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Date: Sunday, 14 Sep 2014 23:33

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

One more time: No, wearing a bra does not cause cancer (David Gorski)  The idea that bras cause cancer is a myth that refuses to die. Bras do not impair lymph drainage or interfere with the removal of “toxins.” A new study confirms what other studies have shown: no correlation of bra-wearing with cancer.

The Reality of Ancient Wisdom: Acupuncture and TCM Weren’t So Great (Harriet Hall)  An old book by a missionary doctor in China describes what traditional Chinese medicine was really like in 1883-1913. It was prescientific, superstitious, ineffective, and sometimes barbaric. Acupuncture bore little resemblance to today’s practices, and serious complications were common. These revelations serve as a reality check: acupuncture and TCM are evidence of ancient ignorance, not ancient wisdom.

Autism Prevalence Unchanged in 20 Years (Steven Novella)  There is no autism epidemic. The number of diagnoses has increased, but the evidence strongly suggests this is due to better diagnosis, changing definitions, and greater acceptance. A new study looked at autism prevalence around the world; it showed no change from 1990 to 2010.

Side effects may include liver failure (Scott Gavura)  Dietary supplements are popular and widely believed to be safe. But there have been many cases of supplements causing liver failure leading to death or liver transplant; and harms are likely under-reported. Contamination of supplement products and lack of routine monitoring are worrisome. 

Legislating Ignorance (John Snyder)   A Florida law prohibits doctors from asking patients about guns in the home. This is unwarranted legislative interference with the practice of good preventive medicine by pediatricians who feel ethically obligated to counsel parents about gun safety along with other accident prevention issues. There is good evidence that counseling has a positive impact on safe storage of guns in the home. Legislation has also interfered with science by regulating the funding of gun control studies.

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Sunday, 14 Sep 2014 23:33

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

One more time: No, wearing a bra does not cause cancer (David Gorski)  The idea that bras cause cancer is a myth that refuses to die. Bras do not impair lymph drainage or interfere with the removal of “toxins.” A new study confirms what other studies have shown: no correlation of bra-wearing with cancer.

The Reality of Ancient Wisdom: Acupuncture and TCM Weren’t So Great (Harriet Hall)  An old book by a missionary doctor in China describes what traditional Chinese medicine was really like in 1883-1913. It was prescientific, superstitious, ineffective, and sometimes barbaric. Acupuncture bore little resemblance to today’s practices, and serious complications were common. These revelations serve as a reality check: acupuncture and TCM are evidence of ancient ignorance, not ancient wisdom.

Autism Prevalence Unchanged in 20 Years (Steven Novella)  There is no autism epidemic. The number of diagnoses has increased, but the evidence strongly suggests this is due to better diagnosis, changing definitions, and greater acceptance. A new study looked at autism prevalence around the world; it showed no change from 1990 to 2010.

Side effects may include liver failure (Scott Gavura)  Dietary supplements are popular and widely believed to be safe. But there have been many cases of supplements causing liver failure leading to death or liver transplant; and harms are likely under-reported. Contamination of supplement products and lack of routine monitoring are worrisome. 

Legislating Ignorance (John Snyder)   A Florida law prohibits doctors from asking patients about guns in the home. This is unwarranted legislative interference with the practice of good preventive medicine by pediatricians who feel ethically obligated to counsel parents about gun safety along with other accident prevention issues. There is good evidence that counseling has a positive impact on safe storage of guns in the home. Legislation has also interfered with science by regulating the funding of gun control studies.

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Monday, 08 Sep 2014 16:42

 Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

The “CDC whistleblower saga”: Updates, backlash, and (I hope) a wrap-up (David Gorski)  Whistleblower William Thompson alleged CDC malfeasance in withholding data from a vaccine study. The CDC has now issued a statement, and Hooker’s paper re-analyzing the data has been removed from the public domain because of serious concerns about the validity of its conclusions. Anti-vaccine activists are leaking documents and issuing threats, and much remains to be explained; but the CDC conspiracy theory is implausible and not supported by the evidence.

The Unpersuadables (Harriet Hall)   A new book by Will Storr investigates why some people irrationally reject information showing their beliefs are false. Our brains systematically deceive us with illusions and errors in thinking; we create models of reality and try to explain away anything that doesn’t match. We are inherently fonder of stories than of science. Being unpersuadable is an evolved human characteristic; we must learn to overcome the limitations of our prehistoric brains.

CAM and Headaches (Steven Novella)   A recent editorial about the treatment of headaches propagates many misconceptions about CAM. It exaggerates CAM’s popularity, blurs the line between CAM and scientific medicine by including things like exercise, pretends that “Western” medicine is just an arbitrary historical choice, and tries to justify CAM modalities that have been disproven. 

Chiropractic “pediatrics” firmly in the anti-vaccination camp (Jann Bellamy)   Anti-vaccine speakers have been invited to the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association’s upcoming conference. The chiropractic position on vaccines ranges from virulently anti-vaccination to tepid support from a minority. It is scary to think they are promoting themselves as primary care physicians and pediatricians.

Ebola SCAMS (Mark Crislip)   Some homeopaths are telling people how to make their own Ebola remedy at home, starting with body fluids from an infected person. Others offer an MP3 file of homeopathic remedy energy. Nano silver is another alleged remedy. This kind of lunacy capitalizes on fears of Ebola and could lead to fatal consequences. 

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Monday, 08 Sep 2014 16:42

 Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

The “CDC whistleblower saga”: Updates, backlash, and (I hope) a wrap-up (David Gorski)  Whistleblower William Thompson alleged CDC malfeasance in withholding data from a vaccine study. The CDC has now issued a statement, and Hooker’s paper re-analyzing the data has been removed from the public domain because of serious concerns about the validity of its conclusions. Anti-vaccine activists are leaking documents and issuing threats, and much remains to be explained; but the CDC conspiracy theory is implausible and not supported by the evidence.

The Unpersuadables (Harriet Hall)   A new book by Will Storr investigates why some people irrationally reject information showing their beliefs are false. Our brains systematically deceive us with illusions and errors in thinking; we create models of reality and try to explain away anything that doesn’t match. We are inherently fonder of stories than of science. Being unpersuadable is an evolved human characteristic; we must learn to overcome the limitations of our prehistoric brains.

CAM and Headaches (Steven Novella)   A recent editorial about the treatment of headaches propagates many misconceptions about CAM. It exaggerates CAM’s popularity, blurs the line between CAM and scientific medicine by including things like exercise, pretends that “Western” medicine is just an arbitrary historical choice, and tries to justify CAM modalities that have been disproven. 

Chiropractic “pediatrics” firmly in the anti-vaccination camp (Jann Bellamy)   Anti-vaccine speakers have been invited to the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association’s upcoming conference. The chiropractic position on vaccines ranges from virulently anti-vaccination to tepid support from a minority. It is scary to think they are promoting themselves as primary care physicians and pediatricians.

Ebola SCAMS (Mark Crislip)   Some homeopaths are telling people how to make their own Ebola remedy at home, starting with body fluids from an infected person. Others offer an MP3 file of homeopathic remedy energy. Nano silver is another alleged remedy. This kind of lunacy capitalizes on fears of Ebola and could lead to fatal consequences. 

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Tuesday, 02 Sep 2014 18:54

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

Did a high ranking whistleblower really reveal that the CDC covered up proof that vaccines cause autism in African-American boys? (David Gorski)
Anti-vaccine sources erupted over reports that a whistleblower had confessed to fraud in the CDC, saying that when he and his co-authors published a study 10 years ago, they covered up a link between the MMR vaccine and autism in a subgroup of African-American boys. Anti-vaccine activist Brian Hooker published a flawed, questionable re-analysis of the data. We don’t yet know the whole story, but this appears to be just an ideological tempest in a teacup; and it does nothing to change the scientific consensus on vaccines.

Diet Cults vs. Science-Based Healthy Eating (Harriet Hall)  
In his book Diet Cults, Matt Fitzgerald argues that science has established quite definitively that there is no one healthiest diet: humans evolved to adapt and thrive on a variety of diets. He debunks the Paleo and other popular diets and shows that their advocates are swayed by emotional and moral influences. He proposes an informal diet guide consisting of a hierarchy of healthier-to-less healthy foods that is flexible, accommodates individual preferences, and that most nutrition experts would endorse based on the best available evidence we have at this point.

Bad Science Journals (Steven Novella)  Open-access online journals charge the author to publish. Some of them are fraudulent, falsely representing themselves as peer-reviewed and trading on the reputation of journals formerly published in print. Half of the dubious journals accepted a bogus nonsense article for publication.

Naturopathy vs. Science: Facts Edition (Scott Gavura)  A comparison of naturopathy websites and Wikipedia entries on subjects like homeopathy, adrenal fatigue, candidiasis, and black cohosh is illuminating. Naturopaths claim to base their practice on scientific principles; but it is obvious that they endorse many non-science-based diagnoses and treatments and are often openly antagonistic to science, even saying the scientific method is not applicable to what they do.

A Touch to Fear: Chiropractic and the Newborn Baby (Clay Jones)
Some chiropractors treat newborns and consider themselves qualified to act as pediatric primary care providers. A chiropractor described what he did when called by a midwife to treat a fussy baby right after a home birth. His incompetence was obvious, and the outcome could well have been disastrous. Chiropractors do not have the training to evaluate newborns; chiropractic “adjustments” of newborns are never indicated and could be dangerous.  

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 02 Sep 2014 18:54

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

Did a high ranking whistleblower really reveal that the CDC covered up proof that vaccines cause autism in African-American boys? (David Gorski)
Anti-vaccine sources erupted over reports that a whistleblower had confessed to fraud in the CDC, saying that when he and his co-authors published a study 10 years ago, they covered up a link between the MMR vaccine and autism in a subgroup of African-American boys. Anti-vaccine activist Brian Hooker published a flawed, questionable re-analysis of the data. We don’t yet know the whole story, but this appears to be just an ideological tempest in a teacup; and it does nothing to change the scientific consensus on vaccines.

Diet Cults vs. Science-Based Healthy Eating (Harriet Hall)  
In his book Diet Cults, Matt Fitzgerald argues that science has established quite definitively that there is no one healthiest diet: humans evolved to adapt and thrive on a variety of diets. He debunks the Paleo and other popular diets and shows that their advocates are swayed by emotional and moral influences. He proposes an informal diet guide consisting of a hierarchy of healthier-to-less healthy foods that is flexible, accommodates individual preferences, and that most nutrition experts would endorse based on the best available evidence we have at this point.

Bad Science Journals (Steven Novella)  Open-access online journals charge the author to publish. Some of them are fraudulent, falsely representing themselves as peer-reviewed and trading on the reputation of journals formerly published in print. Half of the dubious journals accepted a bogus nonsense article for publication.

