數位圖書館有限責任公司提起了第一起維權訴訟,起訴被告未經其授權使用《當代中國刑法新視界》、《刑法適用總論》、《正當防衛論》等三部作品,侵犯了其著作權中的資訊網路傳播權,提出40萬元的賠償金額。面對訴訟,被告中國數位圖書館有限責任公司是以數位圖書館的公益性來做抗辯,這也引起了不少社會公眾的認可和同情。儘管陳教授沒有獲得40萬鉅額賠償,但官司勝訴了,法院認定了被告的侵權,判決了相應的賠償。
這次鄭成思等7名智慧財產權專家以及陳興良教授起訴書生公司,結果應該是很容易預料的,勝訴問題不大,書生公司又將會支付一筆賠償金。長此以往,在法學界之外眾多領域人士投身到這種訴訟中來,數位圖書館的運作恐怕就要出問題了。所以我們在網路作品的著作權問題因為最高人民法院的司法解釋和著作權法出台迎刃而解之後,數位圖書館的著作權問題成為網路著作權的又一個焦點問題。
數位圖書館的法律地位困境
我國目前的幾家數位圖書館,諸如數圖公司、超星公司、書生之家等,儘管具有一定的公益性,但都是按照商業模式來運作的,在著作權問題上就不可能享有與圖書館的同等待遇。
在法律上,認為圖書館是搜集、整理、收藏圖書資料供人閱覽參考的機構,其功能在於保存作品並向社會公眾提供接觸作品的機會。圖書館向社會公眾提供作品,對傳播知識和促進社會文明進步,具有非常重要的意義。只有特定的社會公眾(有閱覽資格的讀者),在特定的時間以特定的方式(借閱),才能接觸到圖書館向社會公眾提供的作品。因此,這種接觸對作者行使著作權的影響是有限的,不構成侵權。
所以圖書館為了保存的需要將作品數位化,或者大專院校圖書館將作品數位化後在館內及校園網內小範圍使用並只能瀏覽不能下載列印,在著作權法範圍內是許可的。2001年7月1日生效的韓國著作權法修正案中就規定,“數位圖書館”僅准許本館或他館的使用者通過電腦顯示器“閱讀”有著作權的作品,可以不經著作權人授權,但這種對著作權的限制不延及在圖書館內列印或下載作品的行為。
而我們現在的這些數位圖書館,按照商業模式來運作,用戶交費後在互聯網上就可以閱讀並下載列印,阻礙了著作權人以其認可的方式傳播作品,侵犯了其資訊網路傳播權。因此,我國的數位圖書館按照目前運作模式必須要經過著作權人的授權許可。
“一對一洽談版權”與“授權要約”
我國目前數位圖書館還帶有一定的公益性,為公眾通過互聯網接觸“圖書”提供方便,因此如何在保護著作權人權利與公眾利益之間尋找平衡,特別是在目前數位圖書館因著作權問題引發的糾紛越來越多的情況下。
目前國內業內有不少人提出了解決方法,主要有三:其一建立針對數位圖書館版權統一管理機構;其二修改著作權法,規定數位圖書館和網上傳播可以事先不經作者許可,事後向作者支付報酬,也就是類似於現行著作權法上的“轉載”;其三“授權要約”模式,即著作權在出書的同時發表一個要約,聲明著作權人的權利,並聲明別人在什麼樣的條件下可以使用,並通過代理機構向著作權人支付報酬。
對於第三種做法的支援呼聲最高,書生公司的一項調查表明,在何種版權授權方式更有利於數位內容產業發展的問題上,半數以上的被調查人選擇了授權要約,近1/3的人選擇了與版權代理機構集中簽約,與出版社簽約僅占19.5%,而支援與作者直接簽約的人最少,只有9.8%。
“授權要約”通過著作權人在作品發表時的要約就可以決定如何使用,有利於數位圖書館的發展,所以受到了較高的支援率,相比“一對一洽談版權”簡單可行,值得推廣。不過我們要注意,這種模式沒有實行之前,儘管數位圖書館能夠獲得社會的認同和支援,但其未經許可擅自使用他人作品屬於侵權行為,必須要採用“一對一洽談版權”模式來化解法律糾紛。
由此可以看出,鄭成思、陳興良等法學專家針對數位圖書館提出的訴訟,在我國網路智慧財產權法律發展歷程中是一件好事,不僅維護了自己的著作權利益,而且推動整個社會著作權保護的進步與發展,去解決新問題和新情況。

【文稿來源:ChinaByte授權,武陵客代理】
Author: "Duncan (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 11:09
劉韌談網路:WikiWiki快點快點
2004/08/24

劉韌╱北京特稿
“Wiki Wiki”一詞源於夏威夷語“wee kee wee kee”,意思是“快點快點”。Wiki發明人 WardCunningham 一次看到機場巴士上寫著“Wiki Wiki Bus”,大約是因為“快點快點”地催促暗合了這個系統迫切需要的參與精神,WardCunningham就用Wiki命名了以“知識庫文檔”為中心、以“共同創作”為手段,靠“眾人不停地更新修改”這樣一種借助互聯網創建、積累、完善和分享知識的全新模式。
