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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 17:28

It happens at most big concerts: at some point, the artist invites someone on stage to sing, or dance, or propose, or something.

Keith Urban was no different when he played this year's Calgary Stampede, and asked a couple to come up and dance as he sang "Better Life."

But what he got was definitely more than anyone expected.

Watch:

Author: "Jennifer Van Evra"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 16:50

Elvis Presley was one of the most engaging, and most controversial, live performers of all time.

But what happens when you remove the music from all that hip shaking?

Check it out:

Related:

David Bowie and Mick Jagger's music-less 'Dancing in the Street' video is outrageous





Author: "Jennifer Van Evra"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 15:49

So far this week, music parody master Weird Al Yankovic has released videos spoofing some of pop's biggest hits, among them Pharrell Williams's "Happy," Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines" and Lorde's "Royals."

Next he's taking on Aussie-born recording artist and model Iggy Azalea, and transformed her hit "Fancy" into a hilarious handyman rap called "Handy."

Got termite problems? An overflowing toilet? Leaky roof? Ungrounded wires?

He's your man — and his backup dancers are pretty impressive, too:

Related:

Watch Weird Al's 'Tacky', the perfect spoof of Pharrell’s 'Happy'

'Everybody shut up': Weird Al Yankovic releases hilarious ‘Blurred Lines’ spoof

Watch Weird Al Yankovic's hilarious spoof of Lorde's megahit 'Royals' 

Author: "Jennifer Van Evra"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 15:10

We don't get the phrase "too much of a good thing." If something is good, wouldn't you want more of it? Well, that's certainly the case when the good thing is Canadian music heroes. If you have one legendary group onstage, wouldn't it be great if they were joined by another iconic act?

Here's Blue Rodeo playing "Hasn't Hit Me Yet" as part of their silver anniversary party at the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto back in 2012. They're joined onstage by Andy Maize and Josh Finlayson, two of the founding members of Skydiggers.

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 15:04

Sports awards shows are all about saluting the fastest, the strongest and the greatest — but last night, Canadian rap star and ESPY Awards host Drake hilariously saluted those who didn't quite make the cut with a song called "Honorable Mention."

"Real talent doesn't win championships, like real music doesn't always win Grammys," Drake sang as a picture of Macklemore (who won all three awards in the rap category at this year's Grammy Awards) appeared on a screen behind him.

"Before this evening I took a long break. I contemplated taking the birthright trip to Israel but I ended up redirecting the jet to the Bahamas. It just made more sense for me," he joked to the sports star-studded crowd. "I stayed there on a pilgrimage to discover my new sound. And it's soulful, and it's meaningful and it's sports-themed. And I want to share that sound with you tonight."

In the song, Drake pokes fun at everyone from Macklemore to LeBron James to Nascar star Danica Patrick to U.S. soccer fans.

Then he performed a whole tune dedicated to sports mistresses, and was joined by R&B star Brian McKnight.

It's worth a watch:

Author: "Jennifer Van Evra"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 14:28

Mary Lambert concerts are already legendary as group therapy with a cash bar, and after spending time with her music, and her story, it's easy to understand why.

"Confessional songwriter" gets a lot of play as a label, but what about the songwriter who's just frank as f--k about everything: delving back into painful memories from the past (Lambert was molested by her father as a kid, gang-raped at 17 and is a former member of the controversial Mars Hill congregation) and an outspoken advocate for her communities, living openly and happily as a lesbian with bipolar disorder championing fat acceptance.

That's a lot of stuff to balance on one set of shoulders, and we haven't even gotten to Lambert's role in Macklemore's smash marriage equality anthem, "Same Love." Yes, that was her gorgeous chorus on which the polarizing rapper hung his verses, ultimately transforming Lambert's life from that of bartender/struggling singer into aspiring pop star in a studio, co-writing with the dude who wrote "Wrecking Ball."

CBC Music spoke with Lambert over the phone in advance of her appearance at the Vancouver Folk Music Festival, July 18-20 at Jericho Park, to discuss the strange ways in which dreams really can come true.

What's been the most surreal moment of the last year?

There are different levels of surreal, it’s not like one outweighs the other. But they’re just — ugh, I don’t know how to say this, but I’m still me, right? When I was bartending and someone from the local radio station came in, I freaked out and that lasted for like an entire day. That was the same exact emotion that I had when I walked onstage for the Grammys. There are equal levels of excitement and there are times when I’m really, really excited to eat a sandwich. [Laughs] It’s the same excitement! I’m always me. But there are moments when I literally look around and I’m like, "This is insane."

I think a big one was when I was on the arena tour with Macklemore and it was a routine every night to hear 10,000 people chant my name and go totally crazy when I came out onstage and sing all my words with me. That’s — that’s unreal! That’s something I dreamed about as a little girl, so those moments are huge, but I also really profoundly enjoy the human connection and being able to meet an individual person rather than seeing 10,000 people as this sort-of entity. I really enjoy the actual singular connection to a person and seeing how my music has become a catalyst for them or helped shape their view of something. That’s so much more tangible than seeing a sea of 10,000 people.

