• Shortcuts : 'n' next unread feed - 'p' previous unread feed • Styles : 1 2

» Publishers, Monetize your RSS feeds with FeedShow:  More infos  (Show/Hide Ads)


Date: Tuesday, 15 Apr 2014 13:49
The Bechtler Museum of Modern Art opened in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 2009 in a four-story building designed by Swiss architect Mario Botta. It's no surprise then that the museum is celebrating the architect with the major exhibition Mario Botta: Architecture and Memory.


[Photo: Gary O’Brien, via Wikimedia Commons]

The career-spanning exhibition features "30 of his museums, theaters, libraries and religious spaces" documented through "sketches, original wood models and photographs exemplifying Botta’s use of geometric shapes that juxtapose lightness and weight," per the museum's website. The below video gives a peek at the exhibition in the museum's top floor, which extends over the plaza and is propped up by the bowed column.



Mario Botta: Architecture and Memory runs until July 25, 2014.
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 15 Apr 2014 13:18
Here are some photos of SEB Bank and Pension Headquarters (2011) in Copenhagen, Denmark, by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects, photographed by Ximo Michavila.

Lundgaard & Tranberg. SEB Headquarters #2

Lundgaard & Tranberg. SEB Headquarters #5

Lundgaard & Tranberg. SEB Headquarters #1

Lundgaard & Tranberg. SEB Headquarters #9

Lundgaard & Tranberg. SEB Headquarters #3

Lundgaard & Tranberg. SEB Headquarters #6

Lundgaard & Tranberg. SEB Headquarters #7

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool, and/or
:: Tag your photos archidose
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "today's archidose"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 15 Apr 2014 11:20
On Thursday Lebbeus Woods, Architect is opening at the Drawing Center. I'll post about the show next week, but in anticipation of the exhibition I pulled out a book from 1983 that features illustrations by Woods:



The book collects a number of Arthur C. Clarke's short stories that are accompanied by Woods's illustrations. A number of the drawings, including the cover, are clearly the Woods most architects know and love:




Yet some of the drawings are more firmly rooted in the sci-fi narratives and therefore eschew the settings in favor of the characters:




The book was published well before Woods became a household name both for his illustrations and  the environments he imagined. To the same effect, this biography at the back of The Sentinel is much different than ones that might accompany The New City (1992), War and Architecture (1993), and later books:



While the last sentence indicates he might have done more illustrations for sci-fi books, I think this was the only one. If I'm wrong, please comment. I'd be curious about how Woods lent his hand to other stories.
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Sunday, 13 Apr 2014 11:12
Here are two chapels this Sunday one week before Easter.

The Bishop Edward King Chapel (2013) at Ripon Theological College, Oxfordshire, UK, by Niall McLaughlin Architects, photographed by Iqbal Aalam:
Edward King Chapel, Ripon College, Oxfordshire by Niall McLughlin

Edward King Chapel, Ripon College, Oxfordshire by Niall McLughlin

Edward King Chapel, Ripon College, Oxfordshire by Niall McLughlin

Edward King Chapel, Ripon College, Oxfordshire by Niall McLughlin

The MIT Chapel (1955) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, by Eero Saarinen, photographed by Hassan Bagheri:
MIT Chapel

MIT Chapel

MIT Chapel

MIT Chapel

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool, and/or
:: Tag your photos archidose
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "today's archidose"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 11 Apr 2014 13:14
If you haven't been to Ronald Feldman Fine Arts (31 Mercer Street) to see Allan Wexler: Breaking Ground, you have until May 3 to do so. I stopped by on the way to work this morning and can't recommend it enough.


[All photos by John Hill]

The works, which I'd posted about in March, are much larger than I anticipated.



Accompanied by a couple sculptures, the "hand-worked inkjet prints on panels" work really well in the two galleries.





Up close the assemblage of the images really comes across, with some faint grids apparent at first...



And then the make up of the rectangular panels from smaller rectangular prints on closer inspection...



And then the marked intersections seen up close reveal the images were in fact "hand-worked."



Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 09 Apr 2014 17:26
In what might be best described as "LEGO imitating architecture imitating LEGO," BIG's design for the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark, is for sale as a special edition kit:

Lego 4000010 LEGO House
[Photo: Hamid/Flickr]

Lego 4000010 LEGO House
[Photo: Hamid/Flickr]

I'm not sure how much the limited-edition set goes for, or where it's even available, but somebody on ebay wants to get $109 for the "RARE" set with "exclusive minifigure."
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 09 Apr 2014 16:36
Yesterday evening I hitched a ride on the AIANY/Classic Harbor Line cruise as they were celebrating their fifth year of offering architectural boat tours. In addition to the Around Manhattan Architecture Tour that I wrote about previously, the AIANY and Classic Harbor Line are holding other tours:
  • Lower Manhattan Tour
  • Around Manhattan Bridge and Infrastructure Tour
  • Featured Guide Series (Adam Yarinsky on June 15, Signe Nielsen on June 22, Eric Sanderson in the fall, with more TBA)
More information can be found via the Classic Harbor Line link above and on the AIANY website.

Below are some photos from the tour yesterday, which made its way from the boat's slip at Chelsea Piers, south down the Hudson River and around the tip of Manhattan, up the East River to Roosevelt Island, and then back again in a large U-shaped sweep of the island.

Cruisin

Many of the tours depart around 5pm in the evening, meaning that the city is seen in the daylight and as the sun goes down. Seeing the city bathed in the orange glow of the sunset made it easier to brave the strong and chilly winds yesterday. In past tours the boat heads out to the Statue of Liberty first, but yesterday that waited until near the end. Therefore the congestion of Lower Manhattan (above) was particularly palpable as the boat motored by relatively close to shore.

Cruisin

It must be said that being on a boat tour means sensing the sky (above) so much more than one typically does while navigating about the city.

Cruisin

It also means that juxtapositions of one building or structure against another happens frequently...and quickly. Witness the 1-2-3 of the Manhattan Bridge, Brooklyn Bride, and Statue of Liberty below; it was there one moment (thanks to a tip of the tour guide) but gone a few moments later.

Cruisin

The same can be said of the Brooklyn Bridge fitting (almost in my photo below) between 8 Spruce Street and 4WTC as the sun sets in the same spot.

Cruisin

Yesterday's cruise was different than the others I had been on before (one of which I served as a featured tour guide) due to being in the bay when the sun went down.

Cruisin

This made for some great picture postcard views of the Statue of Liberty and Manhattan. Too bad I didn't bring a good camera instead of just my phone.

Cruisin
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 08 Apr 2014 15:09
The Wrong House: The Architecture of Alfred Hitchcock by Steven Jacobs
nai010 publishers, 2013 (second edition)
Paperback, 344 pages
"Rope contributed in no small way to freeing the filmmaker from his obsession with painting and making of him what he had been in the time of Griffith and the pioneers – an architect."
Eric Rohmer and Claude Chabrol, Hitchcock (1957)
This quote is accompanied by seven others at the beginning of Steven Jacobs' book on Alfred Hitchcock, and it serves to reinforce the author's premise that Hitchcock is an architect and therefore deserves a traditional monograph. I doubt anybody would take this premise to mean that Hitchcock  literally worked as an architect, but the role of buildings and their interiors in his films is undeniable. Not only are the buildings he envisioned with his set designers memorable (think of the Bates house from Psycho), but often the rooms, particularly in houses, serve to heighten the suspense and drama of his films. It's as if architectural spaces are a member of the cast, and therefore Hitchcock's sets are worthy of their own "monograph," in this case focused on the domestic realm.



Like other traditional monographs, Jacobs' book includes a couple essays before it launches into the projects. The essays "Space Fright" and "The Tourist Who Knew Too Much" allow Jacobs to paint broad strokes in his analysis of Hitchcock's films (especially on their production), all the while extending his reach beyond the houses and other domestic spaces that populate the book. Hitchcock did not exclusively "design" residential sets, but these spaces allowed him to bring horror "into the home, where it belongs," as he said.

The examples of murder happening close to home are numerous, and Jacobs partitions the 22 films in the book into three chapters: Houses, Country Houses and Mansions, and Modern Hide-Outs and Look-Outs. The films reach back from the director's days in 1920s and 30s London to Marnie from 1964. Most of the residences are treated with floor plans that arise from the author watching the films repeatedly, rather than based on archival plans and other set designs. Therefore the focus is on what is on screen, what the viewer experiences; this means architectural logic and spatial logic aren't always present. Such is the nature of film that sets and spaces serve the narrative reality rather than architectural or an objective reality.