理想
知識庫的意義不言而喻,它是人類傳承文明的主要方式。傳統知識庫的建立方式是,組織一批擁有這方面知識的專家,在特定的時間內編纂完成,並定期更新版本。其典型代表是百科全書、字典以及各種教材。
Wiki認為,用傳統方式製作知識庫,成本高,更新慢,所相信的所謂權威未必權威,Wiki利用互聯網將“一批專家”拓展到了每一個網民,將間歇式的版本更新,變成了時時更新。Wiki相信知識藏於民間,相信“更多眼睛會發現更多錯誤”,相信“給予個人自由,個人一定能用好這個自由”。
要實現Wiki理想的第一困難是,怎樣調動廣大網民無償奉獻自己知識的積極性?Wiki用開放、平等、自由、即時實現來回報廣大網民的參與,Wiki中的任何一條記錄,任何人在任何時候都可以現時修改。這種設計能最大限度降低網民參與編纂知識庫的成本,但它會引發Wiki的第二個難題,即誰來控制品質?誰來管理?就像相信民主一樣,Wiki相信參與編纂知識庫的維基(Wiki)人在“議事程式”“政策”、“行動指南”等共同約定的守則下,完全能夠管理好Wiki的品質和進程。
Wiki手中的另外一個利器是時間。它能夠用時間的積累來彌補業餘參與無法按計劃完成任務的不足。一個Wiki知識庫計劃一旦上線,只要伺服器不停,它就可以7×24不浪費一分一秒地積累下去,並且越往後,速度越快。
Wiki被迅速接受的另一個重要原因,就是隨著知識更新加快,人們越來越需要使用更為快捷的手段來創建、積累、分享彼此的知識。
創建
1995年,WardCunningham用Perl完成第一款Wiki程式WikiWikiWeb,並通過OSS(Open Source Software開放原始碼)方式免費共用。這之後,更多的程式師開發出了更多的開源Wiki系統,其中,Magnus Manske用PHP語言寫的Wikipedia,因為在其上面運行的維基百科取得的巨大成功,而一躍成為當今最流行的Wiki系統。這個系統當然也是不用付費的開源軟體。
http://wikipedia.sourceforge.net/下載安裝Wikipedia軟體後,就可以創建營運一個Wiki知識社區了。和所有互聯網專案一樣,第一步當然也是創建首頁。Wiki首頁內容主要由本知識庫的分類目錄組成。
由於Wiki用簡單的格式標記取代了複雜格式標記的HTML,所以,毋需美工,任何人通過簡單的學習都可以創建出一個標準的Wiki首頁。對於第一次創建Wiki首頁的人來說,最簡單的辦法是,複製其他Wiki的首頁,保留其形式,替換上自己的內容就可以算完成了。
由於Wiki首頁的創建者無法確保自己創建的這個目錄頁是最合理、最科學、最全面的,所以,他必須將修改Wiki首頁的權力賦予所有能看到這個首頁的人。當然,所有被修改、被替代的首頁,都會被保存在歷史記錄中,以便更正不恰當的修改。
由此便引申出,誰來決定“好壞”的問題。Wiki始終相信“在這個修改的過程中,可能產生不恰當,但它最終會被修正。”“大家最終會將一個文檔修改得更好,而不是更差。“因為”人們產生文檔的意義在於這些文檔能對大家有用,應該鼓勵任何人對文檔中的任何資訊進行自由修改和整理,以對自己或他人更加有用,因此任何過時或者不再被人關心的內容都會被人從Wiki上拿掉,更不用說那些明顯錯誤或者令人討厭的東西了。”Wiki系統當然同時也有對付惡意修改的手段,比如封其IP,使他無法再來到本Wiki。
接下來要做的就是,從分類目錄往下一層一層地編纂。這是一個工作量極大的工作,正因為這是一個龐大而非少數人在短時間內能完成的任務,所以才需要使用Wiki這種“共同創作”的方式。始於2001年1月15日的維基百科英文版,經過3年多時間,已積累了超過30萬個條目,是目前《大英百科全書》的三倍。按照這樣的發展速度,維基百科所收入的條目在未來數月內將達到100萬條,所用文字將多達50種,從阿拉伯語一直到蓋爾語。2004年6月,維基百科網站的點擊率為平均每天870萬,超過了《大英百科全書》網站。
中性
2002年3月,用戶ID24開始在英文維基百科發表許多“左傾”文章,他的激烈討論最終導致了嚴重的人身攻擊。維基百科於2002年4月禁止ID24對維基百科進行編輯(但仍允許繼續瀏覽)。同年9月,維基百科還停止了用戶“Helga”的編輯許可權,因為他經常在德國歷史的相關文章中發表親“右翼”觀點,並且導致多次爭論。
由於Wiki採用公眾維護同一個知識庫的方式,所以,它在編輯方針上就必須採用中性觀點,否則,Wiki就會像BBS一樣爭論不休。爭論、爭吵、爭執對BBS是求之不得的事情,但對Wiki卻不是好事。
中性觀點是指,遇到爭論時,儘量去“敘述”而不是去“採取某一特定的立場”。比如,不去斷言“上帝存在”,還是“上帝不存在”,而是敘述“大多數美國人相信上帝存在”這個實事。
