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Date: Friday, 09 Oct 2009 23:32

The final version of the Windows Web Services API for Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 is now available. This version corresponds to the final version of the WWSAPI released as part of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. To develop for this version of the runtime, you need to install Microsoft Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1. Please make sure to regenerate all code using the new version of wsutil.exe tool. You will also need to rebuild all source code that used any of the pre-released versions of this API.

This release is available in 25 languages: Arabic, Chinese - Hongkong, Chinese - Simplified, Chinese - Traditional, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian , Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish. The table below summarizes CPU architectures and the minimal level of Service Packs supported by this release. Make sure to deploy the latest service pack and all critical updates for the version of Windows to computers on which you plan to install this release. To find recent security updates, visit Windows Update.

 Windows Version

Service Pack

x86

x64

ia64

Windows XP

SP3

Yes

Yes

No

Windows Server 2003

SP2, R2 SP2

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows Vista

SP1

Yes

Yes

No

Windows Server 2008

SP1

Yes

Yes

Yes

In contrast to the past pre-released version of this API, this final version release can be used in production code and redistributed with the final versions of the product. Because of this, the final version is only available to companies who agree to terms of Windows Master Redistribution License Agreement (MRLA). To acquire the redistributable installers for this release and a copy of the Windows MRLA for review, please email a formal request to wwsredst@microsoft.com. In your email, please include a brief description of your plans for using this release and the business contact information for your company using which you can be reached at later on. If you have questions about this release, please email them to wwsredst@microsoft.com.

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WebServices"
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Date: Friday, 09 Oct 2009 23:32

The final version of the Windows Web Services API for Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 is now available. This version corresponds to the final version of the WWSAPI released as part of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. To develop for this version of the runtime, you need to install Microsoft Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1. Please make sure to regenerate all code using the new version of wsutil.exe tool. You will also need to rebuild all source code that used any of the pre-released versions of this API.

This release is available in 25 languages: Arabic, Chinese - Hongkong, Chinese - Simplified, Chinese - Traditional, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian , Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish. The table below summarizes CPU architectures and the minimal level of Service Packs supported by this release. Make sure to deploy the latest service pack and all critical updates for the version of Windows to computers on which you plan to install this release. To find recent security updates, visit Windows Update.

 Windows Version

Service Pack

x86

x64

ia64

Windows XP

SP3

Yes

Yes

No

Windows Server 2003

SP2, R2 SP2

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows Vista

SP1

Yes

Yes

No

Windows Server 2008

SP1

Yes

Yes

Yes

In contrast to the past pre-released version of this API, this final version release can be used in production code and redistributed with the final versions of the product. Because of this, the final version is only available to companies who agree to terms of Windows Master Redistribution License Agreement (MRLA). To acquire the redistributable installers for this release and a copy of the Windows MRLA for review, please email a formal request to wwsredst@microsoft.com. In your email, please include a brief description of your plans for using this release and the business contact information for your company using which you can be reached at later on. If you have questions about this release, please email them to wwsredst@microsoft.com.

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WebServices"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 09 Oct 2009 23:32

The final version of the Windows Web Services API for Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 is now available. This version corresponds to the final version of the WWSAPI released as part of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. To develop for this version of the runtime, you need to install Microsoft Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1. Please make sure to regenerate all code using the new version of wsutil.exe tool. You will also need to rebuild all source code that used any of the pre-released versions of this API.

This release is available in 25 languages: Arabic, Chinese - Hongkong, Chinese - Simplified, Chinese - Traditional, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian , Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish. The table below summarizes CPU architectures and the minimal level of Service Packs supported by this release. Make sure to deploy the latest service pack and all critical updates for the version of Windows to computers on which you plan to install this release. To find recent security updates, visit Windows Update.

 Windows Version

Service Pack

x86

x64

ia64

Windows XP

SP3

Yes

Yes

No

Windows Server 2003

SP2, R2 SP2

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows Vista

SP1

Yes

Yes

No

Windows Server 2008

SP1

Yes

Yes

Yes

In contrast to the past pre-released version of this API, this final version release can be used in production code and redistributed with the final versions of the product. Because of this, the final version is only available to companies who agree to terms of Windows Master Redistribution License Agreement (MRLA). To acquire the redistributable installers for this release and a copy of the Windows MRLA for review, please email a formal request to wwsredst@microsoft.com. In your email, please include a brief description of your plans for using this release and the business contact information for your company using which you can be reached at later on. If you have questions about this release, please email them to wwsredst@microsoft.com.

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WebServices"
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Date: Monday, 06 Jul 2009 23:33

For the super eagle eyed developer or Web Server admin, you might have noticed that cache entry validation happens slightly less frequently in IE8. I’m talking about the check to the Web Server (via If-Modified-Since) to see if the cached version of content needs updating or is still current. The short version of why this happens is the way that IE uses WinINet sessions changed to accommodate Loosely Coupled IE and session’s start time is an important factor in evaluating if WinINet needs to issue an If-Modified-Since request.