[Spread from chapter on Rear Window, courtesy of nai010]

The book's "projects" are best when the reader has seen the film. I've seen many of Hitchcock's films but only about half of the ones Jacobs analyzes; not having seen a film makes the analysis less desirable while also giving away much of the plot, hardly ideal with suspense films. The projects are also best when they are accompanied by plans; it's unfortunate that some houses are missing them, as they add a layer of information that makes the analyses more understandable and even enjoyable.

Not surprisingly, the chapter on L.B. Jeffries' Greenwich Village apartment in New York City is a highlight, even though the film has been architecturally dissected by many critics, in particular Juhani Pallasmaa and Jeffrey Kipnis. Really, the film can be considered Hitchcock's penultimate example of giving architecture a leading role in a film. It's impossible to think of any portion of the narrative happening outside of the self-contained world the director created. Thankfully the film comes near the end of the book, allowing the reader to digest some of Jacobs' words on earlier films and to see how "the wrong houses" built up to this masterpiece.

Purchase from Amazon: Buy from Amazon.com
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "book-review"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 07 Apr 2014 13:15
Here are some photos of the ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion 2013 (completed spring 2014) in Stuttgart, Germany, by students in the ICD Institute for Computational Design (Prof. Achim Menges) and ITKE Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design (Prof. Jan Knippers) at the Unviersity of Stuttgart, photographed by Trevor Patt.

IMG_7778

IMG_7761

IMG_7769

IMG_7771

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool, and/or
:: Tag your photos archidose
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "today's archidose"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Saturday, 05 Apr 2014 12:10

[All images are screenshots from episode 1 of Cool Spaces!]

This month the four-part documentary series Cool Spaces! is premiering on PBS stations, starting with an episode on "Performance Spaces" and moving on to "Libraries," "Healing Spaces," and "Art Spaces." Host and show creator Stephen Chung, an architect and teacher from Boston, presents three recent buildings that fit the typology in each episode. For "Performance Spaces," which I was able to watch and which I discuss below, the buildings are Dallas Cowboys Stadium in Dallas by HKSArchitects, the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in Kansas City by Safdie Architects, and Barclays Center in Brooklyn by SHoP Architects.

The segments get across information on the building (Barclays Center in this illustrated example) in a fivefold manner:

1. Original footage of the buildings, inside and out:


2. Chung speaking with the architects (in the office and on location) and clients:


3. Chung using a telestrator to highlight parts of a design:


4. Chung speaking with his resident experts, such as structural engineers and acousticians, to explain certain aspects of the building (in this case the Barclays Center's cantilevered oculus):


5. Footage of the spaces being used:


This last is particularly important, given that it is a fairly well accepted norm in determining the success of a building, and because the AIA ads that bookend the show stress use over all other contributions that architects can offer. In the case of the first episode of Cool Spaces! it is measured through visuals, like the packed house above and through Chung's interviews with the architects and clients. There aren't any interviews with the users themselves, and this starts to get at some of the shortcomings of the documentary. By being filtered through the client in particular, use is defined in their terms, rather than those of the people actually using the building. Further, in the case of the Barclays Center segment, the show does not mention the flexible nature of the arena; instead it focuses solely on the Brooklyn Nets basketball team. Frankly, I could do with less of the ESPN-style, slow-motion footage of the Nets' players making lay-ups (screenshot below) to see how the space is outfitted for a Jay-Z show or even a circus.



Also missing from the Barclays Center segment is any mention of the project's beginning, be it Frank Gehry's initial design or the controversy surrounding the mega-development that will platform over the rail yards in Brooklyn. There is about a minute near the end of the piece that discusses the larger development, by showing SHoP's design and fabrication of the modular towers that are rising behind the arena. But overall the show is fairly amnesiac, befitting the name Cool Spaces! (exclamation point and all) and a focus on the contemporary. Sure, Chung mentions Ebbets Field as a precedent for a sports stadium in Brooklyn, but it is in passing and only to highlight where the flagpole in front of Barclays Center came from. The particular histories of how projects came about, at least in the case of Barclays Center, is non-existent. Viewers learn the how and why of a building's form and appearance via the five means of presentation noted above, but the lack of further depth is glaring. Perhaps cutting down to two shows per hour instead of three would remedy this deficiency, but there is obviously some value in more variety in each episode.

These criticisms aside, Cool Spaces! is very good at explaining contemporary architecture to a general audience. The show does an excellent job in explaining why and how a building looks the way it does, which overcomes one impediment to people appreciating new buildings – as ties with the past are broken through architectural forms aiming for innovation and distinction, the understanding of them decreases. Cool Spaces! may not make everybody think that the Barclays Center is beautiful, but it should increase people's appreciation of what goes into designing and making such a building.