另外,在敘述兩種對立觀點的時候,要都使用“正面的、同情的”語氣,而非一個用贊同語氣,另外一個僅僅用來當作被譏諷、被批判的靶子提及。
客觀也許難以做到,因為人是感性的,想要超然物外絕非易事,但中性容易做到。因為中性是技術的,和情感無關。只要能做到,使爭論兩方在閱讀最後的文字時,認為他們的觀點已經用最同情的語調,清楚、完整地陳述了出來,就算做到了中性。而要做到這些,只要執行可操作,可度量的流程就可以了,比如敘述對立觀點時,都使用同情語氣,篇幅大體相同,相關重要論據都齊全等。
今天,無數優秀的學者、百科全書家、課本作者基本上都在使用中性觀點寫作。Wiki系統注意到了人們習慣爭論的天性,在系統裡提供了討論功能,但這個討論頁僅僅是附著在知識庫頁,而非作為主頁提供。
管理員
自2002年起,開始有人惡意破壞維基百科,這些破壞當然都被更多的人很快修復,但維基百科最終還是將自己的首頁“保護”了起來,不再允許任意修改,而只允許管理員修改。這是維基百科對於開放的一次迫不得以的“向後”修正。Wiki系統其實能支援到每一級的“保護”,但從維基百科實踐看,對二級頁面的“保護”並沒有必要。
就像民主需要議會和議員一樣,Wiki也離不開“活雷鋒”一樣的管理員。其實,搭建Wiki系統、創建Wiki首頁的那個人就是本Wiki專案第一管理員。他接下來的任務是,一邊撰寫知識庫條目,一邊從自然參與者中挑選、發展、培養更多的管理員, 由這些管理員再發展出更多的管理員。
管理員的主要職責是,保護頁面、刪除頁面、復原頁面,查封與解封用戶,除了這些管理的工作之外,管理員更要身先士卒地撰寫條目,認真地編輯修改條目。一個Wiki專案的起始條目的編纂一般都是由管理員先完成,管理員的奉獻構成了一個Wiki專案最初的人氣,在這個基礎之上,Wiki專案才能向下滾雪球似地發展。
萬事開頭難,一個Wiki專案在開始的時候,一定沒有幾個條目,沒條目,當然沒人看;沒人看,當然沒人寫;沒人寫,當然沒條目,這是一個閉環。這個閉環要靠管理員初期艱苦的奉獻打破。一旦進入正迴圈,管理員就可以從撰寫條目的工作中解脫出來,從事更多的管理工作。
和BBS Blog不同
Wiki和BBS、Blog一樣都是將更多權力交給廣大網民的社區工具。BBS以話題為主線組織版面,表現方式是,註冊用戶在相應的版中發貼,跟貼;Blog是簡易的發佈系統,以個人為主線組織版面,表現方式是個人主頁;Wiki以知識點為主線組織版面,表現方式是,成千上萬個志願者在修改成千上萬個文檔。
Blog最強調個人,這個Blog是誰的,是這個Blog的第一屬性,所以,個人有動力維護自己的Blog,在自己的Blog上積累;BBS最強調互動,更像廣場集會,很多人圖得是熱鬧和一吐之快,積極發言;Wiki最強調共同創作,由無數人共同維護完善一個詞條。從這裡不難看出,參與Wiki的用戶要比參與BBS和Blog的人少得多,可能連1%都不到。Wiki不在於熱鬧,而在於它的成果--一個不斷完善的知識庫。享用這個知識庫的人要比為這個知識庫做貢獻的人多得多。
Wiki的積累性要比BBS和Blog強,BBS和Blog主要積累的是用戶,而用戶很容易流失,從而影響人氣,Wiki主要積累的是條目,所以,它可以穩定地發展,能確保訪問量一天比一天大。
接入網路媒體
對於網路媒體來說,Wiki能給它帶來的註冊用戶比之BBS和Blog,可以忽略不計,但Wiki所積累的知識庫,卻是網路媒多年夢寐以求又還未能得到的寶貴資源。
理論上,網路媒體可以利用海量存儲將所發佈的內容積累下來,但網路媒體使用CMS、Blog、BBS所產生和積累的內容,都很難修改,很難關聯。最後只好通過搜索,將一大堆結果雜亂地提交給用戶,讓用戶自己去篩選。
Wiki方式的知識庫不僅有序、關聯,而且能隨時更新、修改、完善,非常適合網路媒體構建知識庫。知識庫建設是網路媒體相比傳統媒體的一個巨大優勢。
網路媒體搭建Wiki最簡單的方式是,先創建本網路媒體主題Wiki計劃,主題Wiki又可被細化為多個按照網路媒體頻道區隔的頻道Wiki。比如一個IT門戶,主題Wiki計劃是IT百科,IT百科又可按照本網站的頻道劃分被分解為軟體百科、硬體百科、網路百科、數位百科、電信百科等。各個百科聚合成IT百科的Wiki首頁,各個百科的最經典條目和最新條目又同時散落在各個頻道之內。
由於Wiki知識庫一般是以短小的“關鍵字”形式出現,所以,很容易被提取到頻道的相關各處,甚至嵌入最終內容頁,用以增加Wiki條目被訪問的次數。
