• Shortcuts : 'n' next unread feed - 'p' previous unread feed • Styles : 1 2

» Publishers, Monetize your RSS feeds with FeedShow:  More infos  (Show/Hide Ads)


Date: Saturday, 20 Sep 2014 11:59

The weekend is a great time to catch up on some posts that were either too long or simply didn’t fit in during the week. Hope you enjoy!

Investing

Three mistakes investors keep making again and again.  (Morgan Housel)

Why even risk-averse investors should have some money in stocks.  (Alliance Bernstein)

In praise of satisficing when it comes to money management.  (Stumbling and Mumbling)

Personal finance

Thinking about retirement as a luxury good.  (Aleph Blog)

Middle class investors don’t need a robo-advisor they need a “financial coach.”  (WSJ)

Is there ever a case to be made for equity-indexed annuities?  (Larry Swedroe)

Gen Z needs to get to investing.  (Andy Swan)

Finance

Finance 101: buybacks, dividends, Modigliani and Miller.  (FT Alphaville)

Why institutional investors need to take greater control of their portfolios.  (Institutional Investor)

Eight lessons from launching a new wealth management practice.  (The Reformed Broker)

What good is impact investing?  (Justin Fox)

Venture capital

Bill Gurley on where there are signs of froth in the startup world.  (WSJ)

Why VCs need to play offense and get away from their e-mails.  (Both Sides of the Table)

Venture capital is a terrible investment but good for the country.  (Vox)

Five angel investors spill their secrets.  (Quartz)

The problem with convertible notes.  (Both Sides of the Table)

Why aren’t VCs looking outside of Silicon Valley for startups?  (TechCrunch)

Y Combinator is now going to become a Stanford class on startups.  (Recode)

Technology

A profile of Matt Mullenweg and the WordPress ecosystem which is “a bizarre blend of non- and for-profit.”  (Fast Company)

An interview with Tim Cook, CEO of Apple ($AAPL).  (Businessweek)

How watches are different than other technology.  (Benedict Evans)

Robots have worked their way into smaller factories.  (WSJ)

Health

Stand up to live longer.  (Well)

Are we overdiagnosing cancer?  (WSJ)

Flu shots as a loss-leader.  (Time)

Food

Americans are tired of long restaurant menus.  (Wonkblog)

Yum Brands ($YUM) is testing a new Vietnamese concept Bahn Shop.  (Businessweek, ibid)

Why America refrigerates its eggs and the rest of the world doesn’t.  (NPR)

Breaking down the cost of a six pack of craft beer.  (Huffington Post)

Sports

The state of the union that is the Chicago Cubs.  (NYTimes)

MLB looks like a failure only relation to the NFL.  (The Big Lead)

Autos

Your car is grossly underutilized.  (Quartz)

Sounds like everybody was excited by the debut of Formula E.  (The Verge)

Football

Why you shouldn’t let your kids play football.  (Time)

Why it is so hard to be a football fan: insights from Steve Almond’s Against Football: One Fan’s Reluctant Manifesto.  (Newsweek)

Big media is highly dependent on the success of the NFL.  (WSJ)

Entertainment

On the revival of long form content on the web.  (Newsweek)

A comprehensive look at the fall TV schedule.  (Vox)

Time slots still matter for new TV shows.  (Quartz)

On the death of the fadeout in popular music.  (Slate)

Books

David R. Bell author of Location is Everything on why where we live still greatly affects how we shop.  (Wonkblog)

Lessons from Chris Guillebeau in his brand new book, The Happiness of Pursuit.  (Tim Maurer)

Tales from The Princess Bride. A Q&A with Carey Elwes author of As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride.  (The Daily Beast)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

What you might have missed in our Friday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

Tracking down the real story behind Prof. Dr. Anthony Nobles.  (SIRF)

Can Robert Gates turn the Boy Scouts around?  (Esquire)

A dozen things learned from Yuri Milner.  (25iq)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Saturday links:  financial coaches

The post Saturday links: financial coaches appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 19 Sep 2014 16:10

Quote of the day

“Investors wrongly assume that outstanding investment managers are skilled in all areas.”  (AlphaBetaWorks)

Chart of the day

SCHW 0914 624x375 Friday links:  flexible asset allocations

Charles Schwab ($SCHW) is leading other broker-dealers higher.  (StockCharts Blog)

Gold

Three years the price of gold peaked.  (The Reformed Broker)

Why is the price of gold falling?  (Pragmatic Capitalsm, Crossing Wall Street)

Strategy

Some enduring lessons from the financial crisis.  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

The challenging psychology of stop loss levels.  (TraderFeed)

Research

Putting the “Flexible Asset Allocation” framework through its paces.  (Alpha Architect)

Is there a large cap value premium?  (Larry Swedroe)

What does a “death cross” mean for the Russell 2000?  (Adam Grimes)

CEOs reallocate news into vesting months.  (SSRN)

Companies

How Tesla ($TSLA) and SolarCity ($SCTY) plan to work together to make solar power ubiquitous.  (WSJ)

What Yahoo ($YHOO) and Twitter ($TWTR) should do with their cash.  (Quartz, Motley Fool)

Finance

Let the “leaving money on the table” talk begin. Alibaba ($BABA) pops on its debut.  (Dealbook)

A discussion with Brad Katsuyama of IEX Group.  (All About Alpha)

Banks are tired of giving business away to the likes of Lending Club.  (WSJ)

Bank loans are NOT securities.  (Bloomberg)

Has the Bitcoin bubble popped?  (FT Alphaville)

Bill Gates

Meet the man who managed Bill Gates’ money.  (WSJ)

Lessons from Bill Gates’ portfolio.  (Total Return Investor)

Commodities

Why crude oil is once again going into storage.  (WSJ)