I just did a show and this guy who wasn’t really my demographic, he was in his 30s, and he was literally shaking. He was shaking and crying and he was like, "You are doing something so important," and he showed me his arms and he had the worst scars and the worst cuts that I’d seen, and he was like, "I’m bipolar and the fact that you’re open about talking about it and you’re such a force, it’s such an inspiration." I forget because I’ve always been me, I’ve always been outspoken, but I guess it’s a very new thing for a pop artist to say these things. To me it doesn’t feel like I’m an activist or anything, I’m just being myself, but I understand that there’s a greater impact.

You're something of an icon now in all of these different communities [mental health, LGBTQ, size positive]. Does it feel like a heavy responsibility?

Hmmm ... no. I feel like I have to be really careful about what I say, but I’ve been trying to be really careful for the last six years. That was when I realized we have so much power as individual people based on what we say and what our language is and our thought processes. I’ve been monitoring all of those things for years now and I feel comfortable and confident that I believe I’m a healer first and an artist second, and that is often through the power of communication and language, and hopefully that translates into vulnerability and connection to each other.

Strangers come up to you on the street, don't they, and compliment you on your energy.

People are really nice to me! They’re so nice to me. I feel like I have friends everywhere. There might be a point where it gets — well, it’s a bit hard if you’re having a serious conversation with somebody and then someone wants a picture with you and you’re like, well, I was just talking about a death and I’m really not in this head space to take a photo with you, but generally I have a really good time. It’s so fun, it’s just like I have friends everywhere, I love that!

You'll be coming here for the Vancouver Folk Music Festival. What's the wildest festival you’ve ever played?

I haven't played a lot of festivals, they’ve mostly been pride festivals. I did this festival in Pensacola, Florida, and I don’t drink a ton on tour anymore because I just can’t afford to be hungover and I care too much about my art. I used to drink a ton, I just don’t do that anymore. But I was drinking Fireball [laughs] and it was a lesbian festival, and I wasn’t drinking a ton, but the audience found out that’s what I was drinking so they were telling me to drink a shot onstage and were chanting and I had a f--king great time and it was crazy! I got drunk and then just hung out with all of my fans. And it was on a beach and it was so cool! It was one of my favourite festivals ever, I had so much fun.

Do pride fests have new meaning for you now?

Yes. I used to get really claustrophobic at pride festivals, I didn’t really like them. I liked street festivals or things that weren’t so packed. I have to be really careful. I have a mental disorder and I get really panicky in situations sometimes, so a lot of big crowds and not being able to hear is really difficult for me. So to be on the other side of it is much more enjoyable to be onstage and be doing something that I love, so the festivals take on a new life and a new understanding for me.

You're writing these powerful songs that really resonate and come from such a vulnerable place. Do you have a ritual for writing?

A year ago I would have told you, oh, there has to be silence, it has to be 3 a.m., I have to be drunk or crying, well, not drunk, [laughs] I don’t write all my songs drunk, or tortured and I have to go through something really terrible to write and this year is just totally a 180 from that. On this record that I’m going to be promoting, Heart on My Sleeve, it comes out in October, I wrote in the studio and I wrote all of the singles with writing partners. I wrote with my producer and my executive producer and another producer, MoZella, who wrote “Wrecking Ball.” I was very apprehensive and I was kind of mad, like, "I don’t need any co-writers!" [Laughs]

I was very stubborn and kind of offended, and then I realized that for what I wanted to accomplish, there were these people in this field, in this industry, that understood something about pop music that I didn’t that I wanted to tap into. I wanted to bring my vulnerability and my command of language into a pop setting and we really, really achieved that through this record. I stretched myself and it became this huge moment for me. I can write anywhere now. I don’t have to be tortured, I can be having a great time and still write something awesome. That’s a great feeling as a writer because it means I’m adaptable.

Come hang out with me on Twitter: @_AndreaWarner

Check out CBC Music's 100 best Canadian songs ever.

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 14:16

Blues legend Johnny Winter died on Wednesday at a hotel in Zurich, Switzerland. The finger-picking guitarist's remarkable career included performing, recording and producing, and began in the late 1960s.

Winter was born in the heart of the Mississippi delta then raised in Beaumont, Texas. In 1968 he opened for Mike Bloomfield and caught the attention of Columbia Records, which signed him with a $600,000 advance, reportedly the largest ever received at that time. His fame grew the next year when he performed at Woodstock.

During his long career, the guitarist performed with Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Muddy Waters, a childhood hero whom he would later produce records for. Winter was included on Rolling Stone's list of greatest guitarists and earned multiple Grammy nominations as a performer and producer. 