本頻道編輯自然是本Wiki的第一批管理員,同時也是Wiki內容編纂的主力,但讀者的加入會使Wiki架構更完整龐大,條目更細化、深入。永遠不要忽視讀者的力量,因為他們相比有限的編輯人數,是無窮多個;永遠不要忽視時間的積累,因為相比一個短暫任務,時間面向未來,無窮無盡。
相關網站連結:http://en.wikipedia.org/
http://en.wiktionary.org/

【文稿來源:ChinaByte授權,武陵客代理】
Author: "Duncan (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 11:07
Wiki與知識網路化
2004/09/03

全球資訊網 (World Wide Web, WWW) 一開始並不是打算做成今日妳我所看到的樣子。當年網路纔剛起步時,第一批網路世界的居民多半是從事研究的學者專家,存放在網路上的資訊也多半是學術著作或技術文件,這些文謅謅的東西就跟所有的學術著作一樣,自然地都帶有大量的旁徵博引。
每一篇文章都會有不少專有名詞,需要另外專文解釋;另外也會有大量摘錄或引用的句子,人們對於「超文字 (HyperText) 」的想像就在這樣的需求下誕生了:如果能夠有一套系統機制,能夠自動地把每個文章裏出現的專有名詞,連結到足以詮釋那個字眼的地方去,人們就不需要再花大量的時間來補足這些參考資訊了。
今日實做於 WWW 的超文字鏈結並不會自動產生,乃需要作者自己決定要連到哪裡去,並且把特定的標籤語法加諸於文件裏的特定位置。至於最初對「超文字」的理想,則一直到Wiki出現後,纔真的被實現。在圍紀的世界裡,每一個頁面都有一個「名字」,這個名字就是該頁面的中心主旨、頁面的內容都是為了要解釋這個名字而存在的;像這種被當作頁面名字的,姑且就稱做是「關鍵字」吧。任何時候,祇要在同一個圍紀系統裏,任何頁面中祇要提到了關鍵字,系統就會建立起鏈結,連到以該關鍵字所引領的特定頁面去。
精確地說來,在Wiki裏一個個的頁面就好像是散落在盤中的珍珠,這些珠子間用許多的細線織成綿密的網絡;然而這些細線卻非固定不動的,而是可能隨時產生也可能隨時消失的。當頁面裏出現了關鍵字時,細線就因應而生;當頁面裏的關鍵字被刪除後,細線也隨之消逝。妳可以把這些頁面抽象地當作是各式各樣的概念,各種概念間的關聯性也有可能像這樣被修改、被牽扯在一起、或被釐清。很多時候,在妳心中會是先冒出一個粗略而抽象的觀念,隨後纔由其他的知識或觀念來加以輔佐建構,表達出完整的意象;在Wiki系統裏,這也是建立新頁面的方式:妳先在某一個頁面裏提出關鍵字,以這個關鍵字為「名字」的頁面此刻就會憑空產生,之後妳纔去撰寫這個新頁面的內容。
為了要能夠反映出這種人類思緒的複雜與易動性,Wiki系統通常還多做了很多事。
Wiki這個字源自夏威夷土話,意思是「快」。各家Wiki系統莫不採行了各式各樣的手段,讓各種跟編修Wiki頁面有關的事情變得更快更簡單。通常常用的網頁排版效果,在Wiki裏都會有比較精簡而直觀的寫法,例如用星號(*)來建立清單、用兩次換列來換段等等;在關鍵字方面,多數Wiki系統都用了「Wiki字」來表達關鍵字。所謂的Wiki字指的是像 WikiWord 這樣的英文單字,在同一個字裏會有不祇一個字母大寫;除此之外,多數Wiki系統也可以拿一對中括號(也就是 [ 和 ] )來標示出關鍵字。任何關鍵字(不管是Wiki字或用中括號標示的關鍵字)都會自動變成一個鏈結,連到對應的Wiki頁面去。
Wiki系統還有一個詭異的特色,就是任何讀者都可以修改任何Wiki頁面的內容。這聽起來相當地不可思議,不過卻是Wiki的成功之處。Wiki的另一個哲學,是相信「真理越辯越明」;幾乎所有的Wiki系統都會把所有的頁面送到「版本管理系統」處理,這意味著任何頁面每一次的修改都有跡可尋:任何讀者不但能回溯到先前存在過的任何修訂版,還能夠比對任兩個版本間的異同。藉由這樣的有力依靠,Wiki讓所有的讀者都可以編修頁面內容──任何讀者要是覺得某個頁面的內容有誤解、有偏見、或不夠完善,都可以自己動手加以修正或補述;而且又不怕有人惡意把內容亂改一通或整個刪除,因為下一位讀者總是能夠回溯到先前完好的修訂版。
由於有這種特性,Wiki特別適合拿來當作特定團體的知識庫。當使用者以特定團體為主時,表示這些人彼此有交集,對於專有名詞的解讀有共識,會用到的「關鍵字」也比較集中而容易有牽連。在這個前提下,她們將能很快地把各自的概念化為一個個的關鍵字,透過Wiki系統把這些概念的關聯性表達出來,並且彼此截長補短,交織出更為綿密的知識脈絡來。日後不管從那個關鍵字作為開端,信手拈來的皆是一整張反映著眾人知識的脈絡網;「Wiki」這個字眼,就是代表著一群人「聚在一起寫東西」。