Why commodities are so hard to index.  (ETF)

ETFs

Charles Schwab is increasing the number of commission-free funds in its ETF marketplace.  (ETF Trends)

The ETF Deathwatch for August 2014.  (Invest with an Edge)

Global

Scotland rejects independence.  (NYTimes)

Economy

The Scottish independence vote once again showed the utility of prediction markets.  (The Upshot)

The elimination of the routine use of antibiotics in animals is a big deal.  (Marginal Revolution)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

Podcast Friday: pitching a billionaire.  (Abnormal Returns)

What you might have missed in our Thursday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

Which iPhone 6 should you buy?  (Quartz)

You’re crazy if you think consumers want another expensive, proprietary music format.  (Marco Ament)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Friday links:  flexible asset allocations

The post Friday links: flexible asset allocations appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 19 Sep 2014 13:50

Every week brings a slew of new podcasts and videos. We are planning to make this a regular feature. You can also check out last week’s links. Tell us if there is anything we missed. Enjoy!

Barry Ritholtz talks with Laszlo Birinyi.  (Big Picture)

How to win the loser’s game (part 4).  (Sensible Investing)

Howard Lindzon and Michael Parekh talk about the startup bubble and investor’s desire for permanent capital.  (Soundcloud)

Tim Ferriss talks with Brendan Moynihan co-author of What I Learned Losing A Million Dollars.  (Tim Ferriss Show)

How not to pitch a billionaire. From the new podcast series from Alex Blumberg of Planet Money fame.  (StartUp Podcast)

James Altucher talks with Peter Thiel about his new book Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future.  (The James Altucher Show)

A discussion about the future of media with three editors of old school media properties.  (a16z podcast)

Apple CEO Tim Cook talks with Charlie Rose.  (Charlie Rose Show)

A great live performance by Broken Bells on KEXP.  (YouTube)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Podcast Friday: pitching a billionaire

The post Podcast Friday: pitching a billionaire appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "Multimedia"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 18 Sep 2014 14:56

Quote of the day

Thomas C. Redman, “Good algorithms make better predictions than people most of the time – except when they don’t.”  (HBR)

Markets

Why has option selling been such a successful strategy the past 25 years?  (Adam Warner)

Comparing the quality ETFs.  (ETF)

Why traders go on tilt?  (TraderFeed)

Finance

Banks should benefit from higher rates.  (Scott Krisiloff)

Beware companies piling on debt.  (James O’Shaughnessy)

The pros and cons of the Alibaba ($BABA) IPO.  (Aaron Task, WSJ)

What will Calpers do with private equity?  (Fortune)

Why Bitcoin could win big in Las Vegas.  (Fast Company via @mediaredef)

Apple Watch

Do the price differences for the various Apple Watches matter?  (Daring Fireball)

What I got wrong about the Apple Watch.  (stratechery)

Economy

Weekly initial unemployment claims dipped last week.  (Calculated Risk)

Still no signs of inflation.  (Pragmatic Capitalism, Dr. Ed’s Blog)

Homebuilder sentiment is strong but housing starts not so much.  (Real Time Economics)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

What you might have missed in our Wednesday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Reading

Amazon’s Kindle Voyage is the “Rolls Royce of e-readers.”  (Engadget)

Why “deep reading” is so difficult these days.  (New Yorker)

Mixed media

Five years in a review of Shark Tank.  (Grantland also John Greathouse)

It just got a lot easier to share your media amongst family and friends.  (Recode)

Ten commandments for dealing with Finance Twitter.  (Stone Street Advisors)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Thursday links:  good algorithms

The post Thursday links: good algorithms appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 17 Sep 2014 16:54

You can keep up with all of our posts by signing up for our daily e-mail. Thousands of other readers already have. Don’t miss out!

Quote of the day

Morgan Housel, “One reason finance is a breeding ground for disagreement is because everyone gets their own version of history based on their own unique life experiences.”  (Motley Fool)

Chart of the day

Nasdaq 0914 596x420 Wednesday links:  unique life experiences

Nearly half of the Nasdaq stocks are in a “bear market.”  (Dana Lyons)

Markets

Breadth by market cap. (Bespoke)

How is the Global Market Index doing?  (Capital Spectator)

The buyback boom is slowing.  (Pragmatic Capitalism)

CTAs had a good month.  (Focus on Funds, Au.Tra.Sy Blog)

Bears

Why the media loves calls for a market crash.  (Above the Market)

Is CNBC now turning on its bearish commentators?  (Business Insider)

Strategy

Why you should be cultivating your strengths to aid your trading.  (TraderFeed)

On the relationship between post-earnings announcement drift and 52-week highs.  (Alpha Architect)

Companies

The biggest worry about Alibaba ($BABA) seems to be governance.  (Musings on Markets, FT Alphaville, Dealbook)

Boeing ($BA) and SpaceX win contracts to shuttle astronauts to the ISS.  (WashingtonPost, WSJ)

How Warren Buffett’s acquisition of Benjamin Moore went off-track.  (Fortune)

Nelson Peltz wants to break up DuPont ($DD).  (WSJ, Dealbook, MoneyBeat)

Peter Thiel

Eight things learned from Peter Thiel’s Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future.  (Farnam Street)

Thiel needs a lesson on macroeconomics.  (Pragmatic Capitalism)

Peter Thiel on diversification.  (Reading the Markets)

Discussing the lessons from Peter Thiel’s Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future.  (a16z podcast)

Funds

Who should get top billing: the index or the ETF manager?  (FT)

Why fund fees matter.  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

Benchmarks have a disproportionate effect on emerging markets.  (FT)

Economy

Inflation just can’t seem to find any traction.  (Calculated Risk)

The Business Cycle Index points towards steady growth.  (Big Picture)

You can’t feed a family with GDP.  (The Upshot)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