Naturopathy vs. Science: Facts Edition (Scott Gavura)  A comparison of naturopathy websites and Wikipedia entries on subjects like homeopathy, adrenal fatigue, candidiasis, and black cohosh is illuminating. Naturopaths claim to base their practice on scientific principles; but it is obvious that they endorse many non-science-based diagnoses and treatments and are often openly antagonistic to science, even saying the scientific method is not applicable to what they do.

A Touch to Fear: Chiropractic and the Newborn Baby (Clay Jones)
Some chiropractors treat newborns and consider themselves qualified to act as pediatric primary care providers. A chiropractor described what he did when called by a midwife to treat a fussy baby right after a home birth. His incompetence was obvious, and the outcome could well have been disastrous. Chiropractors do not have the training to evaluate newborns; chiropractic “adjustments” of newborns are never indicated and could be dangerous.  

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Monday, 01 Sep 2014 18:55

The Science-based Medicine summaries return! 

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

The false dichotomies of CAM and “integrative medicine” (David Gorski)  
Victoria Stern uses faulty reasoning to argue that while alternative medicine is bad, integrative medicine (that integrates alternative with conventional medicine) is good. She seems to think that only integrative medicine can address the “whole” patient and that it is necessary to embrace quackery in order to form a “true bond” between doctor and patient.

“Atavistic oncology” revisited: Dr. Frank Arguello responds (David Gorski)  Dr. Gorski criticized Dr. Arguello’s “atavistic chemotherapy” because it is untested, based on a questionable rationale, unpublished, and not even properly defined. Dr. Arguello demanded that he retract the article. His letters and e-mails (reproduced here in full) consist not of a rational response to Gorski’s criticisms, but of insults, ad hominem arguments, threats of legal action, letters to Dr. Gorski’s employers, excuses, and a challenge in the form of an experiment on a patient that would be unethical and that he had not even asked the patient about.

Pass the Salt (But Not That Pink Himalayan Stuff) (Harriet Hall) Three recent articles confirm the understanding that too much salt is bad for health but provide evidence that too little salt is harmful too. Existing guidelines may be too extreme. Pink Himalayan salt has been recommended (by unreliable sources) because it contains 84 trace minerals, but some of those minerals are radioactive and poisonous.

Vitamin K Refusal – The New Anti-Vax (Steven Novella)  Some parents are endangering the health of their newborns by refusing the routine vitamin K injection that protects children for 6 months until they start getting enough vitamin K in their diet. Without this supplementation, there is a small but devastating risk of bleeding, brain damage, and even death. Irrational adherence to the naturalistic fallacy is largely to blame for both vaccine refusal and vitamin K refusal.

Clinical trials of integrative medicine: testing whether magic works? (David Gorski)  David Gorski and Steven Novella have managed to get an article published in a very good medical journal to present the SBM view. They show why randomized clinical trials of highly implausible CAM treatments such as homeopathy or reiki should be discouraged.

Tens of millions for CAM research – and it’s all on your dime (Jann Bellamy)  The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 was enacted to empower citizens to hold the government responsible for wasteful spending. Millions are being spent on research into acupuncture, chiropractic, naturopathy, homeopathy, and improbable treatments like chelation for heart disease. It’s time to stop wasting government money that could be better spent on more plausible areas of research.

That’s So Chiropractic (Mark Crislip)  A study attempted to correlate spinal health to overall wellness by dissecting 75 human cadavers and attributing diseases of the internal organs to misalignments of the vertebrae. Another trial with only 14 patients and no controls purported to show that chiropractic effectively treats autism. Such studies are methodologically horrible and useless. Chiropractors continue to discourage vaccination, to deny the risks of neck manipulations, and to offer unsubstantiated theories; and yet they want to become primary care providers!  

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Monday, 01 Sep 2014 18:55

The Science-based Medicine summaries return! 

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

The false dichotomies of CAM and “integrative medicine” (David Gorski)  
Victoria Stern uses faulty reasoning to argue that while alternative medicine is bad, integrative medicine (that integrates alternative with conventional medicine) is good. She seems to think that only integrative medicine can address the “whole” patient and that it is necessary to embrace quackery in order to form a “true bond” between doctor and patient.

“Atavistic oncology” revisited: Dr. Frank Arguello responds (David Gorski)  Dr. Gorski criticized Dr. Arguello’s “atavistic chemotherapy” because it is untested, based on a questionable rationale, unpublished, and not even properly defined. Dr. Arguello demanded that he retract the article. His letters and e-mails (reproduced here in full) consist not of a rational response to Gorski’s criticisms, but of insults, ad hominem arguments, threats of legal action, letters to Dr. Gorski’s employers, excuses, and a challenge in the form of an experiment on a patient that would be unethical and that he had not even asked the patient about.

Pass the Salt (But Not That Pink Himalayan Stuff) (Harriet Hall) Three recent articles confirm the understanding that too much salt is bad for health but provide evidence that too little salt is harmful too. Existing guidelines may be too extreme. Pink Himalayan salt has been recommended (by unreliable sources) because it contains 84 trace minerals, but some of those minerals are radioactive and poisonous.

Vitamin K Refusal – The New Anti-Vax (Steven Novella)  Some parents are endangering the health of their newborns by refusing the routine vitamin K injection that protects children for 6 months until they start getting enough vitamin K in their diet. Without this supplementation, there is a small but devastating risk of bleeding, brain damage, and even death. Irrational adherence to the naturalistic fallacy is largely to blame for both vaccine refusal and vitamin K refusal.

Clinical trials of integrative medicine: testing whether magic works? (David Gorski)  David Gorski and Steven Novella have managed to get an article published in a very good medical journal to present the SBM view. They show why randomized clinical trials of highly implausible CAM treatments such as homeopathy or reiki should be discouraged.

Tens of millions for CAM research – and it’s all on your dime (Jann Bellamy)  The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 was enacted to empower citizens to hold the government responsible for wasteful spending. Millions are being spent on research into acupuncture, chiropractic, naturopathy, homeopathy, and improbable treatments like chelation for heart disease. It’s time to stop wasting government money that could be better spent on more plausible areas of research.

That’s So Chiropractic (Mark Crislip)  A study attempted to correlate spinal health to overall wellness by dissecting 75 human cadavers and attributing diseases of the internal organs to misalignments of the vertebrae. Another trial with only 14 patients and no controls purported to show that chiropractic effectively treats autism. Such studies are methodologically horrible and useless. Chiropractors continue to discourage vaccination, to deny the risks of neck manipulations, and to offer unsubstantiated theories; and yet they want to become primary care providers!  

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Friday, 01 Aug 2014 17:52

 

IT NEVER ENDS…  Even though the UK finally caught, charged, and convicted the man - James McCormick - who sold thousands of spurious “bomb detectors” all through the Middle East, those same devices – simply glorified dowsing rods with fake electronics installed – are still being sold and used in Iraq, causing wounding and death to personnel who unwittingly wave them about, believing that they work. They don’t, and the JREF has for years now issued warnings that have gone unheeded, yet we have never received credit for our work. Though I was personally contacted by the Avon & Somerset Constabulary in 2012 and asked to attend McCormick’s trial in the UK as an expert witness, and I reserved the time to do so, I found that the trial took place without my receiving any notice.

This, unfortunately, is all too common a practice. In the past, I have similarly been consulted by the FBI, have provided useful information that resulted in similar convictions, and have never received any credit to the JREF for our co-operation. 

In The New York Times, sent to me by my friend Chip Taylor in Vermont, I see that the ADE651 – the one which McCormick peddled (see the Wikipedia page of the device for a full account)  – is still relied upon. Says The Times:

The Iraqi government bought thousands of the devices that international bomb detection experts have described as about as useful as a “Ouja board.”

 

Although at one point the government made an effort to get rid of them, they are still used a many police checkpoints and at the entrance to the Green Zone, where many embassies are, as well as offices for top government officials.

 

 

Check in with Doubtful News for the latest in convictions surrounding fake bomb detectors.

 

SO MUCH FOR AUTHORITY BY DEGREE… Dr. Jeffrey Mishlove – a real PhD, a “doctor of parapsychology,” folks, wrote a massive 380-page thick, 8½” X 11” book, “The Roots of Consciousness” (1976) which is chock full of half-endorsements, suggestions, faint praise, almost-evidence and simple rumors about a wide variety of “psychics” and “sensitives,” the author just-about endorses. In his blogging activities since, he has also managed to misunderstand the Million Dollar Challenge with rare inaccuracy. For example, he wrote:

 

Although on the popular media scene many magicians – such as the Amazing Randi have claimed that they can duplicate parapsychological effects using magic tricks, they have consistently been unable or unwilling to do so under controlled laboratory conditions (Eisenbud 1975).

 

Well, let’s examine that statement. It’s attributed to Dr. Jule Eisenbud [1908-1999], who challenged me to duplicate what he claimed that “psychic” Ted Serios [1918-2006] had done under ridiculous conditions, tricks that everyone but Eisenbud easily solved. My response to him was that if Serios could really do such demos under double-blind, controlled conditions – the conditions under which such tests must always be done – I would run a test for the JREF (James Randi Educational Foundation) million-dollar prize. Though Dr. Eisenbud simply refused to respond to that notice, Dr. Mishlove has no problem citing him…

In another entry on Dr. Mishlove’s blog “The “Pigasus Award Ironies,” he wrote this:

 

But, I believe Randi’s offer is a scam. And, I will say why I believe it to be so, in very simple terms. First of all, there is no doubt that Randi has used his alleged offer – over a period of many years – to generate enormous publicity for himself and his cult of debunkers.

 

Well, I deny having a “cult” going, of course, but I’m very pleased and satisfied that the JREF’s work has resulted in copious news interest. But Dr. Mishlove moved ahead. I’ll handle each point he offered:

 

Second of all, Randi’s offer sets himself up as judge and jury.

 

Au contraire, Dr. Mishlove. It is clearly stated in the rules for the Challenge that there will be neither judge not jury, as a quick glance would have informed you – had you cared to look. We conduct the tests – always with the agreement of the challenger – in such a way that the results are self-evident to all; no assessment is necessary. For example: You can fly by flapping your arms? Okay, let’s see. Lean out this window, ma’am…  Oops…! Next candidate…

 

And next point:

 

And, of course, he [Randi] has not the slightest interest in losing the very game that he has created.

 

Yes, this is true, but we quaver not…

 

A true prize would have an independent panel of neutral judges – and these judges, not Randi, should be in control of prize money, to determine if and when it shall be released. 

 

See above. The results are always – by experimental design – plainly evident. Next…

 

So while James Randi and his cult go around accusing the general public of falling for a wide variety of psychic scams, they themselves are engaged in perpetrating a scam of an equal and opposite sort.