A preview of the first episode, "Performance Spaces":


Check the Cool Spaces! schedule to see when the show will be airing in your area.
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "book-review"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 03 Apr 2014 09:49
Here are some photos of the West Terminal Tram Track Electricity Supply Station (2012) in Helsinki, Finland, by Virkkunen & Co Architects, photographed by Arnd Dewald.

Helsinki

Helsinki

Helsinki

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool, and/or
:: Tag your photos archidose
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "today's archidose"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 01 Apr 2014 18:37
In January it was revealed that Rizzoli Bookstore "may have to flee the wrecking ball, again" (NYTimes) to make way for what will most likely be yet another supertall building on 57th Street. Walking past the store today I saw a sign that makes their eviction official:



If you haven't been to Rizzoli's beautiful three-story space in the 109-year-old building at 31 West 57th Street, you have 10 days to do so. Oh, and per their Facebook page, all books and CDs are 40% off!

(For the curious, the photo on the right is taken from a 1964 Glamour photo shoot.)
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 01 Apr 2014 11:14
A week ago I attended a panel discussion at the Syracuse University Fisher Center in New York City. The evening was billed as a book launch for Matthew Stadler's Deventer, one of my favorite books from last year, but it was really a discussion on narrative and architecture through the guise of three books: Deventer, which documents two projects by Dutch architect Matthijs Bouw's One Architecture, Jimenez Lai's graphic novel Citizens of No Place, and Bjarke Ingels's comic monograph Yes Is More. While Mr. BIG was not in attendance, Lai and Bouw were joined by moderator Michael Speaks, Dean of the School of Architecture at Syracuse University, with Stadler participating from Europe via Skype.

Following some introductory remarks from Speaks, Stadler read a chapter from his book, a great one on the Seattle Public Library competition. Stadler served on the jury and recounted in the chapter how the library created a situation (having to do with paper and an overhead projector) that forced the architects to deal with a dilemna in a public context; it enabled the library to learn about the architect before even seeing any designs. Bouw then talked about his work with One Architecture, but the discussion gravitated to one project in particular, a small one ("Space of Unassociation") he executed with Stadler for a writing festival in Canada. With a $1,000 budget for design and construction, Bouw proposed renting a bouncy castle and setting up large sheets for screens within a large space that would be used for readings. Lastly, Lai spoke about his work, particularly Citizens of No Place but also the built work that have recently transplanted his drawings, in particular the Taiwan Pavilion he is designing for the Venice Biennale that starts in June.

So what is the role of narrative in architecture? Like anything, there was no consensus in the panel discussion, with a few (small) disagreements here and there (admittedly, there would have been more if Ingels was in attendance as planned), but a few interesting points came out of the evening:
  • Even the most well developed student work can fall apart if it doesn't have a coherent narrative (a comment by Speaks).
  • There is an apparent Dutch history with architecture and planning incorporating narrative ("scenario planning," Oud's "character driven" architecture), evident in Bouw's use of written narratives in the early stages of projects.
  • Buildings can be seen on a gradient from open to closed, with the former allowing multiple narratives (Space of Unassociation, as one example) and the latter dictating one path or means of interacting with the spaces.
  • Narrative in architecture is ripe for comedy, be it through irony or that based on a previous body of work.
Ultimately, taking comments from the evening but also from elsewhere, I see narrative having three uses in architecture:
  1. Critiquing and/or reconceptualizing architecture,
  2. Aiding the design process,
  3. Explaining a design.
The first is evident in Lai's book, which does not focus on particular real-world projects, while the third is what we see in Stadler's book and BIG's comic monograph. But what about the second?



The fairly laid-back evening brought to mind the latest issue of MAS Context – Narrative – squeezed in between Lai's and Stadler's books above. The extraordinary, extra-thick issue guest edited by architectural scholar Koldo Lus Arana and architect-cartoonist Klaus "tackles the intersection between architectural practices and different forms of visual narrative." Each issue of editor-in-chief Iker Gil's MAX Context is thematic, but this issue is particularly focused, reflecting a heavy hand on the part of the editors and a longer fruition than the other quarterly issues. The focus is strong enough that the three sections of the issue the editors mention – graphic narrative in disciplinary architecture, comic artists making forays into the built world, and looking at the tangents between "emerging animation practices in architecture" and written narratives – are hard to discern. The whole issue is fairly organic, flowing via interviews, comics and essays.