Hedge fund picking is hard.  (Abnormal Returns)

What you might have missed in our Tuesday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Apple

The reviews for the iPhone 6 are rolling and are uniformly positive.  (Recode, Yahoo, NYTimes, WSJ, BW)

The iPhone 6 Plus is a very different animal.  (Daring Fireball, TechCrunch)

Don’t forget that iOS 8 is coming as well.  (WSJ, The Switch, Quartz)

How the iPhone 6 could change weather forecasting.  (Slate)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Wednesday links:  unique life experiences

The post Wednesday links: unique life experiences appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 17 Sep 2014 16:23

Yesterday we reviewed some of the commentary on Calpers decision to opt of hedge funds. The feedback continues to come in so we decided to break out this discussion into a standalone post. The consensus seems to be that picking hedge funds is a difficult task for anyone, including big managers like Calpers, the costs of hedge funds are simply too high and that individual investors are really not missing out on all that much by being locked out of hedge funds. Enjoy.

“Picking the winning hedge fund managers is hard.”  (Alpha Attribution)

The scuttlebutt was that Calpers was bad at picking hedge funds.  (Business Insider)

Why Calpers kicked hedge funds to the curb: negative alpha.  (Alpha Architect also Bloomberg)

Who benefits from the end of hedge funds at Calpers?  (WSJ, MoneyBeat)

Calpers isn’t really going to miss their hedge fund allocation.  (Matt Levine)

Why do institutional investors bother with hedge funds?  (FT, ibid)

Why Harvard should emulate Calpers, not Yale.  (Barry Ritholtz)

Hedge funds never were an “asset class.”  (Brian Portnoy)

Cliff Asness, “We believe there are many strategies pursued by hedge funds and active managers in general that don’t rely on very obscure skills, and therefore that should not earn them two and twenty.”  (AQR)

Breaking down the costs of hedge funds.  (FT Alphaville)

Individual investors should thank their lucky stars they can’t invest in hedge funds.  (Mark Hulbert)

Investors aren’t missing much by avoiding alternatives.  (Aleph Blog)

What lesson should individual investors take from Calpers’ decision?  (Dan Solin)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Hedge fund picking is hard

The post Hedge fund picking is hard appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "Hedge Funds"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 16:54

Quote of the day

Jesse Felder, “Investment advice like this should be compensated just like all the other “advice” given by professionals out there – attorneys, accountants, therapists, etc. – on an hourly rate.”  (The Felder Report)

Chart of the day

BNO 0914 560x420 Tuesday links:  other advice givers

Brent oil price weakness is notable.  (FT Alphaville)

Markets

Small caps continue to lag.  (Crossing Wall Street, ibid)

Where did all the “deep value” stocks go?  (Millennial Invest)

Just how much is the big buyback wave driving stocks higher?  (WSJ, The Reformed Broker)

Why you should think twice (or three times) about buying Alibaba ($BABA).  (Jason Zweig)

Strategy

Why relying on past market returns is a big mistake. (Pragmatic Capitalism)

Many managers have a “not in invented here” problem.  (BeyondProxy)

Investors often willfully ignore the facts.  (Bucks Blog)

Trading

How to cultivate trading intuition.  (TraderFeed)

It’s not enough to find “excellent reward/risk ratio trades.” (Adam Grimes)

Companies

Eddie Lampert is loaning money to Sears Holdings ($SHLD).  (Fortune, Bloomberg)

Would regulators really let AB InBev ($BUD) and SABMiller combine?  (Wonkblog)

California

Calpers is shutting down its hedge fund investing.  (Bloomberg, Barry Ritholtz, Pragmatic Capitalism, FT Alphaville, Dealbook)

The Univ. of California is launching a fund to invest in university-related startups.  (WSJ)

Finance

A theory on why defined benefit plans went away.  (WSJ)

Who wants to be in charge of Harvard’s endowment fund?  (Dealbook)

The big flaw in share buybacks.  (Economist)

ETFs

Thinking about bank loan funds as illiquid junk bond funds.  (Newfound Research)

Economy

The outcome of the FOMC meeting is genuinely in doubt.  (Gavyn Davies)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

Is this the beginning of the end of the hedge fund gravy train?  (Abnormal Returns)

What you might have missed in our Monday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

Valuations can be fixed, but burning cash is irreversible.  (A VC)

Why embracing failure is tougher than it looks for companies.  (FT)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Tuesday links:  other advice givers

The post Tuesday links: other advice givers appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 16:25

Much is being made this morning about the news that the country’s largest pension fund, Calpers, is eliminating their investments in hedge funds and hedge fund of funds. Calpers was diplomatic in its announcement (via WSJ):

“Hedge funds are certainly a viable strategy for some,” said Ted Eliopoulos, interim chief investment officer at Calpers, in a statement. For Calpers, the program “doesn’t merit a continued role” due to how complex and costly the funds can be, he said.

This change, $4 billion of nearly $300 billion in assets, is for the fund a small one but is being taken by many as a sea change for the hedge fund industry. Make no mistake hedge funds are now in fact an industry. Barclay Hedge shows hedge funds managing some $2.8 trillion in assets as of Q2 2014. These funds generate huge fees for their managers and for the firms that support them. It is not for nothing the highest paid hedge fund managers often earn in the billions per annum.

The question is whether Calpers is the beginning of the end of the institutional asset gravy train for hedge funds or just a blip along the way?

Barry Ritholtz at Bloomberg View has been writing about the shortcomings of hedge funds thinks this could be start of a bigger trend:

What does this do to the belief that hedge funds delivery higher returns than equities? This expectation, of course, has proven to be a myth. But state treasurers bought into this fiction because it allowed them to make much smaller contributions to employee-retirement accounts, keeping local tax rates down. This short-term patch is setting up much bigger shortfalls in the future.