He died in the midst of a European tour and was scheduled to perform in Ontario and Quebec next week. Winter was to release a new record, Step Back, on Sept. 2.

A statement from Winter's PR company was released saying, his "wife, family and bandmates are all saddened by the loss of one of the world's finest guitarists."

Follow Michael Morreale on Twitter: @18mrm

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Listen to CBC Music's Blues Classics stream

Author: "Michael Morreale"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 12:13

Each day, Rich Terfry and Radio 2 Drive wraps up your day with music and stories about the interesting things going on in the world.

REAR VIEW MIRROR:

 

Every week, Rich Terfry looks back in our Rear-view Mirror at a great song from the good ol’ days. This week, The Byrds with "Turn Turn Turn."

King Solomon, born in 1011 BC, is given, by some, credit for writing a song that went to #1 on the pop charts in 1965.

LISTEN

Listen to Rich tell you about "Turn Turn Turn" by hitting the play button!

When legendary folk singer-songwriter Pete Seeger received a letter from his publisher saying he was having trouble selling the protest songs he was writing, he went to work on a song called "Turn! Turn! Turn!" Seeger took the text from Chapter 3 of the Book of Ecclesiastes in the Bible, did a bit of tinkering and added a melody he came up with in fifteen minutes. When he sent the song to his publisher, his publisher said it was exactly what he was looking for.

Seeger's publisher found buyers for the song quickly. It was first sold to a folk group called The Limeliters. A few months later, Seeger recorded a version of the song himself.

"Turn! Turn! Turn!" became a huge hit a few years later when The Byrds recorded a version. It went to number one on the Billboard chart and stayed there for three weeks.

The meaning of the song can been interpreted in many ways, but most hear it as a plea for world peace. Most performers emphasize the last line of the song: "a time for peace, I swear it's not too late."

Here's one of the very few songs in the history of the pop charts to take all of or most of its lyrics from scripture, and the only one to go to number one. This is "Turn! Turn! Turn!" by The Byrds on Rear View Mirror:

 

Here are some other great editions of Rear-view Mirror:

The Kinks/You Really Got Me

The Beatles/Yesterday

Al Green/Let's Stay Together

Simon and Garfunkel/The Boxer

Smokey Robinson and the Miracles/Tracks of my Tears

Elvis Presley/Heartbreak Hotel

Bruce Cockburn/Lovers In A Dangerous Time

The Doors - Light My Fire

Bob Dylan & Jimi Hendrix/All Along The Watchtower 

The Clash/London Calling

Phil Spector and the Ronnettes/Be My Baby

Os Mutantes/Ando Meio Desligado

The Diamonds/Little Darlin

Captain Beefheart/Yellow Brick Road

Elton John/Bennie and the Jets

Hank Williams/Long Gone Lonesome Blues

R.E.M./What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

Tom Waits/Jockey Full of Bourbon

Neil Diamond/Sweet Caroline

The Who/Pinball Wizard

Buffalo Springfield/For What It's Worth

Five Man Electrical Band/Signs

Band Aid/Do They Know It's Christmas

John Lennon/Imagine

The Ugly Ducklings/Nothin

Bob Dylan/Tangled Up In Blue

The Beatles/Norwegian Wood

The Pursuit of Happiness/I'm An Adult Now

Bruce Springsteen/Born To Run

Arcade Fire/Wake Up

Gnarls Barkley/Crazy

Big Joe Turner/Shake Rattle and Roll

Martha and the Muffins/Echo Beach

Wilson Pickett/In The Midnight Hour

The Band/The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Fleetwood Mac/Go Your Own Way

The Animals/House of the Rising Sun

Ian and Sylvia/Four Strong Winds

James Brown/Please Please Please

John Cougar Mellencamp, 'Pink Houses'

Leonard Cohen/Suzanne

The Ramones/I Wanna Be Sedated

Blue Rodeo/Try

The Guess Who/American Woman

U2/I Still Have't Found What I'm Looking For

Janis Joplin/Me and Bobby McGee

Gordon Lightfoot "If You Could Read My Mind"

The Byrds "Eight Miles High"

Simon and Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence"

Bill Haley and his Comets "Rock Around The Clock"

The Velvet Underground "I'm Waiting For The Man"

Johnny Cash "Folsom Prison Blues"

Bobby Fuller "I Fought The Law"

Big Star "September Gurls"

The Hollies "Bus Stop"

Joy Division "Love Will Tear Us Apart"

Booker T and the MGs "Green Onions"

Jimi Hendrix "Hey Joe"

Neil Young "Rockin' in the Free World"

Dolly Parton "Jolene"

The Left Banke "Walk Away Renee"

Lou Reed "Walk On The Wild Side"

James Taylor "Fire And Rain"

The Clash "Should I Stay or Should I Go"

Marvin Gaye "Sexual Healing"

Radiohead "Paranoid Android"

M.I.A. "Paper Planes"

The Animals "We Gotta Get Out of this Place"