The biggest distinction between Narrative and the evening at the Fisher Center is the form of narrative – the issue of MAS Context focuses almost exclusively on the visual, while the three participants in the panel veer from text only (Stadler) to primarily visual (Lai), with Bouw's use of narrative straddling the two. It's in the visual where I see point 2 above – aiding the design process – being addressed. Narrative is full of contributions that fit into point 1 (much of the critiquing and reconceptualizing coming from outside the profession), but the inclusion of architects like Archigram, Factory Fiftenn and Jones, Partners starts to talk about how narrative expression can influence design. Wes Jones and company's critique of Dubai could have restricted itself to the written word, for example, but by illustrating it as a comic they were forced to give their alternate scenario a form. Like the issue itself, this example shows that there is plenty of overlap in the three uses of narrative above, which makes sense given the multidisciplinary aspect of visual narrative and the way it exists somewhere between idea and built reality. Ultimately both critiques and explanations of architecture can influence architecture, but it would be great to see architects increasingly incorporating narrative (visual or otherwise) into their design processes to better shape their buildings and better understand whom they are designing for.
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "book-review"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 01 Apr 2014 09:01
Materials for Design 2 by Victoria Ballard Bell and Patrick Rand
Princeton Architectural Press, 2014
Paperback, 272 pages



Materials for Design was one of my favorite books I reviewed in 2007 (the book was published in 2006). In it, sixty case studies in five chapters (glass, concrete, wood, metals, and plastics) aim at strengthening the integral relationship between materials and design for students of architecture. The sequel, again penned by Bell and Rand, takes basically the same approach, adding masonry as a sixth chapter, but otherwise staying with the same format (and even the same tally of projects) that made the first book so good, all the while improving upon the few deficiencies of the first book (for me, that was mainly the inconsistent nature of the detail drawings).

The focus is still on educating students (some of the content came actually from a graduate seminar Rand taught at NC State University), but this time there is an awareness of the increasing popularity of design/build programs in American architectural schools as well as those abroad. There are Rural Studio, Studio 804, and design/buildLAB, to name just a few. But Studio 804 out of Lawrence, Kansas, is the only design/build program with a project in Materials for Design 2. This is too bad, not only considering the explicit reference to such programs in the book, but also because these academic programs are often laboratories for experimenting with materials. Think of early Rural Studio, such as the chapel made from car windshields, or almost any recent Solar Decathlon project, and material innovation is somewhere to be found.

The projects vary greatly in terms of geography, appearance, and how they creatively use their respective materials. The main consistency is a scale, as all of the buildings are quite small: ranging from a one-room pavilion in Basel to a seven-story office building in Copenhagen. This points to the fact small buildings offer room for experimentation with materials, since their scale does not require as great an investment as, say, a skyscraper, stadium or airport. Further, a number of the projects are temporary structures (making the Solar Decathlon omission glaring) – Thomas Heatherwick's UK Pavilion at the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai and the Italian Pavilion by Iodice Architetti at the same Expo, to name a couple – which signals the innovation opportunities that expos and other exhibitions allow.

The most welcome change from the first book is the addition of masonry as one of the material chapters. This is apparent even before opening the book, given how the glazed ceramic rods of Sauerbruch Hutton's Brandhorst Museum in Munich graces the cover. There are also traditional applications of brick as load-bearing walls, but this chapter alone shows the innovation that can happen in the make-up of the materials, how they are combined, and what sort of architecture they create. Not surprisingly, I lean toward the porous masonry walls of Anagram's South Asian Human Rights Documentation Center, Arturo Franco's Warehouse 8B Conversion, and Archi-Union's J-Office + Silk Wall. While one of the oldest materials, the contemporary uses of masonry show its design possibilities, like the materials in the rest of the book, are hardly exhausted.

Purchase from Amazon: Buy from Amazon.com
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "book-review"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 31 Mar 2014 11:13
It was back in 2000 when I learned about Kowloon Walled City (via MVRDV's FARMAX), and my interest in the vertical slum, as it's been called, was great enough that I wrote a piece about it for a friend's website that summer. Most of the photographs I used were pilfered from Greg Girard and Ian Lambot's definitive account of the late KWC, City of Darkness. In the meantime I've discovered a number of books on KWC (most Japanese, for some reason), but none of them come close to the duo's book in terms of capturing the impressive physical form of the place but also the lives of the people that called the place home (a focus on the former over the latter is the source of much criticism over KWC's ongoing popularity with architects).