Cullen Roche at Pragmatic Capitalism thinks that this move is another blow to high fee structures all over investment management:

More interestingly, this is another big blow to high fee fund managers.  The days of being able to charge 2 & 20 are dying out.  My general guidance on any form of active management is to avoid any fund with a fee structure over 0.5%.  I make an exception on rare occasion for higher fee funds, but that’s a pretty good rule of thumb in most cases.  And that’s on the high side….

Dan McCrum at FT Alphaville notes both the cost and complexity argument. However he makes another point that is applicable to large funds like Calpers. His point is that building a sizable hedge fund portfolio that is able to outperform without undue risk (and correlation) is difficult at best:

What is difficult to the point of impossible when most hedge funds fail (the average life of a fund is just five years) is selecting a collection of hedge funds that deliver on the sales pitch… that are also suitable for pension funds to invest in. Young and very small hedge funds may offer good investment returns, but a pension fund can’t spot them in time, or invest in a size which makes it worthwhile.

Even before this announcement the hedge fund fee structure was coming under attack. Klaus Wille at Bloomberg notes how high standard fees sap performance in a low nominal return world.

The fees, which still make up as much as 2 percent of a fund’s assets, represent a disproportionately high share of the total remuneration unrelated to performance, said Nicolas Rousselet, head of hedge funds at Unigestion. To align managers’ pay more with performance, the fund industry should either abandon the management fee or combine it with a hurdle rate that one must achieve before collecting incentive fees, he said.

One could argue that pension funds, as opposed to endowment funds, are a poor home for hedge funds. Either way there are a shrinking number of people willing to defend hedge funds. That being said hedge funds aren’t going away any time soon. As long as there is a desire on the part of investors to outperform the market there will be a ready source of asset for hedge fund managers. It may simply be the case that the biggest hedge funds continue to get bigger.

 

www.FeedBurner.com) The beginning of the end of the hedge fund gravy train

The post The beginning of the end of the hedge fund gravy train appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "Hedge Funds"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 16:55

Quote of the day

Ben Thompson, “I think it [Minecraft] has the potential to continue to grow and, along the way, not only make Microsoft a whole bunch of money, but also enable an entire ecosystem. It really could be the Office of gaming.”  (stratchery)

Chart of the day

AMZN 0914 624x390 Monday links:  Office of gaming

Is Alibaba drawing attention from Amazon ($AMZN)?  (Quartz)

Markets

Market bears are capitulating.  (WSJ)

Should we be concerned about the surge in IPOs like Alibaba?  (Lex)

Has the market already incorporated all the positive economic surprises?  (Humble Student)

Strategy

How often do stocks and bonds fall together?  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

Why some anomalies seem to persist.  (Larry Swedroe)

On the dangers of chasing style performance.  (Rick Ferri)

Quant stuff

How to use bootstrapping techniques when you are lacking returns data.  (Capital Spectator)

In defense of a quantitative approach to the market.  (Math Trading via TraderFeed)

On the advantages of mechanical strategies.  (Systems Trader via Whole Street)

Wearables

Apple ($AAPL) is now a lifestyle company not a computer technology company.  (Om Malik)

What is the “why” of the Apple Watch?  (stratchery)

Don’t underestimate the potential of smartwatches and other wearables.  (Chris Mims)

How companies could incorporate wearables.  (TechCrunch)

Companies

Yahoo’s ($YHOO) time as an Alibaba ($BABA) proxy are almost over.  (MicroFundy)

The Microsoft ($MSFT) deal for Minecraft is official.  (Dealbook)

Where American companies are winning.  (Howard Lindzon)

Finance

Bill Ackman is set to raise some $2 billion in permanent capital.  (Dealbook, FT)

Global

Why everyone is nervous about slowing Chinese economic growth.  (Sober Look also Quartz)

Non-US real estate generally has a lower correlation that domestic REITs.  (Alliance Bernstein)

Economy

Why the Fed has plenty of time to turn the switch.  (FT Alphaville)

A preview of this week’s FOMC meeting.  (Calculated Risk)

Industrial production in August actually dropped.  (GEI, Calculated Risk)

The fracking boom is bigger than anyone thought possible.  (WSJ)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

102 finance people you have to follow on Twitter.  (Business Insider)

What you might have missed in our Sunday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

Here’s how to cancel a meeting the right way.  (Mark Suster)

The twilight of the big management consulting firms.  (FT)

The case against “on demand for everything.”  (Recode)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Monday links:  Office of gaming

The post Monday links: Office of gaming appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Sunday, 14 Sep 2014 11:37

Quote of the day

Morgan Housel, “Shallow risk should be looked at as little more than an annoyance. Almost everything the media calls a perfect storm is really just standard shallow risk.”  (Motley Fool)

Chart of the day

 Sunday links:  standard shallow risks

Microsoft ($MSFT) stock is up some $20 since Steve Ballmer announced his retirement.  (Syncubate)

Strategy

A fireside chart with Charlie Munger.  (MoneyBeat)

Why market dips have been so shallow of late.  (A Dash of Insight)

How to scale your equity exposure.  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

Why managed futures aren’t getting the job done.  (InvestmentNews)

Trading

Three reasons why traders fail to follow through on their trading plans.  (TraderFeed)

How to recognize if your trading is “on tilt.”  (See It Market)

21 crowdsourced trading rules.  (StockCharts Blog)

Companies

Why is Microsoft ($MSFT) paying $2.5 billion for the maker of Minecraft?  (Recode)

You really need to read the Starboard Value presentation on the mess that is Olive Garden.  (Business Insider)

(B)uy-backs have a flaw: they can create perverse incentives to pay out too much cash, damaging firms’ balance-sheets and their ability to invest.”  (Economist)