 

Oh, I think not, doctor. As you very well know, the “general public” certainly does “fall for a wide variety of psychic scams,” as you suggest, but there is no deception in the JREF challenge, as anyone can determine by examining our procedures and our assets. It is available to anyone who asks – which you did not care to do before you rushed “The Pigasus Award Ironies” into print. To conclude:

 

The final irony is that they are the very near a mirror image of the phonies they try to expose.

 

As long as they set about exposing the true frauds and schemes in the psychic world, they do the world a service. And, I applaud Randi and his ilk for that. But, in their fanatical zeal, they sometimes endeavor to put a stop to legitimate scientific and academic inquiry. (I know this, first hand, as they attempted to interfere with my own doctoral degree program in parapsychology at the University of California, Berkeley.) When they go this far, as they did with Brenda Dunne, they simply reveal the philosophical and moral emptiness of their position.

 

I am unaware of any interference applied to either Dr. Mishlove’s or Ms. Dunne’s doctoral degree program, and would wish to have details of this affront. I would very much like to have contact information for Dr. Jeffrey Mishlove, so that I might clear up that misunderstanding.  Can anyone supply that information?

Stay tuned…

 

TAM 2014  The general consensus among TAM-goers is that this year’s gathering was the best ever.  We’ll have a summary of the activities for you shortly, delayed only by the fact that I’m on my way to Toronto, Aspen, and Québec in the next few weeks to accompany screenings of our film, “An Honest Liar,” which most of the folks at TAM 2014 saw, and expressed their satisfaction with it. Then, in December, I’ll be touring Australia, as well. So, here’s my message for that continent:

 

G'day Australia! This is James Randi. Remember me? If you haven't already heard, I’m coming to visit you in December, this time travelling to Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney between Dec. 3rd and 7th, exclusively screening our 90-minute film “An Honest Liar” at “An evening with James Randi” on this trip Down Under. It’s full of surprises, and will be followed by a Q-and-A session that you’ll long remember! For more information and/or to purchase tickets, please go to ThinkInc.org I’m looking forward to seeing many of my old friends, and exchanging useful ideas and experiences once more!

 

I’ll be doing my best to keep in touch with Swifters while away.

 

That’s all for now, dear friends…

 

James Randi

 

Author: "astonishing@randi.org (James Randi)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Friday, 01 Aug 2014 17:52

 

IT NEVER ENDS…  Even though the UK finally caught, charged, and convicted the man - James McCormick - who sold thousands of spurious “bomb detectors” all through the Middle East, those same devices – simply glorified dowsing rods with fake electronics installed – are still being sold and used in Iraq, causing wounding and death to personnel who unwittingly wave them about, believing that they work. They don’t, and the JREF has for years now issued warnings that have gone unheeded, yet we have never received credit for our work. Though I was personally contacted by the Avon & Somerset Constabulary in 2012 and asked to attend McCormick’s trial in the UK as an expert witness, and I reserved the time to do so, I found that the trial took place without my receiving any notice.

This, unfortunately, is all too common a practice. In the past, I have similarly been consulted by the FBI, have provided useful information that resulted in similar convictions, and have never received any credit to the JREF for our co-operation. 

In The New York Times, sent to me by my friend Chip Taylor in Vermont, I see that the ADE651 – the one which McCormick peddled (see the Wikipedia page of the device for a full account)  – is still relied upon. Says The Times:

The Iraqi government bought thousands of the devices that international bomb detection experts have described as about as useful as a “Ouja board.”

 

Although at one point the government made an effort to get rid of them, they are still used a many police checkpoints and at the entrance to the Green Zone, where many embassies are, as well as offices for top government officials.

 

 

Check in with Doubtful News for the latest in convictions surrounding fake bomb detectors.

 

SO MUCH FOR AUTHORITY BY DEGREE… Dr. Jeffrey Mishlove – a real PhD, a “doctor of parapsychology,” folks, wrote a massive 380-page thick, 8½” X 11” book, “The Roots of Consciousness” (1976) which is chock full of half-endorsements, suggestions, faint praise, almost-evidence and simple rumors about a wide variety of “psychics” and “sensitives,” the author just-about endorses. In his blogging activities since, he has also managed to misunderstand the Million Dollar Challenge with rare inaccuracy. For example, he wrote:

 

Although on the popular media scene many magicians – such as the Amazing Randi have claimed that they can duplicate parapsychological effects using magic tricks, they have consistently been unable or unwilling to do so under controlled laboratory conditions (Eisenbud 1975).

 

Well, let’s examine that statement. It’s attributed to Dr. Jule Eisenbud [1908-1999], who challenged me to duplicate what he claimed that “psychic” Ted Serios [1918-2006] had done under ridiculous conditions, tricks that everyone but Eisenbud easily solved. My response to him was that if Serios could really do such demos under double-blind, controlled conditions – the conditions under which such tests must always be done – I would run a test for the JREF (James Randi Educational Foundation) million-dollar prize. Though Dr. Eisenbud simply refused to respond to that notice, Dr. Mishlove has no problem citing him…

In another entry on Dr. Mishlove’s blog “The “Pigasus Award Ironies,” he wrote this:

 

But, I believe Randi’s offer is a scam. And, I will say why I believe it to be so, in very simple terms. First of all, there is no doubt that Randi has used his alleged offer – over a period of many years – to generate enormous publicity for himself and his cult of debunkers.

 

Well, I deny having a “cult” going, of course, but I’m very pleased and satisfied that the JREF’s work has resulted in copious news interest. But Dr. Mishlove moved ahead. I’ll handle each point he offered:

 

Second of all, Randi’s offer sets himself up as judge and jury.

 

Au contraire, Dr. Mishlove. It is clearly stated in the rules for the Challenge that there will be neither judge not jury, as a quick glance would have informed you – had you cared to look. We conduct the tests – always with the agreement of the challenger – in such a way that the results are self-evident to all; no assessment is necessary. For example: You can fly by flapping your arms? Okay, let’s see. Lean out this window, ma’am…  Oops…! Next candidate…

 

And next point:

 

And, of course, he [Randi] has not the slightest interest in losing the very game that he has created.

 

Yes, this is true, but we quaver not…

 

A true prize would have an independent panel of neutral judges – and these judges, not Randi, should be in control of prize money, to determine if and when it shall be released. 

 

See above. The results are always – by experimental design – plainly evident. Next…

 

So while James Randi and his cult go around accusing the general public of falling for a wide variety of psychic scams, they themselves are engaged in perpetrating a scam of an equal and opposite sort.

 

Oh, I think not, doctor. As you very well know, the “general public” certainly does “fall for a wide variety of psychic scams,” as you suggest, but there is no deception in the JREF challenge, as anyone can determine by examining our procedures and our assets. It is available to anyone who asks – which you did not care to do before you rushed “The Pigasus Award Ironies” into print. To conclude:

 

The final irony is that they are the very near a mirror image of the phonies they try to expose.

 

As long as they set about exposing the true frauds and schemes in the psychic world, they do the world a service. And, I applaud Randi and his ilk for that. But, in their fanatical zeal, they sometimes endeavor to put a stop to legitimate scientific and academic inquiry. (I know this, first hand, as they attempted to interfere with my own doctoral degree program in parapsychology at the University of California, Berkeley.) When they go this far, as they did with Brenda Dunne, they simply reveal the philosophical and moral emptiness of their position.

 

I am unaware of any interference applied to either Dr. Mishlove’s or Ms. Dunne’s doctoral degree program, and would wish to have details of this affront. I would very much like to have contact information for Dr. Jeffrey Mishlove, so that I might clear up that misunderstanding.  Can anyone supply that information?

Stay tuned…

 

TAM 2014  The general consensus among TAM-goers is that this year’s gathering was the best ever.  We’ll have a summary of the activities for you shortly, delayed only by the fact that I’m on my way to Toronto, Aspen, and Québec in the next few weeks to accompany screenings of our film, “An Honest Liar,” which most of the folks at TAM 2014 saw, and expressed their satisfaction with it. Then, in December, I’ll be touring Australia, as well. So, here’s my message for that continent:

 

G'day Australia! This is James Randi. Remember me? If you haven't already heard, I’m coming to visit you in December, this time travelling to Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney between Dec. 3rd and 7th, exclusively screening our 90-minute film “An Honest Liar” at “An evening with James Randi” on this trip Down Under. It’s full of surprises, and will be followed by a Q-and-A session that you’ll long remember! For more information and/or to purchase tickets, please go to ThinkInc.org I’m looking forward to seeing many of my old friends, and exchanging useful ideas and experiences once more!

 

I’ll be doing my best to keep in touch with Swifters while away.

 

That’s all for now, dear friends…

 

James Randi

 

Author: "astonishing@randi.org (James Randi)" Tags: "Swift"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 01 Aug 2014 12:31

Richard Saunders provides the background, foreground, inside and outside of this year's Million Dollar Challenge test in front of a live audience at TAM 2014.

The Amazing Meeting, the annual gathering of the James Randi Educational Foundation (JREF) in Las Vegas, is amazing for a number of reasons. I, for one, find it amazing that although a whole year goes by from one meeting to the next, once ensconced in the venue, the South Point Casino, one can be forgiven for thinking the last meeting was only the other week. In the six years I have been going to the South Point, it has scarcely changed while I just get a little older.

In 2012 and 2013 it was my pleasure to assist the JREF in organising and staging the preliminary test for the Million Dollar Challenge (MDC) which over the years, has become the grand finale of TAM. In 2014, shortly before heading off to Las Vegas, members of the MDC committee, Banachek, Jamy Ian Swiss and Chip Denman, asked if I would once again come to the aid of the party. With such highly regarded people as these acting on behalf of James Randi, the answer was easy.

The emails started following my way a day or two before my arrival, followed by Skype meetings with Banachek and new to the MDC Krystyn Lambert, a highly respected up and coming magician who works with the likes of Cris Angel.

This year the claimant was one Mr. Fei Wang (pronounced 'Wong'), a Chinese national living and studying in Boston. He had already been tested by "The New England Center for the Advancement of Paranormal Science" with seemingly positive results. This report together with letters of recommendation satisfied the MDC committee that it was worth proceeding with testing this claimant.

Mr. Wang's claim in his words is: "I have some supernatural power that I can send out from right hand and other people can simply feel it in distance about 30cm away."

Mr. Wang claims that he can project or transmit a power, force or energy, hitherto unknown to science, from his right hand into the hand of a receptive subject. The subject will be able to feel this energy as warmth, movement, tingling or other notable sensations in their hand. It is also claimed that this energy (possibly known as "Qigong") can be transmitted through various materials including wood, plastic and metal. It is important to note that this claimed ability still works even if the subject is unaware of the direct actions of Mr. Wang.