網際網路讓電腦間得以溝通,全球資訊網讓妳的文字不再孤獨,但是有了Wiki後,存在於妳頭腦裏的想法纔能獲得生命,跟其他人的想法一起活躍地舞動。Wiki系統很早之前就已經誕生了,祇是因為它的概念太過抽象而始終沒有成為主流;隨著人們對抽象事物的掌握能力越來越高,Wiki的運用範圍也越來越廣泛。許多企業或工作團隊,像是迪士尼或歐萊禮等,都拿Wiki系統做為內部的知識管理及專案管理之用;另外 Wikimedia Foundation 甚至利用Wiki做出了 Wikipedia (http://wikipedia.org/ ) 這個全世界最大的線上多語大百科。
知識本來就不是單純的線性關係,更非固定不變的架構,而Wiki實現了這種複雜度,還讓它能夠輕易地被完成,讓由眾多超文字鏈結所建構出來的複雜知識網路,也能夠被閱讀、編輯、增添。

相關文章:《劉韌談網路:WikiWiki快點快點》
相關網站連結:
http://en.wikipedia.org/
http://en.wiktionary.org/
編按:Wiki作者原譯名為"圍紀"。
Author: "Duncan"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 11:01
保護自己 線上申請著作授權
2004/11/01

創意公用授權條款把支配著作物的權利還諸創作者,不僅讓著作者讓真正支配著作權、享受利潤,也讓著作物的傳播、使用更有彈性、更合理。創意公用授權條款的授權內容不但簡明易懂,能被各種電腦程式採用,而且還於法有據,是自由、方便、並且真正合理的授權方式。
隨著人與人的交流越來越頻繁(這一方面得歸功於人口膨脹,另一方面則是由於通訊網路的日漸發達),今日世界中絕大多數的創作,皆是奠基於前人的作品。事實上,從學術界重視參考文獻的現象就可以看出,文明乃是經由不斷地累積及衍生著作而來。
許多創作者潛心創作,卻往往不闇世間險惡,她們單純地相信「版權」這兩個字能夠能夠保障她們的權益與收入,於是把畢生心血就這麼交給了老謀深算的出版商。豬頭皮(朱約信)曾經在受訪時表示,他就算想要翻唱自己創作的歌,都必須獲得唱片公司同意,或是等到作品出版十年以後才能再度翻唱。
許多國家的法律規定,當著作品完成的那一秒鐘起,該著作品就會受到著作權 (Copyright) 的「保護」。這意味著,所有相關的使用都必須先「請求許可」。然而多數人並沒有辦法獨立出版,所以得把著作權暫時或永久地讓渡給出版商。就算妳的至親好友想使用妳的作品內容,都沒辦法祇打個電話給妳就好,她硬是得去跟出版商的律師斡旋。拜著作權法之賜,出版商成為唯一得利的人。(好吧,頂多再加上專門接著作權案子的律師)
而事情還可以變得更複雜。舉例來說,妳拍了一張照片,想當作新書的封面。這張照片上是兩個人在一座畫廊裡,於是妳得先去徵詢這兩個人的同意,可能還得請她們簽署一些文件;接下來妳發現這兩個人身上的衣服、褲子、鞋子都是不同廠牌的,所以妳還得分頭去聯絡六家服飾廠商的法律部門,請她們授權給妳,讓妳能把她們所設計的產品,放進妳新書封面的照片裡。接下來是畫廊裡展示的畫,妳發現那些畫的作者已經去世了,然而那些畫的著作權卻已經渡讓給畫家的子嗣,所以妳又得去聯絡她們並取得授權;事情還沒結束,別忘了畫廊的裝潢陳設也是一種著作作品,所以妳當然得聯絡畫廊的負責人,再次取得使用授權。
而妳祇不過想把一張照片拿來當作新書封面罷了。
事情還可以更糟。妳有個朋友,剛好在寫一本新書,向讀者解說「書本封面設計實務」;她覺得妳的新書封面實在太棒了,於是前來向妳徵詢授權。很不幸地,妳新書封面那張照片裡,所有的素材對妳來說,都祇有獲得「商業使用」的授權,卻沒有獲得「衍生著作」的授權。所以妳的朋友還得找到剛剛那兩個人、六家服飾廠商、畫家子嗣以及畫廊負責人,然後再一次地想辦法取得授權。
別忘了,她要寫的是一本講解書本封面的書,而妳的新書封面祇是三百個範例的其中之一罷了。
如果妳真的很嚴謹地完成一樣著作,妳會發現自己得花 90% 的時間在跟來自世界各地的律師聯絡,簽署的授權合約搞不好比妳的作品內容還要多。
這些資訊、這些文化資產一次又一次地面臨使用自由的障礙。它們從出生(著作)、傳播、以至於使用,都沒有真正的自由;就好比妳有億萬存款,然而這些錢卻分文也不能動,那麼對妳來說其實就跟一無所有沒甚麼差別。同樣地,如果妳祇能保留自己作品的「一切權利」,卻沒辦法選擇性地釋出,那麼這種著作權對妳來說也就沒啥意義了。
事實上,真正的權利並非「保留」,而是「給予」。