Economy

A look back at the economic week that was.  (Bonddad Blog, Big Picture)

The economic schedule for the coming week.  (Calculated Risk)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

Top clicks this week on the site.  (Abnormal Returns)

What you might have missed in our Saturday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

Despite the high costs Germany has embraced the transition to renewable energy.  (NYTimes)

Cities are recognizing the value of their riverfronts.  (New Geography)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Sunday links:  standard shallow risks

The post Sunday links: standard shallow risks appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Sunday, 14 Sep 2014 10:36

Thanks for checking in with us this weekend. Here are the most clicked on items on Abnormal Returns for the week ended Saturday, September 13th, 2014. The description is as it reads in the relevant linkfest:

  1. Jason Zweig, “So try to socialize—in the real world and in online social media—only with investors who are calm and methodical. After all, whatever your peers pay attention to, you will also concentrate on—so following more-sensible people will help inoculate you against panic.”  (WSJ)
  2. A long term look at the price of gold adjusted for inflation.  (Crossing Wall Street)
  3. Why you should dress up for your next bout of air travel.  (Slate)
  4. What markets are NOT at new all-time highs.  (A Wealth of Common Sense)
  5. Why the stock market (and economy) have flummoxed so many investors.  (A Dash of Insight)
  6. America has stopped watching CNBC.  (Zero Hedge)
  7. Using momentum to optimize portfolio rebalancing.  (SSRN)
  8. The iPhone 6 looks and feels great.  (David Pogue)
  9. How low inflation is affecting current stock valuations.  (The Brooklyn Investor)
  10. A recap of the Value Investing Congress: New York 2014.  (Market Folly)

Here is what else you may have missed on the site this week:

  1. Podcast Friday featuring Peter Thiel.  (Abnormal Returns)
  2. A summary of what Apple ($AAPL) announced and what everyone thought.  (Abnormal Returns)
  3. 30 blogs that mutual fund investors should read.  (MutualFunds)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and  Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Top clicks this week on Abnormal Returns

The post Top clicks this week on Abnormal Returns appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Saturday, 13 Sep 2014 11:00

The weekend is a great time to catch up on some posts that were either too long or simply didn’t fit in during the week. Hope you enjoy!

Investing

Volatility is less important than our reaction to it.  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

On the prospects for the low volatility effect.  (Research Affiliates)

What freestyle chess tells about the advantages of combining fundamental and quantitative methods.  (Credit Suisse)

Does high frequency trading a good thing for the financial system?  (London Review of Books)

What Guy Spiers, author of The Education of a Value Investor: My Transformative Quest for Wealth, Wisdom, and Enlightenment, learned from paying $650,000 for lunch with Warren Buffett.  (Marketwatch)

Personal finance

Jesse Felder, “I’d say that anything more than 0.25% for “managing” a passive portfolio of index ETFs these days is obscene (it’s not even really “managing” if it’s passive – more like “overseeing”).”  (The Felder Report)

Demand for financial advice is not going away.  (Big Picture)

What type of financial advisor works for you?  (Simon Lack)

Just what are the real world benefits from tax loss harvesting?  (ETF)

Psychology

Things you should the know the difference between.  (Morgan Housel)

Three mistakes one investor made.  (Vanguard Blog)

Business

How Blackstone ($BX) made a bundle on the Hilton ($HLT) buyout.  (Businessweek)

The era of platforms makes old valuation techniques obsolete.  (Fred Destin)

Startups

How Andreessen Horowitz became the dominant venture capital firm in Silicon Valley.  (Medium)

Exploding offers suck.  (Y Combinator)

In praise of bootstrapping or the myth of venture capital.  (Recode)

Why founders and VCs should stay in touch even if the VC said no.  (Hunter Walk)

Technology

The downside of the cloud: power-hungry data centers.  (FT Alphaville)

ABDs are finding a home in Silicon Valley.  (CNN)

Autos

Superglues are allowing for lighter cars.  (WSJ)

America has fallen out of love with the station wagon.  (Quartz)

Forecasting

The US intelligence community is looking for new ways to forecast events.  (WSJ)

Why our search for falsifying facts often fall short.  (Above the Market)

Health

A profile of United Therapeutics ($UTHR) CEO Martine Rothblatt.  (New York)

There is little evidence that taking vitamins helps health.  (FiveThirtyEight)

Thinking about Alzheimer’s disease as Type 3 diabetes.  (Big Think)

Time management

The complete guide to being on time.  (Quartz)

Four ways to be a better time manager.  (Scientific American)

Three steps for eliminating bad habits.  (Fast Company)

Food

Food festivals are disgusting.  (Slate)

Why do Americans continue to eat Red Delicious apples?  (Quartz)

Cold cereal sales are in secular decline.  (NYTimes)

Why most of your honey is clover honey.  (Slate)

Want a good meal? Dine early at a restaurant.  (Marginal Revolution)

What professions drink the most coffee?  (Guardian)

Education

Want to fix the Ivy League? Rely on standardized testing.  (Steven Pinker)

Why don’t more men go into teaching?  (NYTimes)

Why it’s time to put the laptops away when class starts.  (Clay Shirky)

Harvard is a big hedge fund with a university attached.  (American Conservative)

The payoff to being a math person has never been higher.  (HBR)

Sports

Running the mile is the new marathon.  (WSJ)

Football exists almost in a parallel world these days.  (New Inquiry)

On the (small) renaissance in pinball.  (WSJ)

Entertainment

Why Schoolhouse Rock was so brilliant.  (The Daily Beast)

Why everyone should read Harry Potter.  (Scientific American)

A profile of Ryan Adams on the cusp of 40.  (BuzzFeed)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

Podcast Friday featuring Peter Thiel.  (Abnormal Returns)

What you might have missed in our Friday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

A dozen things learned from Josh Brown.  (25iq)

Your iPod used to say a lot about who you are.  (Wired)

When did Americans decide to stop growing up?  (NYTimes)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Saturday links:  volatility reactions

The post Saturday links: volatility reactions appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 12 Sep 2014 16:36

Pre-order alert! Patrick O’Shaughnessy’s Millennial Investing: How Young Investors Can Build a Fortune and Gary Antonacci’s Dual Momentum Investing: An Innovative Strategy for Higher Returns with Lower Risk are coming soon.