Digging deeper, we can look at a couple of the factors in the logic IE/WinINet is using to decide to issue an If-Modified-Since request. First is the the Cache Setting: “Check for newer versions of stored pages” in the “Temporary Internet Files and History Settings” as described in KB article 263070 and pictured with this blog entry. These are settings that apply to cached content missing the Expires headers. “Every time I visit the webpage” and “Never” are pretty straightforward. “Every time I start Internet Explorer” and “Automatically” have logic dependant on the the session’s start time. Another factor to note that we have different behavior when using the Back and Forward browser buttons compared to what we do in hyperlink navigation. The Back and Forward behavior also depends on the session’s start time when content is expired or is missing the Expires header.

How does Loosely Coupled IE in IE8 change the session start time? Previously any IE window got a single session in WinINet by the fact it only uses a single process and sharing of the session handle across tabs, with Loosely Coupled IE we had to do work to let multiple processes share session state. This means that new IE8 windows share the same session compared to new IE7 windows which get a new session. Eric Lawrence on the IEBlog talks a bit more about this session sharing behavior. The effect on WinINet is that IE8 sessions last longer on average then they used to and that means potentially less often revalidation of content from the Web Server.

-- Ari Pernick

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WinINet"
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Date: Monday, 06 Jul 2009 23:33

For the super eagle eyed developer or Web Server admin, you might have noticed that cache entry validation happens slightly less frequently in IE8. I’m talking about the check to the Web Server (via If-Modified-Since) to see if the cached version of content needs updating or is still current. The short version of why this happens is the way that IE uses WinINet sessions changed to accommodate Loosely Coupled IE and session’s start time is an important factor in evaluating if WinINet needs to issue an If-Modified-Since request.

Digging deeper, we can look at a couple of the factors in the logic IE/WinINet is using to decide to issue an If-Modified-Since request. First is the the Cache Setting: “Check for newer versions of stored pages” in the “Temporary Internet Files and History Settings” as described in KB article 263070 and pictured with this blog entry. These are settings that apply to cached content missing the Expires headers. “Every time I visit the webpage” and “Never” are pretty straightforward. “Every time I start Internet Explorer” and “Automatically” have logic dependant on the the session’s start time. Another factor to note that we have different behavior when using the Back and Forward browser buttons compared to what we do in hyperlink navigation. The Back and Forward behavior also depends on the session’s start time when content is expired or is missing the Expires header.

How does Loosely Coupled IE in IE8 change the session start time? Previously any IE window got a single session in WinINet by the fact it only uses a single process and sharing of the session handle across tabs, with Loosely Coupled IE we had to do work to let multiple processes share session state. This means that new IE8 windows share the same session compared to new IE7 windows which get a new session. Eric Lawrence on the IEBlog talks a bit more about this session sharing behavior. The effect on WinINet is that IE8 sessions last longer on average then they used to and that means potentially less often revalidation of content from the Web Server.

-- Ari Pernick

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WinINet"
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Date: Monday, 06 Jul 2009 20:33

For the super eagle eyed developer or Web Server admin, you might have noticed that cache entry validation happens slightly less frequently in IE8. I’m talking about the check to the Web Server (via If-Modified-Since) to see if the cached version of content needs updating or is still current. The short version of why this happens is the way that IE uses WinINet sessions changed to accommodate Loosely Coupled IE and session’s start time is an important factor in evaluating if WinINet needs to issue an If-Modified-Since request.

Digging deeper, we can look at a couple of the factors in the logic IE/WinINet is using to decide to issue an If-Modified-Since request. First is the the Cache Setting: “Check for newer versions of stored pages” in the “Temporary Internet Files and History Settings” as described in KB article 263070 and pictured with this blog entry. These are settings that apply to cached content missing the Expires headers. “Every time I visit the webpage” and “Never” are pretty straightforward. “Every time I start Internet Explorer” and “Automatically” have logic dependant on the the session’s start time. Another factor to note that we have different behavior when using the Back and Forward browser buttons compared to what we do in hyperlink navigation. The Back and Forward behavior also depends on the session’s start time when content is expired or is missing the Expires header.

How does Loosely Coupled IE in IE8 change the session start time? Previously any IE window got a single session in WinINet by the fact it only uses a single process and sharing of the session handle across tabs, with Loosely Coupled IE we had to do work to let multiple processes share session state. This means that new IE8 windows share the same session compared to new IE7 windows which get a new session. Eric Lawrence on the IEBlog talks a bit more about this session sharing behavior. The effect on WinINet is that IE8 sessions last longer on average then they used to and that means potentially less often revalidation of content from the Web Server.

-- Ari Pernick

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WinINet"
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Date: Friday, 08 May 2009 19:29

HTTP is a request/response protocol. You request some resource like the HTML of a webpage and the response comes back with the HTML attached.  As each request is sent on a connection, the complete response must be read from the connection before the next response can be read. (There is an optimization where you make more requests on a connection before receiving the full response to the previous requests known as pipelining. However it doesn’t change the need to receive all the data from the previous requests first.)

So if an application is asking for another request to a server while the current one is in progress, what’s a HTTP Client API to do? Well, it can either wait till the connection is available or start a new connection. This decision is mostly controlled by a configurable maximum number of simultaneous connections to a server.

With that in mind, how should the following customer question get answered?