妳也許會想授權給教育單位或非營利組織,讓她們不需特別跟妳聯絡,就能夠使用妳的作品;妳也許會想要授權給任何人使用的權利,祇要她註明這是妳的作品就行;甚至,妳不祇讓人們能夠自由使用妳的作品,還同意她們能夠以妳的作品為基礎,進行衍生創作。當妳做出這些決定時,不僅是真的在「使用權利」,更是在幫助人類文明的發展。因為要使用妳的作品的門檻變低了,所以妳的思想就更能傳遞到世界的其他角落去。
於是有人開始把自己的著作物捐獻到我們之前所提過的公領域 (Public Domain) 裏,讓自己的智慧結晶直接成為全世界的共有財產。然而有的人卻又覺得這樣過於極端、過於烏托邦,她們希望能夠在全有全無之間加以選擇,按照需求而給予讀者不同的權利。例如說,要求使用著作物時需提及原作者;又例如說,禁止商業使用等。這麼一來,著作者們不但能夠保障自己的權利,使自己免於受侵犯,同時又能讓自己的作品具有更多自由。
為了實現這個夢想,一個稱做「創意公共園地 (Creative Commons) 」的機構成立了。她們把幾種常用的授權項目整理出來,加以組合,成為「創意公用授權條款(Creative Commons Licenses) 」,然後把它們寫成嚴謹的法律條文,讓妳可以拿著這些條文上法院打官司(如果真的有必要的話),再把他們翻譯成凡夫俗子都能看懂的文字,所以妳或者妳的讀者們就能夠清楚地知道,哪些事情可以做而哪些不能;最後,她們還把這些條文再次翻譯成電腦資料,讓各種電腦程式也能看懂,而曉得哪些事情可以做、哪些不能。
為了要能讓這樣的授權方式履行世界各地,創意公共園地又開始了一個叫 iCommons 的國際化計畫,不僅祇是把這些文字內容翻譯成各國的語言,更由眾多法律專家的努力,讓這些授權條款的細則,得以用當地法律所認可的方式詮釋。換而言之,創意公用授權條款不祇讓妳重拾授予的權利,並且還保障妳在各國間穿梭無礙。
2003 年年底, Cory Doctorow 出版了他的第一本科幻小說《 Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom 》,這本書就以創意公用授權條款(以下簡稱 CC )授權,在網站上提供各種格式的全文,讓讀者們能夠免費下載。這本書獲選為美國娛樂週刊(Entertainment Weekly) 「 2003 年最佳小說」的第五名,在出版後的第一個月內就被下載了七萬五千次以上,同時在書店內的銷售狀況也好得不得了,在銷售排行榜上持續領先。於是今年年初, Cory Doctorow 的第二版科幻小說《 Eastern
Standard Tribe 》也使用 CC 授權出版。妳可以看到,一旦作者能夠選擇把部分的權利給予人們,其實反而是真正得利了。事實上,有一位 Koleman 針對這件事發表了一篇論文,證實了開放的作品比封閉的作品要更有獲利機會。
史丹佛大學法律系教授 Lawrence Lessig 前一本書《 Free Culture 》同樣地也使用了 CC ,結果網路上有人發起了「製作有聲書」的計畫,不到兩天的光景,集結世界各國的讀者,整本書的有聲書版就製作完成了。不僅如此,由於這本書採用CC 授權,所以中國大陸的 Issac 便發起了「 Free Culture 翻譯計畫」,要集結眾人之力,把這本書的內容翻譯成中文。 Lessig 日前於台灣 Creative Commons
計畫宣佈成立時受訪就表示,「創意共同園地的成立,並不是要抵抗現有的著作權法,它是依賴著作權法才得以存在。我們認為這可以為著作權之戰帶來和平,並且創造出雙贏的結果。」
麻省理工學院著名的 OpenCourseWare 計畫,要將所有的課程電子化並且開放給人們使用,所面臨最大的問題並非技術困難,而是接踵而來的法律問題;而她們所選擇的解決方案也正是 CC 。由於 CC 從一開始就同時著重一般讀者、法律、程式技術三個面向的實做,所以 CC 真正是讀者易瞭解、司法訴訟有保障、而且各種電腦程式都能運用的選擇;甚至有越來越多的搜尋引擎,能夠針對妳所需授權的不同,幫妳搜尋使用 CC 的著作物。
這些事,都不是從前的人們所能想見的,而妳我正逢此時代,實在是太幸運了。
如果讀者諸君也想在自己的創作採用 CC ,僅需連到台灣 CC 網站
http://creativecommons.org.tw/ ,就可以經由簡單的三個步驟,選擇妳想使用的授權條款,並且把這些授權聲明附加到各式各樣的著作物上。
有了 CC ,妳將能把更多的精力放在作品的內容,而感動更多人。有了 CC ,妳的作品將不祇是一份作品,而是全人類文化的基石,能結出更多璀璨的果實。
Author: "Duncan"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 29 Dec 2004 10:47
Linux:專利“私生子”?