On the surface of it, this may appear to be a relatively simple claim to test, but experience has shown us that even simple claims can be quite a task.

I arrived at South Point the day before the first official TAM events. Before long I found myself in the Del Mar Bar (the unofficial TAM hangout spot) working on the formal MDC document that would not only serve as the agreement between the JREF and Mr. Wang, but would also be the step-by-step protocol for the test itself. This document would change many times each day as the committee and Mr. Wang worked together to fine-tune the test.

The first hurdle to overcome was to make sure that the subjects of the test, those who were to be on the receiving end of Mr. Wang's powers, were ultimately unaware when or if Mr. Wang was sending his power. At first the idea was to set an aluminium partition on a table, with a subject on one side and Mr. Wang on the other. There would be two holes in the partition through which the subject could extend their hands, coming to rest inside two boxes. Mr. Wang could then 'work' on either the left or right hand, sending his energy through the box, without the subject knowing. 

Figure 1In our first meeting with Mr. Wang on Thursday,  we realised that he found this arrangement unacceptable as he claimed that the power or energy would travel from his right hand, through the box, into the the left hand of the subject and keep going out the other side into the right box! Banachek, Jamy, Chip, Mr. Wang and I, all walked around the room for sometime with our hands on chins, voicing ideas, arguing the merits of each, going back to the drawing board and so on. Then the idea came up that the screen or partition (by which time was agreed could be made from cardboard) be at an angle so the energy would miss the other hand of the subject as it was being projected. We also toyed for a long time with the idea that Mr. Wang and a ''placebo clamant", ie. someone with no special powers, would approach the subject at the same time, one working on the right hand, the other on the left. These ideas bounced around the room for the next couple of hours as we changed this and that, drew diagrams, and argued the small points.

This all goes to remind us all of how complex and involved these preliminary tests can be, especially when you consider that we are also constructing a live performance for an audience. But the overriding consideration during the whole process was to ensure that Mr. Wang was in agreement and comfortable with what we were suggesting. He, like any other claimant at this stage of the planning, had the right to veto what we put forward. I must say that we found Mr. Wang to be very helpful and polite throughout and was understanding of what we were trying to achieve.

Somewhere along the way the idea developed that we only use the right hand of the subject and that Mr. Wang and our placebo claimant should take it in turns. This met with universal agreement as it eliminated quite a few problems. We also agreed that two ping-pong balls, one white, the other black, placed in paper bag and shaken, would be used to determine at random who would approach the subject first and second. By now we all needed a rest and it was agreed we would meet again the next day when Mr. Wang could start meeting and assessing possible subjects for the test.

I headed back to my room and rewrote the MDC document with the new conditions worked out in our meeting complete with new diagrams.

Friday arrived and TAM was in full swing - hundreds of people from all over the world with many old friends to meet once again. Mr. Wang arrived at the reception desk around 12.45pm and was escorted to the 'Press Room' which we commandeered for the next few hours. Soon Krystyn brought in the first group of possible subjects from the Las Vegas area, all of whom were very keen to help. In the week before TAM, Krystyn went about finding the subjects by placing flyers at yoga studios, Whole Foods, mystic bookstores, psychic reading places, crystal dealers, and even used Craig's List. Mr. Wong had mentioned that people who practice meditation, etc. are more likely to be empaths for his energy, but Mr. Wang was happy to use TAM delegates if needed.

The next three hours were spent with Mr. Wang slowly and methodically testing each subject who placed their right hands inside a cardboard box. We even went to the trouble of blindfolding and placing industrial headphones on the subjects to make sure they and Mr. Wang were comfortable with this extra layer of security. Then Banachek or I and Mr. Wang would ask them if they felt any sensation in their hand when the energy seemed to be transmitted. Some said yes, some said they were not sure, most said no. Mr. Wang had the final say as to whether an individual was deemed acceptable and they were asked to return for the live show. Noticing Mr. Wang's right hand was getting very close to the box, it was agreed that a line be drawn to form a 6cm barrier.

A great deal of time was used to work out just how long Mr. Wang needed to concentrate between each subject in order for him to feel his energy levels were just right. It was during this session that it was decided that he would have exactly one minute to work on each subject which was more time than he said he really needed. We also had to agree on how much time should elapse if we were to use the same subject more than once. Other details included where to put the curtains and who should stand where and do what! I videoed the entire session for the archives with the permission of Mr. Wang.

One of the details that changed during this session was that the subject would face away from the audience instead of at right angles. The stage curtains would also be used to help conceal Mr. Wang and our placebo clamant (Jamy Ian Swiss) from the audience. A copy of the document was emailed to Mr. Wang for his records and comments.

Figure 2Saturday rolled around and once again we found ourselves in the Press Room with another group of possible subjects to be assessed by Mr. Wang. Yet more alterations to the test were made as we learnt more about just what was needed and who we might be using the following night. Krystyn also took this opportunity to find out more about Mr. Wang's background for the benefit of the audience. Like the day before, this session took some hours and more of the protocol was fine tuned. By the end we had only five subjects with whom Mr. Wang was happy from the two days of these pre-tests.

More rewrites followed with me making two new versions of the testing plan document. One version was to cater for the possibility of using our five subjects twice giving us ten tests, the other was a safety in case only three of the subjects turned up on the night in which case we would use them up to three times each giving us a total of nine tests. As it turned out it was good to have a 'plan B'.

Finally Sunday, the day of the preliminary challenge arrived. All the members of the MDC committee were very busy that day with talks or workshops and it was not until late into the afternoon after the last TAM talk (which happened to be mine) that we had access to the main stage to start constructing the testing table, cardboard screen and box and practice moving the curtains. A video camera was also installed at the back of the stage to capture for the record what would be hidden from the audience. Mr. Wang joined us during this time to inspect the setup and go over the final protocols, as did James Randi who took great care to examine the stage.

Delegates may be forgiven if they think they saw a strange flash with a yellow tie tearing up and down the great hall, laptop in hand, as I ran to see to last minute lose ends including finding a printer to make copies of the now many times re-written formal document.

All was ready, however we only had three of the five subjects turn up for the test, so plan B it was. We parked them in the service corridor near the main stage, had Mr. Wang wait in the wings, let the audience in and started the show.

Banachek and Jamy took to the stage to introduce the night. Then Chip came out and covered the stats and calculations. For Mr. Wang to pass, he would need to score at least eight hits out of nine trials. Krystyn gave an overview of Mr Wang and his claim, then I entered the stage last and as it happened really had nothing to say! We then did a demonstration run of the test with Brian Walker taking the part of the subject for the benefit of the audience as they would not be able to see the vital part of the test. Maybe the most important procedure at this point was to have Mr. Wang agree to and sign a copy of the formal document. This made it clear that we were testing his claimed ability under conditions to which he agreed.

Now Banachek, Jamy, Chip and Mr. Wang went to the back of the stage while Krystyn and I stayed near the front. Subject #1 was brought from the corridor and I showed her to the seat in front of the cardboard screen and box. I placed her hand into the box for a few moments so she could get accustomed to her arm being at that angle. Banachek gave the word that Mr. Wang was ready, the curtains were drawn, I helped the subject with the blindfold and headphones and guided her hand once again into the box. Behind the curtains and unseen to the audience, Chip reached into the bag and pulled out one of the ping-pong balls and trial #1 was underway with either Mr. Wang or Jamy approaching the box.

As I stood there on the stage, my mind ticking over the seconds, I looked over to Krystyn and thought, "How come she gets a chair?" The audience, as ever at TAM, showed great respect... you could hear a pin drop.

Banachek announced when the time for session #1 was up and I walked over and told the subject. A few moments later we were ready for session #2.

When session #2 was over I removed the blindfold and headphones from the subject. The curtains opened, Banachek came around from the back of the stage and asked the subject "Did you feel something during the first session?" - The subject answered "Yes". "Did you feel something during the second session?" -"No". Krystyn wrote a "1" on the score board. Now Chip revealed who went first and second. It turned out that in this case it was Jamy who had stepped up first, so this trial was a fail for Mr. Wang.

The subject was thanked and shown off the stage and the next subject sent in from the corridor. The same process followed with resting her hand in the box for a few moments, then the placing on of the blindfold and headphone. Trial #2, session #1 proceeded as normal and at the end Banachek instructed me to remove the blindfold and headphones which was not originally planned but gave our subject a slight rest. Then the gear went back on for the next session.

When the time was up for session #2 I removed the blindfold and headphones. The curtains opened, Banachek came around from the back of the stage and asked the subject "Did you feel something during the first session?" - The subject answered "Yes". "Did you feel something during the second session?" - Also "Yes". We had anticipated this possibility so Banachek then asked "In which session did it feel stronger". The answer, "The second session." Krystyn wrote a "2" on the score board. Now Chip revealed who went first and second. It turned out that in this case it was Mr. Wang who had stepped up first, so the trial again was a fail.

Unfortunately this meant the test overall was considered a fail for Mr. Wang as he needed to score at least eight out of nine to pass on the night. Even though two first up fails was always on the cards, it was still a little disappointing.

In what I consider to be a sign of his sincerity, Mr.Wang was happy to answer questions from the audience. I ducked down to have a word to Randi who wanted us to be sure that Mr. Wang received a warm applause, which is exactly what happened.

As the crowd filed out, some people came up to question details of the test or to get a better idea of why we did this or that. One concern raised was that it should have been me and not Banachek who asked the questions of the subjects after each trial to maintain a double-blind aspect. We took that point into consideration as important should we have progressed to the full blown challenge.

Despite Mr. Wang's confidence in his abilities, choosing the subjects for the test himself, taking part in the planning, and agreeing to the conditions, members of the MDC committee and the TAM audience remained skeptical of his claim. The energy or power or force he believes he possesses was seemingly absent during the preliminary test and also failed on most of the subjects during the pre-tests in the days before. It is a possibility that any reported sensation is more likely to be a psychological effect or simply a consequence of the arm and hand being held out during the process, rather than a mystical, unknown power.

I would like to thank the members of the MDC committee for once again allowing me to take part in the event and especially Mr. Wang who had the courage of his convictions.

----------

RIchard Saunders is a Life Member of Australian Skeptics Inc., Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, author and documentary film maker.

Author: "jrefadmin@randi.org (JREFAdmin)" Tags: "Swift"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 01 Aug 2014 12:31

Richard Saunders provides the background, foreground, inside and outside of this year's Million Dollar Challenge test in front of a live audience at TAM 2014.

The Amazing Meeting, the annual gathering of the James Randi Educational Foundation (JREF) in Las Vegas, is amazing for a number of reasons. I, for one, find it amazing that although a whole year goes by from one meeting to the next, once ensconced in the venue, the South Point Casino, one can be forgiven for thinking the last meeting was only the other week. In the six years I have been going to the South Point, it has scarcely changed while I just get a little older.