My client application’s performance is getting impacted by WinInet opening new SSL connections to my server rather than reusing the existing connection. How do I fix this?

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WinINet, WinHttp"
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Date: Friday, 08 May 2009 19:29

HTTP is a request/response protocol. You request some resource like the HTML of a webpage and the response comes back with the HTML attached.  As each request is sent on a connection, the complete response must be read from the connection before the next response can be read. (There is an optimization where you make more requests on a connection before receiving the full response to the previous requests known as pipelining. However it doesn’t change the need to receive all the data from the previous requests first.)

So if an application is asking for another request to a server while the current one is in progress, what’s a HTTP Client API to do? Well, it can either wait till the connection is available or start a new connection. This decision is mostly controlled by a configurable maximum number of simultaneous connections to a server.

With that in mind, how should the following customer question get answered?

My client application’s performance is getting impacted by WinInet opening new SSL connections to my server rather than reusing the existing connection. How do I fix this?

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WinINet, WinHttp"
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Date: Friday, 08 May 2009 16:29

HTTP is a request/response protocol. You request some resource like the HTML of a webpage and the response comes back with the HTML attached.  As each request is sent on a connection, the complete response must be read from the connection before the next response can be read. (There is an optimization where you make more requests on a connection before receiving the full response to the previous requests known as pipelining. However it doesn’t change the need to receive all the data from the previous requests first.)

So if an application is asking for another request to a server while the current one is in progress, what’s a HTTP Client API to do? Well, it can either wait till the connection is available or start a new connection. This decision is mostly controlled by a configurable maximum number of simultaneous connections to a server.

With that in mind, how should the following customer question get answered?

My client application’s performance is getting impacted by WinInet opening new SSL connections to my server rather than reusing the existing connection. How do I fix this?

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WinINet, WinHttp"
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Date: Friday, 08 May 2009 02:47

In my last post, I announced the availability of QoS Traffic Generator on Microsoft Connect. In order to help you understand the usage of this tool, I have provided some examples of what it can do.

One of the most common tasks is to send traffic from one computer to another. The following example sends UDP traffic at 5 Mbps for 10 seconds.

Source

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -udp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 5000000 
-duration 10 Parsing command line... WSAStartup successful. Time between each packet (microsec): 2400 Size of each packet: 1472 Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000 Sending traffic at 5.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999 Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received (headers included), Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode 05/07/2009, 23:06:54, 421, 631500, 1014, 4982.249,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:55, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:56, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:57, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:58, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:59, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:00, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:01, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:02, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, Time has elapsed, or CTRL+C has been pressed. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Sink

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -sink -udp
Parsing command line...
Listening on all IP addresses.
WSAStartup successful.
Waiting for UDP traffic on port 9999, hit CTRL+C to exit...
WSARecvFrom completed.
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received (headers included), Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
05/07/2009, 23:06:54, 421, 631500, 1014, 4982.249,
05/07/2009, 23:06:55, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:06:56, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:06:57, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:06:58, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:06:59, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:07:00, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:07:01, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:07:02, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,

You can see the throughput in Kbps from the last column, along with other information such as timestamp and bytes received. The QoS Traffic Generator can also support multiple TCP connections from one sink. The next example shows two TCP flows, one using qWave and one using TC (used to throttle traffic) sending to the same destination.

Source 1

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -tcp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 1000000 -qwave
Parsing command line...
qWave traffic type: Best effort
qWave flow type: non-adaptive.
qWave LLTD option: system choice.
qWave flow fundamentals: do not display
WSAStartup successful.
qWave started up successfully.
Send interval: not used, packets will be sent as fast as possible
Packets to send per interval: 1
Size of each packet: 1000
Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000
Sending traffic at 1.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 129, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:06, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 127, 127000, 1015, 1000.985,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 127, 127000, 1014, 1001.972,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
ERROR: 64 in GetQueuedCompletionStatus: The specified network name is no longer 
available. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Source 2

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -tcp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 2000000 -tc 40,4
Parsing command line...
WSAStartup successful.
Send interval: not used, packets will be sent as fast as possible
Packets to send per interval: 1
Size of each packet: 1000
Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000
Sending traffic at 2.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode
05/07/2009, 23:01:59, 498, 498000, 1014, 3928.994,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:00, 248, 248000, 1014, 1956.607,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:01, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:02, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:03, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:13, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 250, 250000, 1014, 1972.387,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
ERROR: 64 in GetQueuedCompletionStatus: The specified network name is no longer 
available. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Sink

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -sink -tcp
Parsing command line...
Listening on all IP addresses.
WSAStartup successful.
Waiting for TCP traffic on port 9999, hit CTRL+C to exit...
AcceptEx has successfully completed.
Overlapped AcceptEx signaled.
Connection received: ::ffff:157.59.28.243:56677 --> ::ffff:192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
05/07/2009, 23:01:59, 498, 498000, 1014, 3928.994,
05/07/2009, 23:02:00, 248, 248000, 1014, 1956.607,
05/07/2009, 23:02:01, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:02, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
Overlapped AcceptEx signaled.
Connection received: ::ffff:157.59.28.243:56678 --> ::ffff:192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
AcceptEx has successfully completed.
05/07/2009, 23:02:03, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 129, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:06, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 127, 127000, 1015, 1000.985,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:13, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 250, 250000, 1014, 1972.387,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 127, 127000, 1014, 1001.972,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
Event set, thread exiting.
Receive thread exiting.
ReceiverThread exited successfully.
Control Event or Stop() called. TCP receive thread is exiting.
Main receive thread exited successfully.
WSACleanup successful.