Quote of the day

Barry Ritholtz, “Sentiment is extremely difficult to use as an indicator because it is only rarely at the extreme readings needed to generate a reliable trading signal.”  (Bloomberg View)

Chart of the day

 Friday links:  extreme readings

Check out the decline in NYSE trading volume over the past decade.  (@Vconomics)

Strategy

Is it worth trying to combine value and momentum?  (Optimal Momentum)

Are you a nerd or a jock when it comes to investing?  (Brian Portnoy)

Do you really have an innovative approach to the market?  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

You are in all likelihood a saver not an investor.  (Pragmatic Capitalism)

Companies

How to fix Darden’s ($DRI) Olive Garden in 300 slides.  (WSJ)

Three stocks that are cheaper than normal.  (Millennial Invest)

The industries most plagued by uncertainty.  (HBR)

Apple

Why Apple’s ($AAPL) timing for Apple Pay is perfect.  (Pando Daily)

Apple’s moat just got a lot wider.  (Vitalily Katsenelson)

Wireless charging still doesn’t work all that well.  (Bits)

Finance

Activist investors are raking in the assets.  (WSJ, Dealbreaker)

LBOs that are getting done are going through with steep multiples.  (Sober Look)

Expectations for Alibaba ($BABA) are really high.  (Fortune)

Funds

Josh Brown, “Actively managed international stock funds are every bit as unlikely to consistently outperform as their US counterparts.”  (The Reformed Broker also Focus on Funds)

ETF statistics for August 2014.  (Invest with an Edge)

Global

The upside of an independent Scottish economy.  (Justin Fox)

Grain stores at are a decade-high.  (FT)

Economy

Why the US dollar is on the rise.  (Business Insider)

Retail sales in August were strong.  (Capital Spectator)

On the prospects for America’s “missing workers” to come back.  (Wonkblog)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

Podcast Friday featuring Peter Thiel.  (Abnormal Returns)

What you might have missed in our Thursday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

The downside of hiring a rich kid as an intern.  (NY Observer)

Attention is gained slowly and lost quickly.  (Lefsetz Letter)

Some great advice for your kids.  (The Week)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Friday links:  extreme readings

The post Friday links: extreme readings appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 12 Sep 2014 15:38

Every week brings a slew of new podcasts. Last week we put up links to some of our favorites. So we are going to try and highlight some interesting listening each week. Enjoy!

How to win the loser’s game: on the importance of low costs to investing success.  (SensibleInvesting, part 2, part 3)

Tim Ferriss talks with Peter Thiel author of Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future.  (Tim Ferriss)

Barry Ritholtz talks with economist David Rosenberg.  (Big Picture)

Everything you need to know about Amazon ($AMZN).  (a16z podcast)

[repeat] An overview of the Apple ($AAPL) product launch day.  (a16z podcast)

Mark Cuban talks about what makes for a great investment pitch.  (TechCrunch)

Paul Craven talks about behavioral economics.  (TEDx)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Podcast Friday:  great pitches

The post Podcast Friday: great pitches appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "Multimedia"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 11 Sep 2014 16:02

Quote of the day

Tim Richards, “In the face of the unknown a little humility is our best protection. Be tentative in your decision making, change your mind if the facts change, diversify widely and don’t go around boasting about your successes: be humble, and become wealthy.”  (The Psy-Fi Blog)

Chart of the day

XOM 0914 524x420 Thursday links:  a little humility

ExxonMobil ($XOM) is losing ground, market cap-wise, to Google ($GOOGL) and Microsoft ($MSFT).  (Bespoke)

Markets

How low inflation is affecting current stock valuations.  (The Brooklyn Investor)

A recap of the Value Investing Congress: New York 2014.  (Market Folly)

Investors hate gold miners.  (Felder Report)

Strategy

Never take investment advice from a political pundit.  (Marketwatch)

Make sure you understand your assumptions when designing a portfolio.  (Humble Student)

Apple

Apple is going after the high value Android users.  (Benedict Evans)

The iPhone 6 looks and feels great.  (David Pogue)

How much progress has Apple made in the past two years?  (Dan Nathan)

What problem does Apple Pay really fix?  (Bits contra WSJ)

What is the purpose of the Apple Watch?  (stratechery also Hodinkee)

Finance

Hedge fund managers shouldn’t be paid for doing nothing.  (Bloomberg)

Experienced analysts continue to flee the big banks.  (WSJ)

Should investors be wary of Alibaba’s ($BABA) books?  (Dealbook)

ETFs

Is there a good reason to buy an actively managed fund?  (Monevator)

Is your balanced fund filled up with junk bonds?  (Morningstar)

Economy

Weekly initial unemployment claims ticked higher last week.  (Calculated Risk)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

What you might have missed in our Wednesday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

More Apple

RIP, the iPod Classic.  (Slate)

How Apple Pay could make you poorer.  (Cass Sunstein)

The U2/Apple hook-up was a big fail.  (Lefsetz Letter also New Yorker)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Thursday links:  a little humility

The post Thursday links: a little humility appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 10 Sep 2014 16:42

You can keep up with all of our posts by signing up for our daily e-mail. Thousands of other readers already have. Don’t miss out!