Dusty Springfield "Son of a Preacher Man"

Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put A Spell On You"

Cheap Trick "Surrender"

Mott The Hoople "All the Young Dudes"

Beach Boys "Sloop John B"

Amy Winehouse "Rehab"

New York Dolls "Personality Crisis"

Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

George Jones "He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Bruce Springsteen "Born in the USA"

The Beatles "With A Little Help From My Friends"

Rolling Stones 'Miss You'

The Coasters 'Run Red Run'

Elvis Costello, 'Alison'

James Brown, 'Hot (I Need to be loved loved loved)'

Inner Circle, 'Tenement Yard'

Ray Charles, 'I Don't Need No Doctor'

Curtis Mayfield, 'Freddy's Dead'

Gang Starr, 'Beyond Comprehension'

Bo Diddley, 'Bo Diddley'

Aretha Franklin, 'Rocksteady'

CCR, 'Have You Ever Seen the Rain'

Howlin' Wolf, 'Smokestack Lightning'

Bobby Womack, 'Across 110th Street'

Roy Orbison, 'In Dreams'

Foggy Hogtown Boys, 'Man of Constant Sorrow'

Pink Floyd, 'Wish You Were Here'

Neil Young, 'Cortez The Killer'

Bob Dylan, 'Subterranean Homesick Blues'

Little Eva, 'Loco-Motion'

Elvis Costello, 'Watching the Detectives'

Jimmy Cliff, 'The Harder They Come'

The Verve, 'Bittersweet Symphony'

Roberta Flack, 'Killing Me Softly with his Song'

R.E.M., 'Radio Free Europe'

Radiohead, 'No Surprises'

Led Zeppelin, 'Ramble On'

Rolling Stones, 'Beast of Burden'

Glen Campbell, 'Wichita Lineman'

 

JUNK IN THE TRUNK:

Coco, the corn-loving dog:

Cat has a strange way of entertaining himself:

How to make a hit pop song:

 

RICH'S PICK: "Word Crimes" by Weird Al:

Author: "Alex Redekop"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 11:55

From Newfoundland to P.E.I., Nova Scotia to New Brunswick, and through Quebec and Ontario, the CBC Beetle has knocked off six out of 10 provinces so far in this year's CBC Music Beetle Roadtrip Sessions!

We're driving from coast to coast in a 2014 Volkswagen Beetle and bringing you along with us for the ride — are you following on Twitter and Instagram via #CBCBeetle yet? — as we meet up with some of Canada's best artists to capture unique, live, intimate performances in spectacular locations all along the way.

If you can believe it, the roadtrip has been in full swing for a month and, just before we hit the road again last week to continue our journey from southern Ontario to Victoria and Vancouver, B.C., we released the first five of our sessions, which you can check out below. To see more from behind-the-scenes at these performances, plus some of our best photos from the road, click through the gallery above.

Icebergs, Signal Hill and screeching in: Newfoundland's Green & Gold Beetle Roadtrip Session

Gros Morne National Park's 1,000-foot cliffs backdrop Sherman Downey's Beetle Roadtrip Session


Anne of Green Gables and Paper Lions collide in Beetle Roadtrip Session

Joel Plaskett performs 'Love This Town' while driving around Halifax

New Brunswick proven to actually have tourist attractions by singer-songwriter David Myles

When you're a on a roadtrip, do you stop and check out the sites or do you burn on through? What is your favourite roadtrip tourist attraction? What is a favourite you found by mistake? Chime in on the comments below or tweet us @CBCRadio3 using #CBCBeetle!

And be sure to check in on where the Beetle is heading next on our giant interactive map at cbcmusic.ca/beetleroadtrip.

Author: "Grant Lawrence"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 10:01

A night at the opera once meant donning formal wear and sitting quietly in a glitzy opera house. But several innovative opera companies are performing in non-conventional spaces across Canada this summer, proving that times are changing.

Right now in Banff, a collective of young opera-types from Toronto are asking what Mozart's Don Giovanni would sound like if it was set in modern-day Banff. Against the Grain Theatre is collaborating with the Banff Centre and Canadian Opera Company to rework the libretto and mount the production, called #UncleJohn, at the scenic Cave and Basin National Historic Site.

"It's important to show people that opera can be anything!" wrote the #UncleJohn team in an email. "It is a living, breathing art form that exists in large theatres and also in alternative venues."

Reinventing operas in unconventional spaces is what Against the Grain Theatre does. They say that it forces them to look at every tiny detail of each work with fresh eyes. Meanwhile, a common side effect to working in smaller venues is that audiences are taken closer to the action, making each Against the Grain production an intimate affair. 

"Being small encourages and reminds us to dream big, but maintain the intimacy and uniqueness of what we do."



Open the gallery above for a look at six innovative Canadian companies that are taking opera out of the opera house this summer.