The sink prints out statistics from both sources and was stopped using CTRL+C after about 20 seconds. Both traffic sources then exit gracefully. A full list of options is shown below.

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -?
Parsing command line...
Need to specify -source or -sink flag.

QoS Traffic Generator (Daytona), v. 1.0

Usage:

Sink: qostraffic -sink -tcp/-udp/-tcp_a 
[-dest destIP,destPort -local localIP,localPort] ... Source: qostraffic -source -tcp/-udp/-tcp_a -dest destIP,destPort
-throttle rate
[-local localIP,localPort -duration sec] ... Sink flags: -tcp/-udp Listens for TCP/UDP traffic default: listens on all addresses, port 9999 -tcp_a Connects to source and then begins receiving traffic Source must also specify -tcp_a flag Note: start the source first, then the sink -dest OPTIONAL Destination address to connect to for -tcp_a Ignored for -tcp/-udp cases -local OPTIONAL Listens on specific local address/port default port: 9999 Note: Can specify different port to listen on with,
localPort only. -qwave OPTIONAL Starts up qWave service. Used for adaptive flows from the source. -noconsole OPTIONAL Suppresses console output default is not suppressed Source flags: -tcp/-udp Listens for TCP/UDP traffic -tcp_a Accepts connection from sink then sends traffic Sink must also specify -tcp_a flag Note: start the source first, then the sink -dest Send traffic to destination address/port default port: 9999 Note: ignored for -tcp_a case -throttle Throttles traffic at specified rate (bits/sec) -pull OPTIONAL Operates the source in pull mode. Note: supported for TCP traffic only. -local OPTIONAL Send traffic from specified local address/port default port: 9999 Note: for -tcp_a case, this is the local address to
listen on -duration OPTIONAL Send traffic for specified time (sec) default: infinite -stats OPTIONAL Prints out statistics for specified time (msec) default: 1000 msec minimum: 200 msec -qwave OPTIONAL Uses qWave with the specified options (all optional) ,, trafficType: traffic type defined by QoS subsystem BE - best effort (default) BCK - background EE - excellent effort AV - audio/video VO - voice CTRL - control adaptive: force use adaptive flow default is nonadaptive lltd: force use LLTD packets default lets system choose LLTD or not flowfund: prints out QueryFlowFundamentals prints bandwidth estimations every 25 ms only supported when using adaptive flows EXAMPLE: -qwave AV,LLTD -server Optional, when used with qWave will prevent doing
QOSStartTracking/QOSStopTracking Note: conflicts with -tc flag. -tc OPTIONAL Uses TC with the specified options (all optional) ,<1p> dscp: DSCP value ranging from 0 to 63 default lets system choose 1p: 802.1p tag ranging from 0 to 7 default lets system choose Specifying -1 for either value is equivalent to
default. EXAMPLE: -tc 40,4 Note: conflicts with -qwave flag. Must be run as
admin. -packet OPTIONAL Performs packet experiments with given options (all
required) ,, size - size of each packet in bytes num - number of packets to send interval - time between each send in ms EXAMPLE: -packet 59,50,100 This will send a 59 byte packet every 100 ms, 50
times total. Note: packets can be tagged by using -tc options. -log OPTIONAL Logs to the specified file default filename: is "daytona_.txt" -noconsole OPTIONAL Suppresses console output default is not suppressed -localstats OPTIONAL Prints statistics from source default is sink side stats Note: conflicts with packet option, results will be
undefined -tolerance OPTIONAL Specify tolerance If no tolerance will assume 2%

Hopefully this post has been helpful in understanding what the QoS Traffic Generator can do. Please send us any comments you have!

  -- Jim Liu

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "QoS"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 08 May 2009 02:47

Update: This tool is no longer available on Microsoft Connect and there is no replacement download site.

 In my last post, I announced the availability of QoS Traffic Generator on Microsoft Connect. In order to help you understand the usage of this tool, I have provided some examples of what it can do.

One of the most common tasks is to send traffic from one computer to another. The following example sends UDP traffic at 5 Mbps for 10 seconds.

Source

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -udp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 5000000 
-duration 10 Parsing command line... WSAStartup successful. Time between each packet (microsec): 2400 Size of each packet: 1472 Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000 Sending traffic at 5.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999 Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received (headers included), Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode 05/07/2009, 23:06:54, 421, 631500, 1014, 4982.249,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:55, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:56, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:57, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:58, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:59, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:00, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:01, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:02, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, Time has elapsed, or CTRL+C has been pressed. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Sink

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -sink -udp
Parsing command line...
Listening on all IP addresses.
WSAStartup successful.
Waiting for UDP traffic on port 9999, hit CTRL+C to exit...
WSARecvFrom completed.
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received (headers included), Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
05/07/2009, 23:06:54, 421, 631500, 1014, 4982.249,
05/07/2009, 23:06:55, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:06:56, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:06:57, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:06:58, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:06:59, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:07:00, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:07:01, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:07:02, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,

You can see the throughput in Kbps from the last column, along with other information such as timestamp and bytes received. The QoS Traffic Generator can also support multiple TCP connections from one sink. The next example shows two TCP flows, one using qWave and one using TC (used to throttle traffic) sending to the same destination.