王金元╱北京特稿
在微軟看來,Linux是一個地地道道的專利“私生子”。微軟對這一看法深信不疑,還不失時機地告誡大家,使用Linux會招來官司纏身。最近,微軟首席執行長史蒂夫.巴爾默在新加坡舉行的微軟亞洲政府領導人論壇上提醒亞洲國家,稱如果繼續採用Linux等開放原始碼作業系統,有可能會面臨智慧財產權方面的法律糾紛。
身世不明
巴爾默表示,Linux侵犯了至少228項專利。他說:“對於那些已經加入世界貿易組織的國家而言,使用Linux就意味著有一天會有人過來向你收取專利費。”巴爾默的警告無異於又給來歷不明的Linux刮來一陣陰風,使人不得不疑竇頓生:Linux是否真如巴爾默所言,侵犯了多項專利,是個地地道道的專利“私生子”?難道Linux的一些原始碼是私下裡進入開源社區的?
產生這種懷疑不無道理,畢竟,Linux從何而來一直沒有合法的出生證來證明。儘管Linux胸懷坦蕩,將自己所有的“遺傳基因”――原始碼通通公示於人,但由於其原始碼遍佈是由世界各地無數名志願者聯手編寫完成的,沒有人知道每一句代碼確切的出處,因此也就沒法說清自己的出身。
正因為Linux將自己的遺傳基因公之於眾,因此,人人都可以進行查看和驗證,以此想極力證明Linux的身世到底如何。於是,業界就有出現了一些有關Linux“驗明正身” 的調查結果。
今年8月,美國一家從事與開放原始碼智慧財產權相關的保險及諮詢公司Open Source Risk Management(OSRM)正式公佈了他們的調查結果,稱Linux總共侵犯了283項專利。其中,美國微軟擁有上述283項專利中的27項。
更讓人信以為真的是SCO已經對多家使用Linux的公司正式提起了訴訟,包括IBM等公司,這使得Linux用戶開始質疑:如果IBM方敗訴,那麼Linux用戶是否得為其Linux支付專利使用費?
不過,無論是調查結果還是法律起訴,目前都沒有得到法律的正式認可。甚至在鮑爾默發表此番評論後不久,微軟公司便出面解釋道,鮑爾默的發言並不意味著Linux作業系統真正侵犯了200多項專利權,他只是引用了那份報告而已。而現在看來,OSRM的結論和SCO的起訴也只是一面之詞,前者只是想多銷售一些有關Linux的保險,借機大發Linux身世不明的橫財以虛張聲勢,後者顯然是想獲得更多的許可費才要拼個魚死網破。
當然,雖然Linux還沒有正式判定是誰的“私生子”,但在得到法律的正式宣判之前,Linux仍舊面前身份可疑及由此引發出來的專利糾紛和專利費等諸多問題的挑戰。Linux 自己也承認,法律而非技術問題是開源運動現在面臨的最大挑戰。Linux創始人Linus Torvalds在年初Novell主辦的BrainShare用戶會議上說,非技術性問題,比如軟體專利糾紛是困擾開源作業系統的最大障礙。
面臨考驗
正是由於Linux的身世不明,從而讓它的對手抓住了弱點,並伺機加以報復和打擊。如果你通過市場競爭打不敗它們,何不用法律手段來起訴呢?而在這場較量中,微軟既是各種警告言論的發起者,又是各種抵毀報告的杜撰者,還是SCO案件的幕後指使者。微軟費盡心機,所做的這一切都是為了消除Linux的威脅。因為,CEO巴爾默坐上了Linux的熱椅,蓬勃發展的Linux讓他及其公司寢食難安了。
顯然,微軟的這一招夠狠。由於linux是自由軟體,即linux無需付費,也沒有版權。因此,linux挑戰的不僅來自微軟和SCO這樣的對手,還有現有的智慧財產權體系。而近一年來,歐盟、美國新的版權制度正在強化智慧財產權,對於智慧財產權的保護越來越嚴格。這對挑戰現有知識版權體制的Linux來說,顯然不是一件好事。
儼然,智慧財產權體系成了Linux的致命傷。對商家和用戶來說,這意味著要承擔著極大的風險。如果說某一天linux專利所有者宣佈這些用戶侵犯了版權時,他們就有被法律制裁的風險。
據報導,微軟正在做好起訴Linux的準備工作。最近,微軟正在大力築建其智慧財產權城牆,通過申請、交叉授權、收購與和解等方式來成為專利大戶,又通過加大對其智慧財產權的開放和保護力度來抗衡Linux和開源組織。等到時機成熟或被逼得走投無路時,微軟就會破釜沈舟,將Linux狀上法庭,以便來個一舉全勝。
正因為如此,明年11月猶他州對SCO案的判決被視為“Linux的生死之役”。Linux能否安全度過此次“生死之役”,它又如何突破其身世危機呢?