I'm delighted to learn that Girard and Lambot are updating their "book of record" on KWC. Per their Kickstarter page, where they are trying to raise £50,000 toward the update, "City of Darkness Revisited, an all-new edition that will combine the best of the original book with several new sections that will fill in some of the gaps and bring the story up to date." In addition to the Kickstarter page, much more information on City of Darkness Revisited can be found on their website.

And for a film history of KWC, check out this 10-minute study created by students at the University of Waterloo, found via the Kickstarter page:

Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Saturday, 29 Mar 2014 10:13
Here are some photos of the Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastián, Spain, by VAUMM (2011), photographed by Ximo Michavila. Back in 2012 I featured photos of the building's exterior and balconies, so the below photos focus on the interior.

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #1

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #7

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #14

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #4

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #18

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #17

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #6

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #16

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #15

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #10

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #2

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #21

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #20

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #3

VAUMM. Basque Culinary Center #19

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool, and/or
:: Tag your photos archidose
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "today's archidose"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 27 Mar 2014 15:00
Today would be Mies van der Rohe's 128th birthday. This year Google did not opt to "celebrate" it with a doodle, but they did so two years ago:

mies-126.jpg

I probably wouldn't have taken notice of this anniversary either, except for two recent projects – one built, one a competition – that both reference Mies in different ways.

First is the Allianz Headquarters designed by Wiel Arets and just completed in Zürich:


Per the website of the architect who happens to now head the Mies's Illinois Institute of Technology: "This new district’s master plan mandated that all building façades be composed of natural stone, yet it was chosen to frit this building’s full glass façade with an abstracted pattern of Onyx marble–from Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion." (my emphasis)



The second project is OMA's winning design for the Axel Springer media center in Berlin. Announced on the firm's website today, the design that bested former OMA employees Bjarke Ingels and Ole Scheeren includes a photo of the model next to a drawing of Mies van der Rohe's famous Friedrichstrasse office building proposed for Berlin in 1922:


OMA's model appears to use the thick and wavy vertical lines of the all-glass triangular skyscraper as an image on its façade, much like Arets printed the Barcelona Pavilion's marble on the glass in Zürich. For decades, Mies influenced the forms of buildings, but if these projects are any indication, that influence has segued into graphics covering more complex (if still glass box) forms. These make me wonder if there is more "Mies worship" to come.
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 27 Mar 2014 13:00
Not many graphic novels treat buildings and cities as an integral part of their stories, so I'm intrigued by War of Streets and Houses, a new graphic memoir from cartoonist and author Sophie Yanow.


[All images via Uncivilized Books]

Text from the publisher:
The War of Streets and Houses is named after General Thomas Bugeaud's 19th century essay; the first manual for the preparation and conduct of urban warfare. The text greatly influenced Baron Haussmann’s famous re-development of Paris, and the planning of modern cities. In 2012 the author participated in the massive Montreal student strikes. In the midst of protesting crowds and police kettles, the military origins of urban planning suddenly became an undeniable reality. Sophie Yanow’s most ambitious work to date deftly melds the history of urban planning, theories of control with personal experiences of political activism.






(via Atlantic Cities)

Available at Buy from Amazon.com
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "book-moment"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 27 Mar 2014 12:10
A couple years ago I attended the 2012 Facades Conference in New York City, what turned out to be a jam-packed day of design, technology and engineering focused on, naturally, facades. The 2014 conference, Facades+ Performance, takes place April 24 and 25 – the symposium on the 24th takes place in the CUNY Graduate Center's Proshansky Auditorium, and the workshops on the 25th are held at the Pratt Manhattan Campus. Click the image below for more information and to register for the event.

Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 26 Mar 2014 11:00
Here are some photos of the HBKU Student Center (2011) in Doha, Qatar, by Legorreta + Legorreta, photographed by Asli Aydin.

HBKU Student Center

Central patio designed with Jan Hendrix.
HBKU Student Center

HBKU Student Center

HBKU Student Center

HBKU Student Center

HBKU Student Center

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool, and/or
:: Tag your photos archidose
Author: "John Hill (noreply@blogger.com)" Tags: "today's archidose"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Next page
» You can also retrieve older items : Read
» © All content and copyrights belong to their respective authors.«
» © FeedShow - Online RSS Feeds Reader