Source 1

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -tcp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 1000000 -qwave
Parsing command line...
qWave traffic type: Best effort
qWave flow type: non-adaptive.
qWave LLTD option: system choice.
qWave flow fundamentals: do not display
WSAStartup successful.
qWave started up successfully.
Send interval: not used, packets will be sent as fast as possible
Packets to send per interval: 1
Size of each packet: 1000
Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000
Sending traffic at 1.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 129, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:06, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 127, 127000, 1015, 1000.985,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 127, 127000, 1014, 1001.972,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
ERROR: 64 in GetQueuedCompletionStatus: The specified network name is no longer 
available. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Source 2

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -tcp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 2000000 -tc 40,4
Parsing command line...
WSAStartup successful.
Send interval: not used, packets will be sent as fast as possible
Packets to send per interval: 1
Size of each packet: 1000
Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000
Sending traffic at 2.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode
05/07/2009, 23:01:59, 498, 498000, 1014, 3928.994,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:00, 248, 248000, 1014, 1956.607,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:01, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:02, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:03, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:13, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 250, 250000, 1014, 1972.387,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
ERROR: 64 in GetQueuedCompletionStatus: The specified network name is no longer 
available. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Sink

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -sink -tcp
Parsing command line...
Listening on all IP addresses.
WSAStartup successful.
Waiting for TCP traffic on port 9999, hit CTRL+C to exit...
AcceptEx has successfully completed.
Overlapped AcceptEx signaled.
Connection received: ::ffff:157.59.28.243:56677 --> ::ffff:192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
05/07/2009, 23:01:59, 498, 498000, 1014, 3928.994,
05/07/2009, 23:02:00, 248, 248000, 1014, 1956.607,
05/07/2009, 23:02:01, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:02, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
Overlapped AcceptEx signaled.
Connection received: ::ffff:157.59.28.243:56678 --> ::ffff:192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
AcceptEx has successfully completed.
05/07/2009, 23:02:03, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 129, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:06, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 127, 127000, 1015, 1000.985,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:13, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 250, 250000, 1014, 1972.387,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 127, 127000, 1014, 1001.972,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
Event set, thread exiting.
Receive thread exiting.
ReceiverThread exited successfully.
Control Event or Stop() called. TCP receive thread is exiting.
Main receive thread exited successfully.
WSACleanup successful.

The sink prints out statistics from both sources and was stopped using CTRL+C after about 20 seconds. Both traffic sources then exit gracefully. A full list of options is shown below.

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -?
Parsing command line...
Need to specify -source or -sink flag.

QoS Traffic Generator (Daytona), v. 1.0

Usage:

Sink: qostraffic -sink -tcp/-udp/-tcp_a 
[-dest destIP,destPort -local localIP,localPort] ... Source: qostraffic -source -tcp/-udp/-tcp_a -dest destIP,destPort
-throttle rate
[-local localIP,localPort -duration sec] ... Sink flags: -tcp/-udp Listens for TCP/UDP traffic default: listens on all addresses, port 9999 -tcp_a Connects to source and then begins receiving traffic Source must also specify -tcp_a flag Note: start the source first, then the sink -dest OPTIONAL Destination address to connect to for -tcp_a Ignored for -tcp/-udp cases -local OPTIONAL Listens on specific local address/port default port: 9999 Note: Can specify different port to listen on with,
localPort only. -qwave OPTIONAL Starts up qWave service. Used for adaptive flows from the source. -noconsole OPTIONAL Suppresses console output default is not suppressed Source flags: -tcp/-udp Listens for TCP/UDP traffic -tcp_a Accepts connection from sink then sends traffic Sink must also specify -tcp_a flag Note: start the source first, then the sink -dest Send traffic to destination address/port default port: 9999 Note: ignored for -tcp_a case -throttle Throttles traffic at specified rate (bits/sec) -pull OPTIONAL Operates the source in pull mode. Note: supported for TCP traffic only. -local OPTIONAL Send traffic from specified local address/port default port: 9999 Note: for -tcp_a case, this is the local address to
listen on -duration OPTIONAL Send traffic for specified time (sec) default: infinite -stats OPTIONAL Prints out statistics for specified time (msec) default: 1000 msec minimum: 200 msec -qwave OPTIONAL Uses qWave with the specified options (all optional) ,, trafficType: traffic type defined by QoS subsystem BE - best effort (default) BCK - background EE - excellent effort AV - audio/video VO - voice CTRL - control adaptive: force use adaptive flow default is nonadaptive lltd: force use LLTD packets default lets system choose LLTD or not flowfund: prints out QueryFlowFundamentals prints bandwidth estimations every 25 ms only supported when using adaptive flows EXAMPLE: -qwave AV,LLTD -server Optional, when used with qWave will prevent doing
QOSStartTracking/QOSStopTracking Note: conflicts with -tc flag. -tc OPTIONAL Uses TC with the specified options (all optional) ,<1p> dscp: DSCP value ranging from 0 to 63 default lets system choose 1p: 802.1p tag ranging from 0 to 7 default lets system choose Specifying -1 for either value is equivalent to
default. EXAMPLE: -tc 40,4 Note: conflicts with -qwave flag. Must be run as
admin. -packet OPTIONAL Performs packet experiments with given options (all
required) ,, size - size of each packet in bytes num - number of packets to send interval - time between each send in ms EXAMPLE: -packet 59,50,100 This will send a 59 byte packet every 100 ms, 50
times total. Note: packets can be tagged by using -tc options. -log OPTIONAL Logs to the specified file default filename: is "daytona_.txt" -noconsole OPTIONAL Suppresses console output default is not suppressed -localstats OPTIONAL Prints statistics from source default is sink side stats Note: conflicts with packet option, results will be
undefined -tolerance OPTIONAL Specify tolerance If no tolerance will assume 2%