In 2012 and 2013 it was my pleasure to assist the JREF in organising and staging the preliminary test for the Million Dollar Challenge (MDC) which over the years, has become the grand finale of TAM. In 2014, shortly before heading off to Las Vegas, members of the MDC committee, Banachek, Jamy Ian Swiss and Chip Denman, asked if I would once again come to the aid of the party. With such highly regarded people as these acting on behalf of James Randi, the answer was easy.

The emails started following my way a day or two before my arrival, followed by Skype meetings with Banachek and new to the MDC Krystyn Lambert, a highly respected up and coming magician who works with the likes of Cris Angel.

This year the claimant was one Mr. Fei Wang (pronounced 'Wong'), a Chinese national living and studying in Boston. He had already been tested by "The New England Center for the Advancement of Paranormal Science" with seemingly positive results. This report together with letters of recommendation satisfied the MDC committee that it was worth proceeding with testing this claimant.

Mr. Wang's claim in his words is: "I have some supernatural power that I can send out from right hand and other people can simply feel it in distance about 30cm away."

Mr. Wang claims that he can project or transmit a power, force or energy, hitherto unknown to science, from his right hand into the hand of a receptive subject. The subject will be able to feel this energy as warmth, movement, tingling or other notable sensations in their hand. It is also claimed that this energy (possibly known as "Qigong") can be transmitted through various materials including wood, plastic and metal. It is important to note that this claimed ability still works even if the subject is unaware of the direct actions of Mr. Wang.

On the surface of it, this may appear to be a relatively simple claim to test, but experience has shown us that even simple claims can be quite a task.

I arrived at South Point the day before the first official TAM events. Before long I found myself in the Del Mar Bar (the unofficial TAM hangout spot) working on the formal MDC document that would not only serve as the agreement between the JREF and Mr. Wang, but would also be the step-by-step protocol for the test itself. This document would change many times each day as the committee and Mr. Wang worked together to fine-tune the test.

The first hurdle to overcome was to make sure that the subjects of the test, those who were to be on the receiving end of Mr. Wang's powers, were ultimately unaware when or if Mr. Wang was sending his power. At first the idea was to set an aluminium partition on a table, with a subject on one side and Mr. Wang on the other. There would be two holes in the partition through which the subject could extend their hands, coming to rest inside two boxes. Mr. Wang could then 'work' on either the left or right hand, sending his energy through the box, without the subject knowing. 

Figure 1In our first meeting with Mr. Wang on Thursday,  we realised that he found this arrangement unacceptable as he claimed that the power or energy would travel from his right hand, through the box, into the the left hand of the subject and keep going out the other side into the right box! Banachek, Jamy, Chip, Mr. Wang and I, all walked around the room for sometime with our hands on chins, voicing ideas, arguing the merits of each, going back to the drawing board and so on. Then the idea came up that the screen or partition (by which time was agreed could be made from cardboard) be at an angle so the energy would miss the other hand of the subject as it was being projected. We also toyed for a long time with the idea that Mr. Wang and a ''placebo clamant", ie. someone with no special powers, would approach the subject at the same time, one working on the right hand, the other on the left. These ideas bounced around the room for the next couple of hours as we changed this and that, drew diagrams, and argued the small points.

This all goes to remind us all of how complex and involved these preliminary tests can be, especially when you consider that we are also constructing a live performance for an audience. But the overriding consideration during the whole process was to ensure that Mr. Wang was in agreement and comfortable with what we were suggesting. He, like any other claimant at this stage of the planning, had the right to veto what we put forward. I must say that we found Mr. Wang to be very helpful and polite throughout and was understanding of what we were trying to achieve.

Somewhere along the way the idea developed that we only use the right hand of the subject and that Mr. Wang and our placebo claimant should take it in turns. This met with universal agreement as it eliminated quite a few problems. We also agreed that two ping-pong balls, one white, the other black, placed in paper bag and shaken, would be used to determine at random who would approach the subject first and second. By now we all needed a rest and it was agreed we would meet again the next day when Mr. Wang could start meeting and assessing possible subjects for the test.

I headed back to my room and rewrote the MDC document with the new conditions worked out in our meeting complete with new diagrams.

Friday arrived and TAM was in full swing - hundreds of people from all over the world with many old friends to meet once again. Mr. Wang arrived at the reception desk around 12.45pm and was escorted to the 'Press Room' which we commandeered for the next few hours. Soon Krystyn brought in the first group of possible subjects from the Las Vegas area, all of whom were very keen to help. In the week before TAM, Krystyn went about finding the subjects by placing flyers at yoga studios, Whole Foods, mystic bookstores, psychic reading places, crystal dealers, and even used Craig's List. Mr. Wong had mentioned that people who practice meditation, etc. are more likely to be empaths for his energy, but Mr. Wang was happy to use TAM delegates if needed.

The next three hours were spent with Mr. Wang slowly and methodically testing each subject who placed their right hands inside a cardboard box. We even went to the trouble of blindfolding and placing industrial headphones on the subjects to make sure they and Mr. Wang were comfortable with this extra layer of security. Then Banachek or I and Mr. Wang would ask them if they felt any sensation in their hand when the energy seemed to be transmitted. Some said yes, some said they were not sure, most said no. Mr. Wang had the final say as to whether an individual was deemed acceptable and they were asked to return for the live show. Noticing Mr. Wang's right hand was getting very close to the box, it was agreed that a line be drawn to form a 6cm barrier.

A great deal of time was used to work out just how long Mr. Wang needed to concentrate between each subject in order for him to feel his energy levels were just right. It was during this session that it was decided that he would have exactly one minute to work on each subject which was more time than he said he really needed. We also had to agree on how much time should elapse if we were to use the same subject more than once. Other details included where to put the curtains and who should stand where and do what! I videoed the entire session for the archives with the permission of Mr. Wang.

One of the details that changed during this session was that the subject would face away from the audience instead of at right angles. The stage curtains would also be used to help conceal Mr. Wang and our placebo clamant (Jamy Ian Swiss) from the audience. A copy of the document was emailed to Mr. Wang for his records and comments.

Figure 2Saturday rolled around and once again we found ourselves in the Press Room with another group of possible subjects to be assessed by Mr. Wang. Yet more alterations to the test were made as we learnt more about just what was needed and who we might be using the following night. Krystyn also took this opportunity to find out more about Mr. Wang's background for the benefit of the audience. Like the day before, this session took some hours and more of the protocol was fine tuned. By the end we had only five subjects with whom Mr. Wang was happy from the two days of these pre-tests.

More rewrites followed with me making two new versions of the testing plan document. One version was to cater for the possibility of using our five subjects twice giving us ten tests, the other was a safety in case only three of the subjects turned up on the night in which case we would use them up to three times each giving us a total of nine tests. As it turned out it was good to have a 'plan B'.

Finally Sunday, the day of the preliminary challenge arrived. All the members of the MDC committee were very busy that day with talks or workshops and it was not until late into the afternoon after the last TAM talk (which happened to be mine) that we had access to the main stage to start constructing the testing table, cardboard screen and box and practice moving the curtains. A video camera was also installed at the back of the stage to capture for the record what would be hidden from the audience. Mr. Wang joined us during this time to inspect the setup and go over the final protocols, as did James Randi who took great care to examine the stage.

Delegates may be forgiven if they think they saw a strange flash with a yellow tie tearing up and down the great hall, laptop in hand, as I ran to see to last minute lose ends including finding a printer to make copies of the now many times re-written formal document.

All was ready, however we only had three of the five subjects turn up for the test, so plan B it was. We parked them in the service corridor near the main stage, had Mr. Wang wait in the wings, let the audience in and started the show.

Banachek and Jamy took to the stage to introduce the night. Then Chip came out and covered the stats and calculations. For Mr. Wang to pass, he would need to score at least eight hits out of nine trials. Krystyn gave an overview of Mr Wang and his claim, then I entered the stage last and as it happened really had nothing to say! We then did a demonstration run of the test with Brian Walker taking the part of the subject for the benefit of the audience as they would not be able to see the vital part of the test. Maybe the most important procedure at this point was to have Mr. Wang agree to and sign a copy of the formal document. This made it clear that we were testing his claimed ability under conditions to which he agreed.

Now Banachek, Jamy, Chip and Mr. Wang went to the back of the stage while Krystyn and I stayed near the front. Subject #1 was brought from the corridor and I showed her to the seat in front of the cardboard screen and box. I placed her hand into the box for a few moments so she could get accustomed to her arm being at that angle. Banachek gave the word that Mr. Wang was ready, the curtains were drawn, I helped the subject with the blindfold and headphones and guided her hand once again into the box. Behind the curtains and unseen to the audience, Chip reached into the bag and pulled out one of the ping-pong balls and trial #1 was underway with either Mr. Wang or Jamy approaching the box.

As I stood there on the stage, my mind ticking over the seconds, I looked over to Krystyn and thought, "How come she gets a chair?" The audience, as ever at TAM, showed great respect... you could hear a pin drop.

Banachek announced when the time for session #1 was up and I walked over and told the subject. A few moments later we were ready for session #2.

When session #2 was over I removed the blindfold and headphones from the subject. The curtains opened, Banachek came around from the back of the stage and asked the subject "Did you feel something during the first session?" - The subject answered "Yes". "Did you feel something during the second session?" -"No". Krystyn wrote a "1" on the score board. Now Chip revealed who went first and second. It turned out that in this case it was Jamy who had stepped up first, so this trial was a fail for Mr. Wang.

The subject was thanked and shown off the stage and the next subject sent in from the corridor. The same process followed with resting her hand in the box for a few moments, then the placing on of the blindfold and headphone. Trial #2, session #1 proceeded as normal and at the end Banachek instructed me to remove the blindfold and headphones which was not originally planned but gave our subject a slight rest. Then the gear went back on for the next session.

When the time was up for session #2 I removed the blindfold and headphones. The curtains opened, Banachek came around from the back of the stage and asked the subject "Did you feel something during the first session?" - The subject answered "Yes". "Did you feel something during the second session?" - Also "Yes". We had anticipated this possibility so Banachek then asked "In which session did it feel stronger". The answer, "The second session." Krystyn wrote a "2" on the score board. Now Chip revealed who went first and second. It turned out that in this case it was Mr. Wang who had stepped up first, so the trial again was a fail.

Unfortunately this meant the test overall was considered a fail for Mr. Wang as he needed to score at least eight out of nine to pass on the night. Even though two first up fails was always on the cards, it was still a little disappointing.

In what I consider to be a sign of his sincerity, Mr.Wang was happy to answer questions from the audience. I ducked down to have a word to Randi who wanted us to be sure that Mr. Wang received a warm applause, which is exactly what happened.