The collaborator's mindset

Running a small and nimble opera company opens the doors to some unusual collaborations that expand the reach of a production, as Vancouver's Astrolabe Musik Theatre and Turning Point Ensemble prove in performances of Barbara Pentland's opera The Lake this August.

The opera company is teaming up with a winery near Kelowna, B.C., to mount the production on the very land in which the libretto is set.

Heather Pawsey is the artistic director of the company. Her concert version of The Lake in 2012 was the first time the Canadian opera was presented since its 1954 debut on CBC Radio. The opera is about the first European settlers in what is now West Kelowna, B.C., and their interactions with First Nations people in the area. The story recalls seeing the famous Ogopogo creature in Lake Okanagan, which is known as the deeply significant Na-ha-a-itk to the syilx/Okanagan people.

Pawsey invited a representative from the Westbank First Nation to attend the 2012 performance and contextualize the story for the audience. In turn, Pawsey was invited to perform the opera on the syilx/Okanagan's land and collaborate on two new works, which now will be presented along with the opera this August.

In the past, she's performed new music at a heritage railway station, a crematorium, a classical Chinese garden and the Vancouver Aquarium. "Many folks have told us that they had come for the venue and stayed for the music, and would attend another opera in the future," Pawsey explains. 

"That's nothing but good news for all of us."

Bringing opera to the people

Attracting opera newbies is a big part of why opera companies are taking their shows on the road this summer. 

For the second season in a row, Calgary Opera is using a festival format normally reserved for pop shows or travelling circuses. This year's Opera in the Village presents Leonard Bernstein's operetta Candide under a big top, while gourmet food trucks, a beer tent and roving circus performers create a relaxing and inviting atmosphere outside.

The company hopes that this casual environment will attract first-time opera-goers who will then be drawn to attend a performance next season.

"Opera is the extreme sport of the performing arts, typically set in grandiose venues with huge sets, elaborate costumes and world-renowned artists," explains Calgary Opera’s Erin Kergen. "By bringing the performance outside, we strip away any pretense of opera being inaccessible, and focus on how moving and provoking the human voice is."

From big city to small town

Opera is typically a big-city affair. Lavish productions wow audiences at Opéra de Montréal or the Canadian Opera Company in Toronto. That's why one freewheeling company is shifting its gears and rolling opera out in small-town Ontario this summer.

The Bicycle Opera Project may well be the world’s most ecological touring opera company. Its members travel from town to town on pedal power, bringing contemporary Canadian opera with them. This year they are presenting excerpts by James Rolfe, Brian Current, Tobin Stokes, Adam Scime and Chris Thornborrow in venues intimate enough that audiences can reach out and touch them, including renovated barns, cafés and small concert halls.

It's a win-win-win situation: it exposes more Canadians to opera, it gives the chance for composers to have their work performed and it helps young singers get started in an industry in which it's notoriously difficult to make a living.

"Starting a career in opera can have a long trajectory and I think young artists are restless to stop training and start doing," explains Bicycle Opera co-founder Larissa Koniuk. “We were looking to create a meaningful artistic project that relied on collaboration and a sense of adventure!"

Open the gallery above for a look at six innovative Canadian companies who are taking opera out of the opera house this summer.

Follow Michael Morreale on Twitter: @18mrm

LISTEN

Listen to Heppner's Opera Gems stream

Author: "Michael Morreale"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 10:00

The internet is awash in nostalgia, and this year has seen articles celebrating everything from the 20th anniversary of Green Day’s Dookie to the 30th anniversary of Prince’s Purple Rain to the 50th anniversary of the Beatles on Ed Sullivan.

I’m here to tell you that nostalgia is a lie. It casts an equalizing glow on our memories, making it hard to differentiate the good from the bad, and causing people to mistake remembering something with liking something. Parts of our musical past are better than others, and there is a high concentration of terrible music turning 15 this year.

The music industry peaked 15 years ago, and the truth is that it was awful. Since 1999, the business has shrunk from a $38 billion industry to less than half that. It's easy to blame file-sharing, but what if the industry's decline was caused by so many bad songs becoming way too popular?

1999 was, without a doubt, the worst year in music. Of course there’s bad music every year, but it doesn’t necessarily become popular. The worst songs from 1999 were, for the most part, the biggest songs, and they’ve somehow stayed popular 15 years later. In fact, I still hear most of these songs while I’m waiting for my prescription to get filled at Shoppers Drug Mart.

Check out the gallery above for 15 surprising facts about the 15 worst songs from 15 years ago. Some were released in 1999, some just became popular in 1999, but all of them have had it too good for too long.

Follow Dave Shumka on Twitter: @daveshumka

Related: The 100 best Canadian songs ever

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Listen to CBC Music's Pop 40 stream

Author: "Dave Shumka"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 09:04

Welcome to In Tune, your weekly classical news feed on CBC Radio 2. Saturdays at noon, Katherine Duncan shares the classical music and musicians people are listening to and talking about, here in Canada and around the world.