正身解圍
Linux自由戀愛、自由結婚生子,沒有結婚證,更沒有准生證,因此就難以弄明白它的身世。正因為難以說清自己的身世,Linux索性大白於天下,百分之百地公開自己的原始碼,讓社會來評判。此舉使Linux贏得了政府的支援、廠商的追捧和用戶的青睞,引發一場轟轟烈烈的軟體開源運動。
為了避免智慧財產權方面的風險,Linus Tomald 1991年發佈linux之後,建立了開放原始碼社區,社區裡的軟體愛好者共同遵守GPL原則:即每個社區成員可以共用社區的技術專利,但自己的技術也必須為社區所共有,專利擁有者必須承認其專利為社區共用。
由於大家承認專利為社區共有,遵守GPL協定的成員均可將這些技術提供給用戶,並且沒有被專利訴訟的風險。因此,GPL協定成為Linux興盛繁榮的源頭,因為只有這樣,用戶心安理得地使用Linux產品。
儘管如此,但難免還會有意或無意地引入一些他人不能共用的技術專利, Linux的專利糾紛也就難以避免。因此,Linux行業還得加以規範。據悉,在日前召開的“政府開放標準與自由軟體”大會上,歐洲委員會宣佈了它對開放標準的定義,要求任何可行的專利都要效忠於開放許可。IBM和Novell的代表對開放標準的新定義表示支援。
歐洲委員會的開放標準定義是歐洲協同框架最後版本1.0的一部分。內容包括:該標準的執行和維持由非贏得機構負責,標準的發展應遵照每個開放決定都得對所有相關部門可行的基準進行。該標準已經公佈,其詳細說明書允許所有人免費或象徵性收費對它進行拷貝、發行和使用。介入了該標準的智慧財產權如專利得忠於自由標準,不能撤消。重復使用該標準沒有限制。歐盟說明書強調開放原始碼與開放標準之間的緊密關係。更多資訊可查看大會網站。
與此同時,Linux廠商還得制定更加完善的智慧財產權政策。比如,紅帽早就預料到了競爭對手會發表這樣的言論,因此,紅帽在整個工程設計流程當中有一套三級體系確保任何與智慧財產權有關的問題都得到良好的解決。首先,專門審查來自開放原始碼開發的每一行代碼,審查代碼的來源,其許可證的情況,以及代碼到開源社區之前還去過什麼其他地方。接著,經過第一道人工檢查之後,紅帽會把每一行代碼都放到專業檢測工具當中,這些專業檢測工具會發現在任何一個代碼當中是不是這個代碼的實際來源和它在證書上說明的來源是不是吻合。最後一道環節是有-批技術專家和法律部的人員,他們花了大量的精力來研究在這方面已經獲得批准的所有專利。
此外,Linux廠商還得加大智慧財產權保護政策。比如,惠普、Novell和紅帽等都制定了相關的智慧財產權措施,紛紛申明如果出現專利糾紛,廠商將為用戶提供法律援助和所需費用,不需用戶勞神和破費,確保用戶不受Linux糾紛之累。這樣就打消Linux用戶在法律上的後顧之憂。也就是說,微軟一旦與Linux在法庭上見,那將是廠家的事情,與用戶無關。
未來命運
一邊是智慧財產權制度的捍衛者,一邊是智慧財產權制度的打破者。一邊的至高無上的法律撐腰,一邊有強大無比的社會力量支援。雙方的這種較量結局如何?顯然不能任憑現行智慧財產權法來加以處置,因為此法律是要保護智慧財產權,但更要保護廣大社會群體的利益。畢竟,法律是要為廣大民眾謀利益的,而不是要維護一些小群體的利益。
即便Linux真帶有某些利益小群體的“血統”,比如微軟的專利技術,微軟有權對Linux提起訴訟,但訴訟的結果肯定不會讓原告太滿意,頂多支付一些賠償,就像微軟自己當被告時一樣,不也最終賠付鉅資了事嗎?
同時,微軟還將面臨出示原始碼的風險。要想告倒對方,得拿出你的有力證據來。而有力證據當然就是微軟不願公開的核心原始碼。
至於Linux未來命運如何?歐盟將來出台的法律是關鍵。但專家認為,由於Linux與微軟的Windows作業系統截然不同,Linux的供應商又有幾十家,而且通常是免費提供的。更重要的,用戶可以根據自身需求對Linux作業系統進行定制和修改。因此,歐洲政府和企業會盡力遊說歐盟不要制定過於嚴厲的法律條款來對付Linux。即使有嚴格的法律最終被通過,可能會在一定程度上延遲Linux的普及,但絕對不會將Linux扼殺在搖籃中。
當社會普遍認可並接納了Linux時,Linux出身何處就不重要了。因為法律規定,私生的孩子也要承認其合法的公民身份。即便有人非得較勁,並查驗到它帶有“私生”血統,這也不是什麼大事。軟體霸主微軟不也時常在版權上吃下別人的官司嗎?何況Linux吃下這種官司不是獨自為了自己,而是為了全人類的解放,吃一點又何妨?因此,筆者奉勸微軟一句:最好收起告狀的心思,向藍色巨人IBM靠攏,早日融入到開源運動的行列之中為好。

【文稿來源:ChinaByte授權,武陵客代理】
Author: "Duncan"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 23 Dec 2004 21:23

Posted by Hello
Author: "Duncan"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 23 Dec 2004 13:25
三笑生最近剛看完一本書,名為「知識的戰爭」
其主要立論為智慧財產權已嚴重侵害傳統公共領域的範疇
例舉了在像是醫療、軟體、生技等領域實際發生的案例及爭議
所產生的效果,並不會造成科技的進步,反而嚴重影響後續的創新
作者最後提出的解決的建議是這些領域的專利要作部分的限制
專利的權力不延伸到公共領域去
與一般專利所言絕對性的排他權有所不同
值得深思
Author: "Duncan"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
» You can also retrieve older items : Read
» © All content and copyrights belong to their respective authors.«
» © FeedShow - Online RSS Feeds Reader