As the crowd filed out, some people came up to question details of the test or to get a better idea of why we did this or that. One concern raised was that it should have been me and not Banachek who asked the questions of the subjects after each trial to maintain a double-blind aspect. We took that point into consideration as important should we have progressed to the full blown challenge.

Despite Mr. Wang's confidence in his abilities, choosing the subjects for the test himself, taking part in the planning, and agreeing to the conditions, members of the MDC committee and the TAM audience remained skeptical of his claim. The energy or power or force he believes he possesses was seemingly absent during the preliminary test and also failed on most of the subjects during the pre-tests in the days before. It is a possibility that any reported sensation is more likely to be a psychological effect or simply a consequence of the arm and hand being held out during the process, rather than a mystical, unknown power.

I would like to thank the members of the MDC committee for once again allowing me to take part in the event and especially Mr. Wang who had the courage of his convictions.

----------

RIchard Saunders is a Life Member of Australian Skeptics Inc., Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, author and documentary film maker.

Author: "jrefadmin@randi.org (JREFAdmin)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 20:06

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine. 

 

Medical marijuana as the new herbalism, part 1: Science versus the politics of weed in New York and beyond (David Gorski)
Marijuana is alleged to have many medical benefits, but the hype goes way beyond the evidence. Dr. Gorski reviews the evidence for its effectiveness in pain and several other medical conditions and explains why he supports legalization but not for medical reasons. Parts 2 and 3 will cover autism and cancer. 

An Egregious Example of Ordering Unnecessary Tests (Harriet Hall)
A healthy 21-year-old man asked for a routine physical and got $3700 worth of lab tests he didn’t need. His insurance paid only $13.09. Gasters are flabbered.

Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine research conference disappoints even NCCAM (Jann Bellamy)
The director of research for the NCCAM expressed her disappointment at the quality of research reported at this conference. Many clinical research projects were not developed from adequate mechanistic studies, and their outcomes were not very informative. Examples demonstrate rebranding, tooth fairy science, and other problems.

The Truth? (Mark Crislip)
Autonomy is a basic principle of medical ethics, but patients can only make autonomous decisions if they are given accurate, truthful information. Even integrative medicine clinics at major institutions provide biased information about alternative medicine that is not just misleading but ethically questionable. Examples are discussed.

One Million Page Views (Paul Ingraham)
Science-Based Medicine’s traffic has passed a milestone and is now competing effectively with many popular websites about not-so-science-based medicine. 

 Did Facebook and PNAS violate human research protections in an unethical experiment? (David Gorski)
Facebook feeds were manipulated without informing customers that they were subjects in an experiment. This was unethical, and it wasn’t even particularly good research.  The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) failed to enforce its own requirements for publishing studies.

Stanislaw Burzynski’s propaganda victory on antineoplastons: The FDA really caves (David Gorski)
The FDA has lifted the restrictions they had placed on clinical trials run by the infamous Dr. Burzynski. They ignored 37 years of his abuse of the clinical trial process and his ethical violations. The FDA decision is an extreme dereliction of its duty to the public.

Why Doctors Order Too Many Tests (Harriet Hall)
Doctors who order unnecessary tests try to justify their actions with excuses that don’t hold up. Too many tests can harm patients in several ways. Patients should insist on understanding why a test is being ordered and what difference the results will make.
 

Beware The P-Value (Steven Novella)
The p-value is commonly misunderstood. It is not a measure of whether the phenomenon being studied is likely to be real; it only measures the probability that the data would demonstrate as much or more of a difference if the treatment had no actual effect. For unlikely phenomena, a significant p-value is even more likely to be misleading; a Bayesian analysis can be helpful in putting alternative medicine research into the context of basic scientific knowledge. 

The Center for Inquiry weighs in on the FDA’s mishandling of Stanislaw Burzynski’s clinical trials (David Gorski)
The Center for Inquiry has sent a hard-hitting letter to legislators protesting the FDA’s action in lifting the clinical hold on Burzynski’s research. They characterize the FDA’s action as “enabling his deceptive, antiscientific, and unethical medical adventurism and profiteering.”

Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: Separating facts from fiction (Scott Gavura)
Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a debilitating but subjective condition attributed to a variety of environmental agents. There is no real evidence that such a condition exists; it is not defined by any objective evidence or laboratory findings. There is no justification for treating these patients with “detoxification” or any other of the therapies being used.

The Buzzy: Revolutionary Acute Pain Management or Simple Distraction… (Clay Jones)
Buzzy is a cute device that looks like a bee and is used to apply cold and vibration to  children’s skin to relieve the pain of blood draws and injections. The proposed mechanism and research are unconvincing, but the device may serve as an effective means of distraction.

 Ketogenic diet does not “beat chemo for almost all cancers” (David Gorski)
Dr. Thomas Seyfried’s claim that low carb, high-fat ketogenic diets “can replace chemo for even the deadliest cancers” has been making the rounds on the Internet. The hypothesis is simplistic and based on misunderstandings of cancer biology; the idea is to starve cancers by decreasing the availability of glucose. It might be helpful for some tumors, but the evidence so far is thin and unconvincing, consisting only of preclinical studies and case reports.      

John Oliver skewers Dr. Oz for his hawking of diet supplements (David Gorski)
The HBO show “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” featured a long segment on Dr. Oz and his recent grilling by a congressional committee over his hyping of diet supplements as “miracle” weight loss solutions. It is both entertaining and informative, covering the regulation of dietary supplements and identifying Senators Hatch and Harkin as tools of the supplement industry.

Acupuncture for Macular Degeneration: Why I Reject the Evidence (Harriet Hall)
The Santa Fe protocol is a poorly defined mixture of techniques from 3 different schools of acupuncture (including ear acupuncture and electrical stimulation) that supposedly improves vision in patients with macular degeneration. The only evidence is a case series from one doctor; he used no controls and no blinding.  These and a number of other design flaws make it impossible to accept his study as evidence. 

Food Fears (Steven Novella)
A new study examines the origin of irrational food fears, and possible remedies. People are getting information from dubious sources that promote an ideological, unscientific approach to food safety and misapply the precautionary principle. The science is complex and people tend to fall for the “natural” fallacy and to have “chemophobia,” so they use shortcuts or heuristics to decide which foods to trust.

NY federal court hands triple loss to anti-vaccination ideology (Jann Bellamy)
In two recent cases, a New York court upheld the right of schools to temporarily exclude unvaccinated children from school during outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. It also upheld the denial of a religious exemption from vaccination, saying the students’ and parents’ constitutional rights had not been violated. Parental objections to vaccines are largely fueled by misinformation from anti-vaccine activists. The law is well-settled: states are not constitutionally required to grant non-medical exemptions at all. 

TCM Hodgepodge (Mark Crislip)
Some recent curiosities of TCM. Fire therapy is said to cure impotence: an alcohol-soaked towel is spread over the genitals and burned. The failure rate on acupuncture board exams is high; and the exams are laughable and fail to address sanitation, anatomy underlying the acupoints, or complications. The Cochrane group keeps suggesting more studies even when it finds no supporting evidence for acupuncture. A recent report analyzed 30 patients who contracted TB from acupuncture.

Vani Hari (a.k.a. The Food Babe): The Jenny McCarthy of food (David Gorski)
The Food Babe is the popular blogger who persuaded Subway to stop using a harmless ingredient in its bread because the same chemical is used in yoga mats. Now she is campaigning against allegedly toxic chemicals and GMO ingredients in beer. She is laughably ignorant about chemistry, and instead of going by scientific evidence she goes by whether she can pronounce the name of a chemical.

Turmeric: Tasty in Curry, Questionable as Medicine (Harriet Hall)
Turmeric is claimed to have medicinal properties and to be as effective as 14 major drugs commonly used for serious medical conditions like diabetes, depression, etc. The hype far exceeds the evidence. Claims are based on preliminary findings from animal and in vitro studies but there are only a handful of preliminary pilot studies in humans, and their results are not impressive.

Surgery Under Hypnosis (Steven Novella)
The BBC recently reported another sensational case of surgery under hypnosis, this time a parathyroid operation in a Guinean singer who allegedly sang throughout surgery to protect her voice. The truth is less sensational: along with hypnosis she had local anesthesia which is sufficient to block all pain sensations by itself.  And it is not plausible that damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve could be avoided by singing.

Dr. Oz and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (Scott Gavura)
Dr. Oz  was recently grilled in a Senate hearing for promoting “miracle”
 weight loss products on his TV show. Senator McCaskill took him to task for saying things he knows are not true, and pointed out that the scientific community is almost monolithic against him.  In his defense, Oz followed his usual M.O.: extrapolating from weak, cherry-picked evidence to make grandiose claims. He did not come off well.

Is There a Role for the Art of Medicine in Science-Based Practice? (Clay Jones)
Medicine is an applied science. The “art” of medicine is often defined as compassion, communication, treating patients as individuals, etc. The “art” of making a diagnosis is really just pattern recognition. The idea that medicine is an art is often taken too far and used as an excuse for all manner of bogus approaches to health care.

 

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 20:06

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine. 

 

Medical marijuana as the new herbalism, part 1: Science versus the politics of weed in New York and beyond (David Gorski)
Marijuana is alleged to have many medical benefits, but the hype goes way beyond the evidence. Dr. Gorski reviews the evidence for its effectiveness in pain and several other medical conditions and explains why he supports legalization but not for medical reasons. Parts 2 and 3 will cover autism and cancer. 

An Egregious Example of Ordering Unnecessary Tests (Harriet Hall)
A healthy 21-year-old man asked for a routine physical and got $3700 worth of lab tests he didn’t need. His insurance paid only $13.09. Gasters are flabbered.

Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine research conference disappoints even NCCAM (Jann Bellamy)
The director of research for the NCCAM expressed her disappointment at the quality of research reported at this conference. Many clinical research projects were not developed from adequate mechanistic studies, and their outcomes were not very informative. Examples demonstrate rebranding, tooth fairy science, and other problems.

The Truth? (Mark Crislip)
Autonomy is a basic principle of medical ethics, but patients can only make autonomous decisions if they are given accurate, truthful information. Even integrative medicine clinics at major institutions provide biased information about alternative medicine that is not just misleading but ethically questionable. Examples are discussed.

One Million Page Views (Paul Ingraham)
Science-Based Medicine’s traffic has passed a milestone and is now competing effectively with many popular websites about not-so-science-based medicine. 

 Did Facebook and PNAS violate human research protections in an unethical experiment? (David Gorski)
Facebook feeds were manipulated without informing customers that they were subjects in an experiment. This was unethical, and it wasn’t even particularly good research.  The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) failed to enforce its own requirements for publishing studies.