This week on a special edition of the show, we bring you some of the latest research on how classical music can affect on your health, mood, exercise routine, education — even your driving habits!

You might have heard that the whole Mozart-makes-you-smarter theory didn't turn out to be true. But according to new research, listening to Vivaldi's Four Seasons just might help improve your attention and memory.

If you're feeling sad, they say you've got the blues. You might also feel like listening to the blues. But it goes further than that. A new study says whether you know it or not, you instinctively connect different kinds of music, with different colours.

If you've got kids starting school this fall, a new study offers another good reason to make sure they get some music along with their reading, writing and arithmetic.

According to research, listening to music can affect your driving. And it's not just hard rock or metal that brings out the Indy 500 wannabe in drivers. Even classical music can have a negative effect.

How's this for a provocative idea: A sex toy to help your singing. Despite the giggle factor, University of Alberta vocal coach David Ley has had great success with it. But don't just take our word for it. Watch as he describes his research.

If your average workday includes juggling Twitter, Facebook and email with your actual projects, you might find it a struggle to focus. A new study says music can help, but not just any music will do. Find out what works best, here.

Feeling anxious, tense and stressed? If you do, you might want to think about joining a choir. New research says, choral singing can reduce anxiety.

And, here's an idea to help kick start your next workout. Instead of pumping up the volume on Pink or Jay-Z, why not try a classical soundtrack. A new study says it could help you exercise longer and harder, without getting tired.

Author: "Katherine Duncan"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 16:09

It's a pretty common complaint among Canadian music fans that, unless you live within a two-hour drive of Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver or maybe Calgary, you're probably not going to be able to see your favourite international band.

Well, good news. Baltimore-based dream-pop act Beach House have heard your cry and are coming to your rescue. Their Northern Invasion tour, which will kick off in September, will feature 14 Canadian dates, plus one in Alaska.

Hopefully other bands will start following their lead.

Sept. 18, Anchorage, Alaska, Bear Tooth
Sept. 21, Victoria, B.C., Sugar Nightclub
Sept. 22, Vancouver, B.C., Venue
Sept. 24, Nelson, B.C., Spiritbar
Sept. 26, Edmonton, Alta., Starlite Room
Sept. 27, Calgary, Alta., Republik
Sept. 28, Saskatoon, Sask., Louis’ Pub
Sept. 30, Winnipeg, Man., Pyramid Cabaret
Oct. 1, Thunder Bay, Ont., Crocks
Oct. 3, Toronto, Ont., Lee’s Palace
Oct. 5, Ottawa, Ont., Bronson Centre
Oct. 7, Montreal, Que., Theatre Plaza
Oct. 9, Quebec, Que., Le Cercle
Oct. 10, Fredericton, N.B., The Playhouse
Oct. 11, Halifax, N.S., The Marquee Club

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 15:23

Now on day three of a promised eight-day video release streak, Weird Al Yankovic has transformed Lorde's megahit "Royals" into a hilarious ode to aluminium foil.

On Monday, Yankovic turned Pharrell Williams's hit "Happy" into "Tacky," and yesterday he transformed Robin Thicke's sexually charged song "Blurred Lines" into hilarious rant about grammar and punctuation called "Word Crimes."

In "Foil," his spoof of "Royals," Yankovic doesn't stop at the handy household item's powers to contain restaurant leftovers and picnic supplies, and to slow mould and bacterial formation — he also reminds of its powers to prevent alien abduction.

It's pretty funny. Watch:

Author: "Jennifer Van Evra"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 13:48

Each day, Rich Terfry and Radio 2 Drive wraps up your day with music and stories about the interesting things going on in the world.

REAR VIEW MIRROR:

 

Every week, Rich Terfry looks back in our Rear-view Mirror at a great song from the good ol’ days. This week, The Byrds with "Turn Turn Turn."

King Solomon, born in 1011 BC, is given, by some, credit for writing a song that went to #1 on the pop charts in 1965.

LISTEN

Listen to Rich tell you about "Turn Turn Turn" by hitting the play button!

When legendary folk singer-songwriter Pete Seeger received a letter from his publisher saying he was having trouble selling the protest songs he was writing, he went to work on a song called "Turn! Turn! Turn!" Seeger took the text from Chapter 3 of the Book of Ecclesiastes in the Bible, did a bit of tinkering and added a melody he came up with in fifteen minutes. When he sent the song to his publisher, his publisher said it was exactly what he was looking for.

Seeger's publisher found buyers for the song quickly. It was first sold to a folk group called The Limeliters. A few months later, Seeger recorded a version of the song himself.

"Turn! Turn! Turn!" became a huge hit a few years later when The Byrds recorded a version. It went to number one on the Billboard chart and stayed there for three weeks.

The meaning of the song can been interpreted in many ways, but most hear it as a plea for world peace. Most performers emphasize the last line of the song: "a time for peace, I swear it's not too late."