Hopefully this post has been helpful in understanding what the QoS Traffic Generator can do. Please send us any comments you have!

  -- Jim Liu

Author: "Ari B. Pernick" Tags: "QoS"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 07 May 2009 23:47

In my last post, I announced the availability of QoS Traffic Generator on Microsoft Connect. In order to help you understand the usage of this tool, I have provided some examples of what it can do.

One of the most common tasks is to send traffic from one computer to another. The following example sends UDP traffic at 5 Mbps for 10 seconds.

Source

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -udp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 5000000 
-duration 10 Parsing command line... WSAStartup successful. Time between each packet (microsec): 2400 Size of each packet: 1472 Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000 Sending traffic at 5.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999 Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received (headers included), Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode 05/07/2009, 23:06:54, 421, 631500, 1014, 4982.249,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:55, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:56, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:57, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:58, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:06:59, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:00, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:01, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,,,,,,, 05/07/2009, 23:07:02, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,,,,,,, Time has elapsed, or CTRL+C has been pressed. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Sink

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -sink -udp
Parsing command line...
Listening on all IP addresses.
WSAStartup successful.
Waiting for UDP traffic on port 9999, hit CTRL+C to exit...
WSARecvFrom completed.
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received (headers included), Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
05/07/2009, 23:06:54, 421, 631500, 1014, 4982.249,
05/07/2009, 23:06:55, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:06:56, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:06:57, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:06:58, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:06:59, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:07:00, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,
05/07/2009, 23:07:01, 422, 633000, 1014, 4994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:07:02, 423, 634500, 1014, 5005.917,

You can see the throughput in Kbps from the last column, along with other information such as timestamp and bytes received. The QoS Traffic Generator can also support multiple TCP connections from one sink. The next example shows two TCP flows, one using qWave and one using TC (used to throttle traffic) sending to the same destination.

Source 1

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -tcp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 1000000 -qwave
Parsing command line...
qWave traffic type: Best effort
qWave flow type: non-adaptive.
qWave LLTD option: system choice.
qWave flow fundamentals: do not display
WSAStartup successful.
qWave started up successfully.
Send interval: not used, packets will be sent as fast as possible
Packets to send per interval: 1
Size of each packet: 1000
Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000
Sending traffic at 1.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 129, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:06, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 127, 127000, 1015, 1000.985,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 127, 127000, 1014, 1001.972,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,,,,,,,
ERROR: 64 in GetQueuedCompletionStatus: The specified network name is no longer 
available. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Source 2

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -source -tcp -dest 192.168.1.100 -throttle 2000000 -tc 40,4
Parsing command line...
WSAStartup successful.
Send interval: not used, packets will be sent as fast as possible
Packets to send per interval: 1
Size of each packet: 1000
Statistics sampling interval (msec): 1000
Sending traffic at 2.00 Mbps to 192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Bottleneck BW, Available BW, RTT, BBSet, ABSet, RTTSet, ErrorCode
05/07/2009, 23:01:59, 498, 498000, 1014, 3928.994,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:00, 248, 248000, 1014, 1956.607,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:01, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:02, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:03, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:13, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 250, 250000, 1014, 1972.387,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,,,,,,,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,,,,,,,
ERROR: 64 in GetQueuedCompletionStatus: The specified network name is no longer 
available. SenderThread is exiting... SenderThread exited successfully. Stopping Source traffic, waiting 5 sec. SenderThread exited successfully. WSACleanup successful.