Quote of the day

Morgan Housel, “You should never blame an irrational market for your terrible performance.”  (The Motley Fool)

Comic of the day

228533.strip Wednesday links:  irrational blame

Dilbert.com

Markets

Defensive sectors and the low volatility anomaly.  (Pension Partners)

What signal can we tease from volatility indicators?  (Capital Spectator)

A cautionary sign for Canadian stocks.  (See It Market)

Emerging markets

Picking among the emerging markets is tough.  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

Emerging markets are ticking up absent a rise in commodity prices.  (Dr. Ed’s Blog)

Strategy

Why the active-passive debate IS important.  (Pragmatic Capitalism)

In praise of portfolio sloth.  (Dan Solin)

Testing optimal rebalancing strategies.  (SSRN via CXOAG)

Companies

A summary of what Apple ($AAPL) announced and what everyone thought.  (Abnormal Returns)

Apple reportedly to buy Path.  (Pando Daily)

Microsoft ($MSFT) to buy the maker of Minecraft.  (WSJ, Dealbook, Bloomberg)

Finance

The big problem with hedge funds: short term capital gains taxes.  (ETF)

Why you should expect to see more yield-focused entities.  (FT Alphaville)

ETFs

When should you trust a new, small ETF?  (ETF)

On the importance of using tracking error in selecting ETFs.  (Matt Hougan)

Global

European REITs are on fire.  (WSJ)

A look at global long-term economic growth.  (Bespoke)

Economy

Why has jobs growth outperformed GDP?  (Bonddad Blog)

Lumber prices are back on the rise.  (Calculated Risk)

How the wealth effect could unwind.  (FT Alphaville)

Under what conditions can housing bubbles exist?  (NBER)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

What you might have missed in our Tuesday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

America loves pumpkin-flavored anything.  (WashingtonPost, Vox)

Why you should dress up for your next bout of air travel.  (Slate)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Wednesday links:  irrational blame

The post Wednesday links: irrational blame appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 10 Sep 2014 15:29

Not every one wants to wade through a bunch of links about Apple and their new products. So please find below a bunch of links covering the announcements yesterday about new iPhones, Apple Pay and the new Apple Watch.

The company

Beware snap judgments about products that haven’t even launched.  (Josh Brown)

Apple dominates the Internet, message-wise.  (Stefan Cheplick)

This is Tim Cook’s Apple now.  (Recode)

Will there ever be another company like Apple ($AAPL)?  (The Real Fly)

Overview

An overview of the Apple launch day.  (a16z podcast)

There is a lot to like in what Apple announced yesterday.  (Kevin Kelleher)

iPhone 6

Apple once again has the best lineup of phones.  (Farhad Manjoo, Business Insider)

Apple is for the foreseeable future the iPhone company.  (MicroFundy)

Apple Pay

Only Apple could really push a new payments ecosystem.  (NYTimes, Pando Daily, WSJ)

Apple is working with the credit card companies.  (Business Insider, Bloomberg)

Apple Pay could be huge.  (Slate)

Apple Watch

What we know about the Apple Watch.  (Pogue, FT)

And what we don’t.  (GigaOM)

The Apple Watch is by definition a more “intimate” device.  (Steven Levy)

Apple has not solved the smart watch dilemma.  (Felix Salmon)

Apple could make the best possible smart watch and it still could fail.  (Pando Daily)

Mixed media

Apple and U2 demonstrated why the album is dead.  (Quartz)

Apple’s livestream was a bust.  (TUAW)

Apple can still wow us.  (Lefsetz Letter)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Apple links:  the smart watch dilemma

The post Apple links: the smart watch dilemma appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "Equities, Technology"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 09 Sep 2014 16:31

Quote of the day

Brian Portnoy, “Never forget: Doing nothing is one of the most under-appreciated skills in investing.”  (The Investor’s Paradox)

Video of the day

Tobias Carlisle author of Deep Value: Why Activist Investors and Other Contrarians Battle for Control of Losing Corporations talks with Tom Keene about avoiding value traps.  (Bloomberg)

US vs. the World

What markets are NOT at new all-time highs.  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

The US stock market has been a standout.  (Short Side of Long)

Stop focusing on CAPE. Other measures show the same story.  (Meb Faber)

Strategy

Portfolio size necessarily affects the ability to generate alpha.  (Alpha Architect)

Moving beyond volatility: four sources of risk.  (Rekenthaler Report)

Academics are discovering the value of trend following.  (Humble Student)

Analysts

How forthrightness makes decision making easier.  (Enterprising Investor)

A nice review for Tom Brakke’s Letters to a Young Analyst.  (Reading the Markets)

One important lesson learned from Guy Spier’s The Education of a Value Investor: My Transformative Quest for Wealth, Wisdom, and Enlightenment.  (Farnam Street)

Food

Where McDonald’s ($MCD) is losing ground with customers.  (Businessweek, Chris Nichols)

Why your drive through experience is slowing down.  (Fast Company via @hughesmatt)

Finance

Where did all the LBOs go?  (Business Insider)

There is a talent bottleneck in the big investment banks.  (FT)

Why is Mario Gabelli the highest paid CEO on Wall Street?  (CNBC)

Global

What the eurozone got wrong about the Great Recession.  (Business Insider)

Economy

Fed officials are facing the point in the cycle where uncertainty is at is maximum.  (Tim Duy)

Small business optimism is trending higher.  (Calculated Risk)

The cost to American homeowners by not refinancing.  (Bloomberg View)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

What you might have missed in our Monday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

Every three minutes a worker’s phone gets remotely wiped by her employer.  (WSJ.D)

Five things CNBC could do to increase viewership.  (Marketwatch)

Nicholas Carr, “Bring back personal blogs. Bring back RSS. Bring back the fun. Screw Big Internet.”  (Rough Type)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Tuesday links:  doing nothing