Here's one of the very few songs in the history of the pop charts to take all of or most of its lyrics from scripture, and the only one to go to number one. This is "Turn! Turn! Turn!" by The Byrds on Rear View Mirror:

 

Here are some other great editions of Rear-view Mirror:

The Kinks/You Really Got Me

The Beatles/Yesterday

Al Green/Let's Stay Together

Simon and Garfunkel/The Boxer

Smokey Robinson and the Miracles/Tracks of my Tears

Elvis Presley/Heartbreak Hotel

Bruce Cockburn/Lovers In A Dangerous Time

The Doors - Light My Fire

Bob Dylan & Jimi Hendrix/All Along The Watchtower 

The Clash/London Calling

Phil Spector and the Ronnettes/Be My Baby

Os Mutantes/Ando Meio Desligado

The Diamonds/Little Darlin

Captain Beefheart/Yellow Brick Road

Elton John/Bennie and the Jets

Hank Williams/Long Gone Lonesome Blues

R.E.M./What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

Tom Waits/Jockey Full of Bourbon

Neil Diamond/Sweet Caroline

The Who/Pinball Wizard

Buffalo Springfield/For What It's Worth

Five Man Electrical Band/Signs

Band Aid/Do They Know It's Christmas

John Lennon/Imagine

The Ugly Ducklings/Nothin

Bob Dylan/Tangled Up In Blue

The Beatles/Norwegian Wood

The Pursuit of Happiness/I'm An Adult Now

Bruce Springsteen/Born To Run

Arcade Fire/Wake Up

Gnarls Barkley/Crazy

Big Joe Turner/Shake Rattle and Roll

Martha and the Muffins/Echo Beach

Wilson Pickett/In The Midnight Hour

The Band/The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Fleetwood Mac/Go Your Own Way

The Animals/House of the Rising Sun

Ian and Sylvia/Four Strong Winds

James Brown/Please Please Please

John Cougar Mellencamp, 'Pink Houses'

Leonard Cohen/Suzanne

The Ramones/I Wanna Be Sedated

Blue Rodeo/Try

The Guess Who/American Woman

U2/I Still Have't Found What I'm Looking For

Janis Joplin/Me and Bobby McGee

Gordon Lightfoot "If You Could Read My Mind"

The Byrds "Eight Miles High"

Simon and Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence"

Bill Haley and his Comets "Rock Around The Clock"

The Velvet Underground "I'm Waiting For The Man"

Johnny Cash "Folsom Prison Blues"

Bobby Fuller "I Fought The Law"

Big Star "September Gurls"

The Hollies "Bus Stop"

Joy Division "Love Will Tear Us Apart"

Booker T and the MGs "Green Onions"

Jimi Hendrix "Hey Joe"

Neil Young "Rockin' in the Free World"

Dolly Parton "Jolene"

The Left Banke "Walk Away Renee"

Lou Reed "Walk On The Wild Side"

James Taylor "Fire And Rain"

The Clash "Should I Stay or Should I Go"

Marvin Gaye "Sexual Healing"

Radiohead "Paranoid Android"

M.I.A. "Paper Planes"

The Animals "We Gotta Get Out of this Place"

Dusty Springfield "Son of a Preacher Man"

Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put A Spell On You"

Cheap Trick "Surrender"

Mott The Hoople "All the Young Dudes"

Beach Boys "Sloop John B"

Amy Winehouse "Rehab"

New York Dolls "Personality Crisis"

Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

George Jones "He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Bruce Springsteen "Born in the USA"

The Beatles "With A Little Help From My Friends"

Rolling Stones 'Miss You'

The Coasters 'Run Red Run'

Elvis Costello, 'Alison'

James Brown, 'Hot (I Need to be loved loved loved)'

Inner Circle, 'Tenement Yard'

Ray Charles, 'I Don't Need No Doctor'

Curtis Mayfield, 'Freddy's Dead'

Gang Starr, 'Beyond Comprehension'

Bo Diddley, 'Bo Diddley'

Aretha Franklin, 'Rocksteady'

CCR, 'Have You Ever Seen the Rain'

Howlin' Wolf, 'Smokestack Lightning'

Bobby Womack, 'Across 110th Street'

Roy Orbison, 'In Dreams'

Foggy Hogtown Boys, 'Man of Constant Sorrow'

Pink Floyd, 'Wish You Were Here'

Neil Young, 'Cortez The Killer'

Bob Dylan, 'Subterranean Homesick Blues'

Little Eva, 'Loco-Motion'

Elvis Costello, 'Watching the Detectives'

Jimmy Cliff, 'The Harder They Come'

The Verve, 'Bittersweet Symphony'

Roberta Flack, 'Killing Me Softly with his Song'

R.E.M., 'Radio Free Europe'

Radiohead, 'No Surprises'

Led Zeppelin, 'Ramble On'

Rolling Stones, 'Beast of Burden'

Glen Campbell, 'Wichita Lineman'

 

JUNK IN THE TRUNK:

Raccoon vs. bubble wrap:



Babies react to fireworks:

Very cute baby vs. lemon:

 

RICH'S PICK: "Too Old To Cut The Mustard" by Red Foley and Ernest Tubb:

Author: "Mark Wigmore"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 13:00

The Canadian Country Music Association Awards nominees have just been announced, and after a banner year, young favourite Brett Kissel leads the pack with a whopping eight nominations, among them single, album, male artist, video and songwriter of the year.