Sink

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -sink -tcp
Parsing command line...
Listening on all IP addresses.
WSAStartup successful.
Waiting for TCP traffic on port 9999, hit CTRL+C to exit...
AcceptEx has successfully completed.
Overlapped AcceptEx signaled.
Connection received: ::ffff:157.59.28.243:56677 --> ::ffff:192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
05/07/2009, 23:01:59, 498, 498000, 1014, 3928.994,
05/07/2009, 23:02:00, 248, 248000, 1014, 1956.607,
05/07/2009, 23:02:01, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:02, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
Overlapped AcceptEx signaled.
Connection received: ::ffff:157.59.28.243:56678 --> ::ffff:192.168.1.100:9999
Date, Time, Packets received, Bytes received, Elapsed time (msec), Throughput (Kbps), Message
AcceptEx has successfully completed.
05/07/2009, 23:02:03, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 129, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:04, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:05, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:06, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:07, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:08, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
05/07/2009, 23:02:09, 127, 127000, 1015, 1000.985,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:10, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:11, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:12, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:13, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:14, 250, 250000, 1014, 1972.387,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 126, 126000, 1014, 994.083,
05/07/2009, 23:02:15, 252, 252000, 1014, 1988.166,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 127, 127000, 1014, 1001.972,
05/07/2009, 23:02:16, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 125, 125000, 1014, 986.193,
05/07/2009, 23:02:17, 251, 251000, 1014, 1980.276,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 124, 124000, 1014, 978.304,
05/07/2009, 23:02:18, 247, 247000, 1014, 1948.718,
Event set, thread exiting.
Receive thread exiting.
ReceiverThread exited successfully.
Control Event or Stop() called. TCP receive thread is exiting.
Main receive thread exited successfully.
WSACleanup successful.

The sink prints out statistics from both sources and was stopped using CTRL+C after about 20 seconds. Both traffic sources then exit gracefully. A full list of options is shown below.

C:\qos>qostraffic.exe -?
Parsing command line...
Need to specify -source or -sink flag.

QoS Traffic Generator (Daytona), v. 1.0

Usage:

Sink: qostraffic -sink -tcp/-udp/-tcp_a 
[-dest destIP,destPort -local localIP,localPort] ... Source: qostraffic -source -tcp/-udp/-tcp_a -dest destIP,destPort
-throttle rate
[-local localIP,localPort -duration sec] ... Sink flags: -tcp/-udp Listens for TCP/UDP traffic default: listens on all addresses, port 9999 -tcp_a Connects to source and then begins receiving traffic Source must also specify -tcp_a flag Note: start the source first, then the sink -dest OPTIONAL Destination address to connect to for -tcp_a Ignored for -tcp/-udp cases -local OPTIONAL Listens on specific local address/port default port: 9999 Note: Can specify different port to listen on with,
localPort only. -qwave OPTIONAL Starts up qWave service. Used for adaptive flows from the source. -noconsole OPTIONAL Suppresses console output default is not suppressed Source flags: -tcp/-udp Listens for TCP/UDP traffic -tcp_a Accepts connection from sink then sends traffic Sink must also specify -tcp_a flag Note: start the source first, then the sink -dest Send traffic to destination address/port default port: 9999 Note: ignored for -tcp_a case -throttle Throttles traffic at specified rate (bits/sec) -pull OPTIONAL Operates the source in pull mode. Note: supported for TCP traffic only. -local OPTIONAL Send traffic from specified local address/port default port: 9999 Note: for -tcp_a case, this is the local address to
listen on -duration OPTIONAL Send traffic for specified time (sec) default: infinite -stats OPTIONAL Prints out statistics for specified time (msec) default: 1000 msec minimum: 200 msec -qwave OPTIONAL Uses qWave with the specified options (all optional) ,, trafficType: traffic type defined by QoS subsystem BE - best effort (default) BCK - background EE - excellent effort AV - audio/video VO - voice CTRL - control adaptive: force use adaptive flow default is nonadaptive lltd: force use LLTD packets default lets system choose LLTD or not flowfund: prints out QueryFlowFundamentals prints bandwidth estimations every 25 ms only supported when using adaptive flows EXAMPLE: -qwave AV,LLTD -server Optional, when used with qWave will prevent doing
QOSStartTracking/QOSStopTracking Note: conflicts with -tc flag. -tc OPTIONAL Uses TC with the specified options (all optional) ,<1p> dscp: DSCP value ranging from 0 to 63 default lets system choose 1p: 802.1p tag ranging from 0 to 7 default lets system choose Specifying -1 for either value is equivalent to
default. EXAMPLE: -tc 40,4 Note: conflicts with -qwave flag. Must be run as
admin. -packet OPTIONAL Performs packet experiments with given options (all
required) ,, size - size of each packet in bytes num - number of packets to send interval - time between each send in ms EXAMPLE: -packet 59,50,100 This will send a 59 byte packet every 100 ms, 50
times total. Note: packets can be tagged by using -tc options. -log OPTIONAL Logs to the specified file default filename: is "daytona_.txt" -noconsole OPTIONAL Suppresses console output default is not suppressed -localstats OPTIONAL Prints statistics from source default is sink side stats Note: conflicts with packet option, results will be
undefined -tolerance OPTIONAL Specify tolerance If no tolerance will assume 2%

Hopefully this post has been helpful in understanding what the QoS Traffic Generator can do. Please send us any comments you have!

  -- Jim Liu

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "QoS"
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Date: Wednesday, 06 May 2009 20:44

Just a quick note that over on on haoxu’ s “Lost in History” blog is a posting about how to create and register test SSL certs in http.sys for the Windows Web Services API Security Sample code. This might also be useful for developers using the http.sys apis.