The post Tuesday links: doing nothing appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 08 Sep 2014 16:25

Quote of the day

Larry Swedroe, “A well-thought-out financial plan is necessary for successful investing, but even the greatest plan won’t bear fruit if an investor doesn’t have the discipline required to stay the course, rebalancing and tax-loss-harvesting as needed.”  (ETF)

Chart of the day

TNX 0914 624x256 Monday links:  staying the course

Just because Treasury yields have stopped going down does not mean they have to go straight up.  (Market Anthropology)

Markets

Fed naysayers have missed out on huge profits on Treasury securities.  (Bloomberg)

A handful of charts including the big corn bear market.  (Short Side of Long)

A long term look at the price of gold adjusted for inflation.  (Crossing Wall Street)

Strategy

Using momentum to optimize portfolio rebalancing.  (SSRN)

How information leaks affect stock prices.  (Adam Grimes)

Size is often the enemy of manager performance.  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

Barry Ritholtz talks with economist David Rosenberg.  (Big Picture)

Companies

The Alibaba ($BABA) IPO is coming. Should we be worried?  (Kid Dynamite also MoneyBeat)

WeChat is a big profit driver for Apple ($AAPL) in China.  (Reuters)

Salesforce.com ($CRM) is launching a venture capital arm.  (Fortune)

Endowments

There is a disconnect between the time horizon of endowments and their alternative asset managers.  (Ashby Monk)

Yale’s endowment fund is becoming climate change-aware.  (Dealbook)

Funds

The SEC wants to step up its oversight of mutual funds and their managers.  (WSJ)

CTAs are closing up shop  in the midst of a long period of underperformance. (FT)

Why five-star funds don’t often stay that way.  (WSJ)

Investors really don’t know wheat they are buying in alternative asset mutual funds.  (FT)

Global

The global economy (and central bankers) are out of synch.  (Business Insider, ibid)

Economy

The case for a more sustainable US economic recovery.  (Gavyn Davies)

Earned income continues to grow.  (Dr. Ed’s Blog)

Have economists been captured by business interests?  (Justin Fox)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

30 blogs that mutual fund investors should read.  (MutualFunds)

What you might have missed in our Sunday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

You aren’t as busy as you think you are.  (Fast Company)

Are autopilots causing pilot skills to atrophy?  (New Yorker)

Networking makes us feel physically ill.  (Science of Us)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Monday links:  staying the course

The post Monday links: staying the course appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Sunday, 07 Sep 2014 12:55

Quote of the day

Jason Zweig, “So try to socialize—in the real world and in online social media—only with investors who are calm and methodical. After all, whatever your peers pay attention to, you will also concentrate on—so following more-sensible people will help inoculate you against panic.”  (WSJ)

Chart of the day

Mexico 0914 Sunday links:  inoculated against panic

The Mexican stock market is sitting at new highs.  (Dana Lyons)

Markets

Why the stock market (and economy) have flummoxed so many investors.  (A Dash of Insight)

This model shows stocks looking unattractive relative to bonds. (Felder Report)The world is operating a much faster rate these days.  (The Reformed Broker)

Strategy

Ben Carlson, “There’s no point in instituting a plan if you’re not going to follow it.”  (A Wealth of Common Sense)

Why managements love share buybacks.  (Aleph Blog)

Why allocation matters so much.  (Pragmatic Capitalism)

Investors with a long-term focus should keep a minimum 60% in stocks come hell or high water.  (WSJ)

Companies

Netflix ($NFLX) wants to increase its short-form content for mobile use.  (GigaOM)

Why Twitter ($TWTR) shouldn’t mess with the timeline.  (Medium contra Marginal Revolution)

Berkshire Hathaway ($BRKB) is the largest cigarette dealer in America.  (Jeff Matthews)

Apple

The valuation situation at Apple has changed a lot over the past few years.  (Millennial Invest)

The hype surrounding Apple right now is pretty high.  (Brett Arends)

Apple stock stalled out at new highs.  (All Star Charts also Adam Grimes)

The case for Tim Cook as Apple CEO.  (Guardian via @mediaredef)

How Apple could make a splash with payment-enabled wearables.  (stratechery)

Jay Yarow talks with Farhad Manjoo ahead of Tuesday’s big Apple ($AAPL) event.  (Business Insider)

Alibaba

No matter how you slice it the Alibaba ($BABA) IPO is going to be huge.  (WSJ, MoneyBeat, Economist)

A profile of Alibaba CEO Jack Ma.  (NYTimes)

The case against investing in Bitcoin.  (Digitopoly)

Global

The week’s nine most important economic charts.  (Quartz)

The case for Russian stocks.  (Short Side of Long)

Economy

The prime working age population is growing again.  (Calculated Risk)

A look back at the economic week that was.  (Bonddad Blog, Big Picture)

The economic schedule for the coming week.  (Calculated Risk)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

Top clicks this week on the site.  (Abnormal Returns)

Smart people for investors to follow.  (Total Return)

Why you shouldn’t watch the market intra-day.  (Abnormal Returns)

What you might have missed in our Saturday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

America has stopped watching CNBC.  (Zero Hedge)

What are we to do with blazing fast Internet, a la Google Fiber?  (NYTimes)

Television viewers are getting older.  (WashingtonPost)

You can support Abnormal Returns by visiting Amazon or follow us on StockTwits, Yahoo Finance and Twitter.

www.FeedBurner.com) Sunday links:  inoculated against panic

The post Sunday links: inoculated against panic appeared first on Abnormal Returns.

Author: "abnormalreturns" Tags: "General"
Comments Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Next page
» You can also retrieve older items : Read
» © All content and copyrights belong to their respective authors.«
» © FeedShow - Online RSS Feeds Reader