Stanislaw Burzynski’s propaganda victory on antineoplastons: The FDA really caves (David Gorski)
The FDA has lifted the restrictions they had placed on clinical trials run by the infamous Dr. Burzynski. They ignored 37 years of his abuse of the clinical trial process and his ethical violations. The FDA decision is an extreme dereliction of its duty to the public.

Why Doctors Order Too Many Tests (Harriet Hall)
Doctors who order unnecessary tests try to justify their actions with excuses that don’t hold up. Too many tests can harm patients in several ways. Patients should insist on understanding why a test is being ordered and what difference the results will make.
 

Beware The P-Value (Steven Novella)
The p-value is commonly misunderstood. It is not a measure of whether the phenomenon being studied is likely to be real; it only measures the probability that the data would demonstrate as much or more of a difference if the treatment had no actual effect. For unlikely phenomena, a significant p-value is even more likely to be misleading; a Bayesian analysis can be helpful in putting alternative medicine research into the context of basic scientific knowledge. 

The Center for Inquiry weighs in on the FDA’s mishandling of Stanislaw Burzynski’s clinical trials (David Gorski)
The Center for Inquiry has sent a hard-hitting letter to legislators protesting the FDA’s action in lifting the clinical hold on Burzynski’s research. They characterize the FDA’s action as “enabling his deceptive, antiscientific, and unethical medical adventurism and profiteering.”

Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: Separating facts from fiction (Scott Gavura)
Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a debilitating but subjective condition attributed to a variety of environmental agents. There is no real evidence that such a condition exists; it is not defined by any objective evidence or laboratory findings. There is no justification for treating these patients with “detoxification” or any other of the therapies being used.

The Buzzy: Revolutionary Acute Pain Management or Simple Distraction… (Clay Jones)
Buzzy is a cute device that looks like a bee and is used to apply cold and vibration to  children’s skin to relieve the pain of blood draws and injections. The proposed mechanism and research are unconvincing, but the device may serve as an effective means of distraction.

 Ketogenic diet does not “beat chemo for almost all cancers” (David Gorski)
Dr. Thomas Seyfried’s claim that low carb, high-fat ketogenic diets “can replace chemo for even the deadliest cancers” has been making the rounds on the Internet. The hypothesis is simplistic and based on misunderstandings of cancer biology; the idea is to starve cancers by decreasing the availability of glucose. It might be helpful for some tumors, but the evidence so far is thin and unconvincing, consisting only of preclinical studies and case reports.      

John Oliver skewers Dr. Oz for his hawking of diet supplements (David Gorski)
The HBO show “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” featured a long segment on Dr. Oz and his recent grilling by a congressional committee over his hyping of diet supplements as “miracle” weight loss solutions. It is both entertaining and informative, covering the regulation of dietary supplements and identifying Senators Hatch and Harkin as tools of the supplement industry.

Acupuncture for Macular Degeneration: Why I Reject the Evidence (Harriet Hall)
The Santa Fe protocol is a poorly defined mixture of techniques from 3 different schools of acupuncture (including ear acupuncture and electrical stimulation) that supposedly improves vision in patients with macular degeneration. The only evidence is a case series from one doctor; he used no controls and no blinding.  These and a number of other design flaws make it impossible to accept his study as evidence. 

Food Fears (Steven Novella)
A new study examines the origin of irrational food fears, and possible remedies. People are getting information from dubious sources that promote an ideological, unscientific approach to food safety and misapply the precautionary principle. The science is complex and people tend to fall for the “natural” fallacy and to have “chemophobia,” so they use shortcuts or heuristics to decide which foods to trust.

NY federal court hands triple loss to anti-vaccination ideology (Jann Bellamy)
In two recent cases, a New York court upheld the right of schools to temporarily exclude unvaccinated children from school during outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. It also upheld the denial of a religious exemption from vaccination, saying the students’ and parents’ constitutional rights had not been violated. Parental objections to vaccines are largely fueled by misinformation from anti-vaccine activists. The law is well-settled: states are not constitutionally required to grant non-medical exemptions at all. 

TCM Hodgepodge (Mark Crislip)
Some recent curiosities of TCM. Fire therapy is said to cure impotence: an alcohol-soaked towel is spread over the genitals and burned. The failure rate on acupuncture board exams is high; and the exams are laughable and fail to address sanitation, anatomy underlying the acupoints, or complications. The Cochrane group keeps suggesting more studies even when it finds no supporting evidence for acupuncture. A recent report analyzed 30 patients who contracted TB from acupuncture.

Vani Hari (a.k.a. The Food Babe): The Jenny McCarthy of food (David Gorski)
The Food Babe is the popular blogger who persuaded Subway to stop using a harmless ingredient in its bread because the same chemical is used in yoga mats. Now she is campaigning against allegedly toxic chemicals and GMO ingredients in beer. She is laughably ignorant about chemistry, and instead of going by scientific evidence she goes by whether she can pronounce the name of a chemical.

Turmeric: Tasty in Curry, Questionable as Medicine (Harriet Hall)
Turmeric is claimed to have medicinal properties and to be as effective as 14 major drugs commonly used for serious medical conditions like diabetes, depression, etc. The hype far exceeds the evidence. Claims are based on preliminary findings from animal and in vitro studies but there are only a handful of preliminary pilot studies in humans, and their results are not impressive.

Surgery Under Hypnosis (Steven Novella)
The BBC recently reported another sensational case of surgery under hypnosis, this time a parathyroid operation in a Guinean singer who allegedly sang throughout surgery to protect her voice. The truth is less sensational: along with hypnosis she had local anesthesia which is sufficient to block all pain sensations by itself.  And it is not plausible that damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve could be avoided by singing.

Dr. Oz and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (Scott Gavura)
Dr. Oz  was recently grilled in a Senate hearing for promoting “miracle”
 weight loss products on his TV show. Senator McCaskill took him to task for saying things he knows are not true, and pointed out that the scientific community is almost monolithic against him.  In his defense, Oz followed his usual M.O.: extrapolating from weak, cherry-picked evidence to make grandiose claims. He did not come off well.

Is There a Role for the Art of Medicine in Science-Based Practice? (Clay Jones)
Medicine is an applied science. The “art” of medicine is often defined as compassion, communication, treating patients as individuals, etc. The “art” of making a diagnosis is really just pattern recognition. The idea that medicine is an art is often taken too far and used as an excuse for all manner of bogus approaches to health care.

 

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Tuesday, 24 Jun 2014 00:52

honestliarA winner!  Yes, “An Honest Liar,” the 90-minute documentary firm labored over and produced by Justin Weinstein and Tyler Measom, had its world premiere in New York City on April 18th, then the Canadian premiere followed in my home town, Toronto. Deyvi and I have been busy ever since “on the road” trying to personally attend as many screenings as we can. The film has already been shown at numerous film festivals all over the world now, and we just received very welcome news. In theannual AFI DOCS, the American Film Institute’s 12th documentary film festival in the Washington, DC, area, this year’s Audience Award for Best Feature went to “An Honest Liar”! We won in a field of well more than one hundred contenders!

AFI DOCS is the only festival in the U.S. dedicated to screenings and events that connect audiences, filmmakers and policy leaders in the seat of our nation’s government. With such excellent judges as Ken Burns, Spike Lee, and Barbara Kopple on the AFI Advisory Board, I personally take this as a resounding endorsement. I’ve never forgotten Spike’s well-known advice: “Do the right thing.” Thank you, man…

Deyvi and I were at first just a bit surprised at the very serious – yet effusive – audience reaction to “An Honest Liar,” but we soon saw that this was going to be the response we should expect. People were teary-eyed yet smiling as they crowded around us, shook our hands and made their comments.  We’re very grateful to Justin and Tyler, as well as to their excellent crew who got it all together and now share our delight.

Thank you, folks, and you can look forward to yet more news on this film. No hints, but we’re only getting started…

James Randi.

Author: "astonishing@randi.org (James Randi)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Tuesday, 24 Jun 2014 00:52

honestliarA winner!  Yes, “An Honest Liar,” the 90-minute documentary firm labored over and produced by Justin Weinstein and Tyler Measom, had its world premiere in New York City on April 18th, then the Canadian premiere followed in my home town, Toronto. Deyvi and I have been busy ever since “on the road” trying to personally attend as many screenings as we can. The film has already been shown at numerous film festivals all over the world now, and we just received very welcome news. In theannual AFI DOCS, the American Film Institute’s 12th documentary film festival in the Washington, DC, area, this year’s Audience Award for Best Feature went to “An Honest Liar”! We won in a field of well more than one hundred contenders!

AFI DOCS is the only festival in the U.S. dedicated to screenings and events that connect audiences, filmmakers and policy leaders in the seat of our nation’s government. With such excellent judges as Ken Burns, Spike Lee, and Barbara Kopple on the AFI Advisory Board, I personally take this as a resounding endorsement. I’ve never forgotten Spike’s well-known advice: “Do the right thing.” Thank you, man…

Deyvi and I were at first just a bit surprised at the very serious – yet effusive – audience reaction to “An Honest Liar,” but we soon saw that this was going to be the response we should expect. People were teary-eyed yet smiling as they crowded around us, shook our hands and made their comments.  We’re very grateful to Justin and Tyler, as well as to their excellent crew who got it all together and now share our delight.

Thank you, folks, and you can look forward to yet more news on this film. No hints, but we’re only getting started…

James Randi.

Author: "astonishing@randi.org (James Randi)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Friday, 20 Jun 2014 22:13

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

 

“Integrative oncology”: The Trojan horse that is quackademic medicine infiltrates ASCO (David Gorski)
At the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago there was a session on Integrative Oncology. The speakers misleadingly claimed that acupuncture and mind-body medicine are evidence-based, and they tried to rebrand things like exercise and nutrition as “integrative” when they actually belong to mainstream medicine. Although they gave lip service to identifying and avoiding quackery, they demonstrated that oncology has been infiltrated by quackademic medicine. 

Macular Degeneration and AREDS 2 Supplements (Harriet Hall)
Diet supplements based on the two AREDS trials are being sold to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness.  There is some evidence that supplements can slow the progression of moderate-to-advanced AMD, but the effect size is small and the studies have not been replicated. There is no evidence that supplements advertised to “promote eye health” can prevent AMD or slow its progression in the early stages, and the possibility that they might cause harm has not been ruled out.

Prolotherapy (Steven Novella)
Prolotherapy is the injection of irritating substances into areas of musculoskeletal pain to provoke a healing response. Preliminary clinical research shows symptomatic improvement but no change in objective outcomes; it is compatible with the hypothesis that there is no specific effect from prolotherapy. Caution is advised pending more definitive research. 