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WebServices"
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Date: Wednesday, 06 May 2009 20:44

Just a quick note that over on on haoxu’ s “Lost in History” blog is a posting about how to create and register test SSL certs in http.sys for the Windows Web Services API Security Sample code. This might also be useful for developers using the http.sys apis.

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WebServices"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 06 May 2009 17:44

Just a quick note that over on on haoxu’ s “Lost in History” blog is a posting about how to create and register test SSL certs in http.sys for the Windows Web Services API Security Sample code. This might also be useful for developers using the http.sys apis.

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WebServices"
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Date: Friday, 01 May 2009 02:35

I’m posting on behalf of Jim Liu who is a SDET in Windows Core Networking. -- Ari

The QoS team is pleased to announce the availability of the QoS Traffic Generator on Microsoft Connect. This tool was developed during the Windows 7 development process and has been used extensively to aid in the testing of our QoS technologies. It is a command-line based tool that generates network traffic and utilizes TC/qWave to throttle and mark packets as desired. Some notable features include:

· Ability to send traffic at a specified throughput using Winsock from one machine to another

· Throttling is performed by the application itself or through QoS APIs (Traffic Control or qWave)

· Support TCP and UDP dual-mode sockets

· Provide traffic statistics from either the source machine or destination machine

· Can be built as a static library for use in other applications

We are providing this tool as a demonstration of QoS technologies and how they may be used to produce a novel application. Both 32 and 64-bit binaries are provided along with the source code and instructions for building the static library and the accompanying executable. The application itself has usage information on the available usage options.

To download the package, go to the WNDP site on Microsoft Connect and select Downloads from the left-hand menu. Select QoS Traffic Generator. Please send us any feedback you have about the tool!

  -- Jim Liu

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "QoS"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 01 May 2009 02:35

Update: This tool is no longer available on Microsoft Connect and there is no replacement download site.

I’m posting on behalf of Jim Liu who is a SDET in Windows Core Networking. -- Ari

The QoS team is pleased to announce the availability of the QoS Traffic Generator on Microsoft Connect. This tool was developed during the Windows 7 development process and has been used extensively to aid in the testing of our QoS technologies. It is a command-line based tool that generates network traffic and utilizes TC/qWave to throttle and mark packets as desired. Some notable features include:

· Ability to send traffic at a specified throughput using Winsock from one machine to another

· Throttling is performed by the application itself or through QoS APIs (Traffic Control or qWave)

· Support TCP and UDP dual-mode sockets

· Provide traffic statistics from either the source machine or destination machine

· Can be built as a static library for use in other applications

We are providing this tool as a demonstration of QoS technologies and how they may be used to produce a novel application. Both 32 and 64-bit binaries are provided along with the source code and instructions for building the static library and the accompanying executable. The application itself has usage information on the available usage options.

To download the package, go to the WNDP site on Microsoft Connect and select Downloads from the left-hand menu. Select QoS Traffic Generator. Please send us any feedback you have about the tool!

  -- Jim Liu

Author: "Ari B. Pernick" Tags: "QoS"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 30 Apr 2009 23:35

I’m posting on behalf of Jim Liu who is a SDET in Windows Core Networking. -- Ari

The QoS team is pleased to announce the availability of the QoS Traffic Generator on Microsoft Connect. This tool was developed during the Windows 7 development process and has been used extensively to aid in the testing of our QoS technologies. It is a command-line based tool that generates network traffic and utilizes TC/qWave to throttle and mark packets as desired. Some notable features include:

· Ability to send traffic at a specified throughput using Winsock from one machine to another

· Throttling is performed by the application itself or through QoS APIs (Traffic Control or qWave)

· Support TCP and UDP dual-mode sockets

· Provide traffic statistics from either the source machine or destination machine

· Can be built as a static library for use in other applications

We are providing this tool as a demonstration of QoS technologies and how they may be used to produce a novel application. Both 32 and 64-bit binaries are provided along with the source code and instructions for building the static library and the accompanying executable. The application itself has usage information on the available usage options.

To download the package, go to the WNDP site on Microsoft Connect and select Downloads from the left-hand menu. Select QoS Traffic Generator. Please send us any feedback you have about the tool!

  -- Jim Liu

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "QoS"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 24 Feb 2009 20:40

Windows Web Services API team has just release the Beta version of the API for Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008. It is available now on the Connect site for Windows Networking. This release contains the same version of the runtime as in Windows 7 Beta. You may find the table that summarizes level of Service Packs and CPU architectures supported by this release and direct links to download pages in this announcement. Please try it out and report any installation and runtime issues by submitting the feedback using the WNDP Connect site. The reference documentation for the API is available from MSDN. Please use this forum to ask WWSAPI team questions about the API and just released installers.

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WebServices"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 24 Feb 2009 20:40

Windows Web Services API team has just release the Beta version of the API for Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008. It is available now on the Connect site for Windows Networking. This release contains the same version of the runtime as in Windows 7 Beta. You may find the table that summarizes level of Service Packs and CPU architectures supported by this release and direct links to download pages in this announcement. Please try it out and report any installation and runtime issues by submitting the feedback using the WNDP Connect site. The reference documentation for the API is available from MSDN. Please use this forum to ask WWSAPI team questions about the API and just released installers.

Author: "AriPernick" Tags: "WebServices"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
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