Reiki: Fraudulent Misrepresentation (Jann Bellamy)
The Cleveland Clinic offers reiki and advertises that it provides specific health benefits through its effects on the patient’s “energy.” They provide false information to induce patients to purchase reiki treatmens. If a patient sued them for fraudulent misrepresentation, he should win his case.  

Astrology, Alchemy, ESP and Reiki. One of These Is Not Like The Other (Mark Crislip)
The American public believes in a lot of things that are pure bunkum, from astrology to ESP. Reiki is made-up nonsense with no basis in physical reality and zero quality studies to demonstrate any efficacy beyond placebo effects, yet some 60 hospitals and institutions offer it.  Even if it doesn’t amount to fraud, the institutionalizing of magical therapies outside of Hogwarts is surely unethical.

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 20 Jun 2014 22:13

Here is a recap of the stories that appeared last week at Science-Based Medicine, a multi-author skeptical blog that separates the science from the woo-woo in medicine.

 

“Integrative oncology”: The Trojan horse that is quackademic medicine infiltrates ASCO (David Gorski)
At the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago there was a session on Integrative Oncology. The speakers misleadingly claimed that acupuncture and mind-body medicine are evidence-based, and they tried to rebrand things like exercise and nutrition as “integrative” when they actually belong to mainstream medicine. Although they gave lip service to identifying and avoiding quackery, they demonstrated that oncology has been infiltrated by quackademic medicine. 

Macular Degeneration and AREDS 2 Supplements (Harriet Hall)
Diet supplements based on the two AREDS trials are being sold to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness.  There is some evidence that supplements can slow the progression of moderate-to-advanced AMD, but the effect size is small and the studies have not been replicated. There is no evidence that supplements advertised to “promote eye health” can prevent AMD or slow its progression in the early stages, and the possibility that they might cause harm has not been ruled out.

Prolotherapy (Steven Novella)
Prolotherapy is the injection of irritating substances into areas of musculoskeletal pain to provoke a healing response. Preliminary clinical research shows symptomatic improvement but no change in objective outcomes; it is compatible with the hypothesis that there is no specific effect from prolotherapy. Caution is advised pending more definitive research. 

Reiki: Fraudulent Misrepresentation (Jann Bellamy)
The Cleveland Clinic offers reiki and advertises that it provides specific health benefits through its effects on the patient’s “energy.” They provide false information to induce patients to purchase reiki treatmens. If a patient sued them for fraudulent misrepresentation, he should win his case.  

Astrology, Alchemy, ESP and Reiki. One of These Is Not Like The Other (Mark Crislip)
The American public believes in a lot of things that are pure bunkum, from astrology to ESP. Reiki is made-up nonsense with no basis in physical reality and zero quality studies to demonstrate any efficacy beyond placebo effects, yet some 60 hospitals and institutions offer it.  Even if it doesn’t amount to fraud, the institutionalizing of magical therapies outside of Hogwarts is surely unethical.

Author: "harriet.hall@comcast.net (Harriet Hall)" Tags: "Swift"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 12 Jun 2014 21:22

I enjoy plane trips because these are the only times I get to read for enjoyment. On a recent flight my book of choice was a title by skeptic Steve Cuno and Joanne Hanks. “It’s Not About The Sex” My Ass: Confessions of an ex-Mormon, ex-Polygamist ex-wife tells the fascinating story of Joanne’s personal journey from mainline Mormon, to fundamentalist Mormon, to non-believer. 

This case is interesting in that most fundamentalists are born into these groups, while Joanne and her husband chose to join a polygamist cult. Joanne and her chiropractor husband Jeff were raised as members of the mainstream Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS). They both had family with a polygamist past. Following exposure to Second Coming propaganda, they decided that the end was nigh, and they needed to return to the original church to ensure their salvation. After shopping around for a sect, the couple and their three young children moved to Manti, Utah, and joined James Harmston’s True and Living Church of Jesus Christ of the Last Days (TLC). As per section 132 of the Doctrine and Covenants, Jeff took a “celestial wife” and the family was promptly excommunicated by the LDS. 

 

The book covers many paranormal and pseudoscientific topics that will be of interest to skeptics, including creationism and alleged psychic abilities. The group’s leader claimed to be the reincarnation of Mormon founder Joseph Smith, while his wife was the reincarnation of Smith’s First Wife, Emma. Naturally, his other celestial wives (or women he coveted) were also reincarnated as Smith’s celestial wives. Other members purported to be such luminaries as Mary Magdalene, Queen Elizabeth the First, Josephine Bonaparte, and Isaac Newton. (Unfortunately, an argument once broke out when two different women both claimed to be Marie Antoinette). 

You may have heard of the LDS practice of “baptisms for the dead”. In this ritual, computer-generated lists of names of deceased people are read aloud (such as the names of Holocaust victims), and proxy Mormon baptisms are performed for them to save their souls. The TLC’s version of this was the “prayer session.” Joanne accurately defined these as séances, during which they summoned deceased non-Mormons via a channeler and had a nice chat with them. Then they asked the deceased if they would like to receive a baptism, which they invariably did. They always seemed to channel famous visitors including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Winston Churchill. Amazingly, Martin Luther, Wolfgang Mozart, and Joan of Arc spoke fluent American English during these sessions. 

For years, these strange beliefs and practices stirred skepticism in Joanne, which she shot down with her own rationalizations and the manipulation of the group. However, one incident (or lack of an incident) was too ridiculous to ignore. Harmston, as the group’s prophet, predicted that the Second Coming was going to take place on March 25, 2000. Everyone on earth would die, including mainstream Mormons, but the members of the TLC would be spared. The group planned for a massive celebration, but the day came and went without incident. Jesus was a no-show. How did the prophet explain his failure? Well, he didn’t fail! Jesus did return to earth and fulfilled the prophecy. Mercifully, God folded back time on itself by exactly one day and life carried on as usual…

False prophets and false promises were the final straws for Joanne and Jeff. They left the community and Mormonism altogether. (Jeff’s second wife had already left him and become another plural wife in Harmston’s growing harem of women.) In their search for a new church they eventually became atheists, with a little help from George Carlin and his humorous views on religion. In the end, the whole experience was destructive for the couple and it drove them apart. However, Joanne found a silver lining in her divorce. “At least,” I told Jeff one day, “I don’t have to defend chiropractic any more.” 

Joanne is a highly intelligent and rational woman, demonstrating that, under the right (or wrong) circumstances, we are all susceptible to cults and charismatic leaders. The book is witty and insightful, and the authors make many self-effacing and poignant observations that highlight the hypocrisy and manipulation of cults, and their considerable dangers. 

“It’s Not About the Sex” My Ass is available from Amazon in eBook and paperback formats.

Dr. Karen Stollznow is a linguist, author, skeptical paranormal investigator and a research fellow for the James Randi Foundation. You can follow Karen on Twitter here.

Author: "kstollznow@berkeley.edu (Dr. Karen Stollznow)" Tags: "Swift"
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Date: Thursday, 12 Jun 2014 21:22

I enjoy plane trips because these are the only times I get to read for enjoyment. On a recent flight my book of choice was a title by skeptic Steve Cuno and Joanne Hanks. “It’s Not About The Sex” My Ass: Confessions of an ex-Mormon, ex-Polygamist ex-wife tells the fascinating story of Joanne’s personal journey from mainline Mormon, to fundamentalist Mormon, to non-believer. 

This case is interesting in that most fundamentalists are born into these groups, while Joanne and her husband chose to join a polygamist cult. Joanne and her chiropractor husband Jeff were raised as members of the mainstream Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS). They both had family with a polygamist past. Following exposure to Second Coming propaganda, they decided that the end was nigh, and they needed to return to the original church to ensure their salvation. After shopping around for a sect, the couple and their three young children moved to Manti, Utah, and joined James Harmston’s True and Living Church of Jesus Christ of the Last Days (TLC). As per section 132 of the Doctrine and Covenants, Jeff took a “celestial wife” and the family was promptly excommunicated by the LDS. 

 

The book covers many paranormal and pseudoscientific topics that will be of interest to skeptics, including creationism and alleged psychic abilities. The group’s leader claimed to be the reincarnation of Mormon founder Joseph Smith, while his wife was the reincarnation of Smith’s First Wife, Emma. Naturally, his other celestial wives (or women he coveted) were also reincarnated as Smith’s celestial wives. Other members purported to be such luminaries as Mary Magdalene, Queen Elizabeth the First, Josephine Bonaparte, and Isaac Newton. (Unfortunately, an argument once broke out when two different women both claimed to be Marie Antoinette). 

You may have heard of the LDS practice of “baptisms for the dead”. In this ritual, computer-generated lists of names of deceased people are read aloud (such as the names of Holocaust victims), and proxy Mormon baptisms are performed for them to save their souls. The TLC’s version of this was the “prayer session.” Joanne accurately defined these as séances, during which they summoned deceased non-Mormons via a channeler and had a nice chat with them. Then they asked the deceased if they would like to receive a baptism, which they invariably did. They always seemed to channel famous visitors including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Winston Churchill. Amazingly, Martin Luther, Wolfgang Mozart, and Joan of Arc spoke fluent American English during these sessions. 

For years, these strange beliefs and practices stirred skepticism in Joanne, which she shot down with her own rationalizations and the manipulation of the group. However, one incident (or lack of an incident) was too ridiculous to ignore. Harmston, as the group’s prophet, predicted that the Second Coming was going to take place on March 25, 2000. Everyone on earth would die, including mainstream Mormons, but the members of the TLC would be spared. The group planned for a massive celebration, but the day came and went without incident. Jesus was a no-show. How did the prophet explain his failure? Well, he didn’t fail! Jesus did return to earth and fulfilled the prophecy. Mercifully, God folded back time on itself by exactly one day and life carried on as usual…

False prophets and false promises were the final straws for Joanne and Jeff. They left the community and Mormonism altogether. (Jeff’s second wife had already left him and become another plural wife in Harmston’s growing harem of women.) In their search for a new church they eventually became atheists, with a little help from George Carlin and his humorous views on religion. In the end, the whole experience was destructive for the couple and it drove them apart. However, Joanne found a silver lining in her divorce. “At least,” I told Jeff one day, “I don’t have to defend chiropractic any more.” 

Joanne is a highly intelligent and rational woman, demonstrating that, under the right (or wrong) circumstances, we are all susceptible to cults and charismatic leaders. The book is witty and insightful, and the authors make many self-effacing and poignant observations that highlight the hypocrisy and manipulation of cults, and their considerable dangers. 

“It’s Not About the Sex” My Ass is available from Amazon in eBook and paperback formats.

Dr. Karen Stollznow is a linguist, author, skeptical paranormal investigator and a research fellow for the James Randi Foundation. You can follow Karen on Twitter here.

Author: "kstollznow@berkeley.edu (Dr. Karen Stollznow)" Tags: "Swift"
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