The 24-year-old released his first album when he was just 12 years old, and at 16 was nominated for the CCMA Awards' Chevy Trucks Rising Star Award. His latest album, Started With a Song, was his first on a major label, and has quickly become one of Canadian country's most popular albums.


Not far behind Kissel are favourites Dean Brody (who won male artist of the year in 2012 and 2013), "Is It Friday Yet" singer Gord Bamford (with five nominations), Bracebridge's Deric Ruttan and St. Catharines' Tim Hicks (four each), and Dallas Smith and Wes Mack (three each).



Newcomer Jess Moskaluke, who landed her first spot on the Billboard Canada Country chart with "Good Lovin'," also garnered three nominations, including female artist, rising star and interactive artist of the year.

The CCMA Fan's Choice Award nominees were also announced, with Bamford, Paul Brandt, Brody, George Canyon and multi-year winner Johnny Reid all making the cut. (Fans can vote here.)

Juno Award-winning singer-songwriter Jann Arden and Gemini-winning CBC-TV host and comedian Rick Mercer are taking on hosting duties for the show, which will air on CBC at 8 p.m. local time on Sunday, Sept. 7, at the end of Country Music Week in Edmonton. Eight top awards will be given out that night, while the others will be announced over three non-televised award ceremonies leading up to the broadcast.

“I’m thrilled to be co-hosting the CCMA Awards with Jann Arden. Jann is one of my favourite people,” stated Mercer in a press release. “Usually when Jann and I get together it involves a helmet or harness, this time it’s country music and cowboy hats — although it’s too soon to rule out helmets.”

For the full list of nominees, go to the CCMA website.

Author: "Jennifer Van Evra"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 12:30

Some friends and I were discussing the term "song of the summer" the other day, trying to determine when the idea of naming a song the definitive warm-weather anthem of the year became a pop cultural phenomenon. We came to the conclusion that it’s newer than we realized. It certainly didn’t happen when we were teenagers around the turn of the millennium, at least not to the same obsessive extent. It’s an internet-era phenomenon.

I’d like to suggest that it’s a phenomenon that’s run its course. In fact, I’d like to suggest that we stop the search for 2014’s song of the summer right now and never discuss the subject again. Naming things "song of the summer" is terrible and needs to stop.

So we’re clear, I don’t hate the idea of declaring something the song of the summer because I hate catchy pop songs or fun or sitting on the subway and fondly remembering the time you called in sick and went to the beach when “California Girls” comes on your iPod. I think all of those things are great. My problem with declaring a tune the song of the summer is that it causes good songs to be played until you hate them, and bad songs to be played until you want to slug a stranger.

Right now, the two major contenders for song of the summer are Kiesza’s “Hideaway” and “Fancy” by Iggy Azalea and Charli XCX. I am really, deeply hoping for “Fancy” to take the title, mostly because I don’t particularly like it as is. “Hideaway,” on the other hand, I like a lot. It makes me want to dance. It reminds me of the late ‘80s and early ‘90s when house music crossed over into the mainstream. It has a great video. I don’t want it to get song-of-the-summer-style played into the ground. I don’t want to hear it from every storefront, out of every passing car, from every cellphone, until I want to scream. I don’t want it to turn into “Get Lucky.” That was last year’s undisputed song of the summer, and when I first heard it, I really liked it. In May, it was totally my jam. By the beginning of October, I couldn’t hear it without wanting to projectile vomit. Dubbing “Get Lucky” the song of the summer ruined it for me, and countless other people, possibly forever.

Let’s not let another great song suffer the fate of “Get Lucky.” We’re all doing different things this summer. We’re all having our own adventures. We don’t need a collective soundtrack. We don’t have a movie of the summer, or a TV show, or a book. We don’t need a song. Pick your own song of the summer. Make your own memories around it. Cherish those. Get stoked and nostalgic when it’s January and feels like summer is never coming again, and your song of the summer comes on your iPod. But don’t make it into some sort of shared phenomena. It’s boring.

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 12:24

Every week, Rich Terfry looks back in our Rear-view Mirror at a great song from the good ol’ days. This week, The Byrds with "Turn Turn Turn."

King Solomon, born in 1011 BC, is given, by some, credit for writing a song that went to #1 on the pop charts in 1965.

LISTEN

Listen to Rich tell you about "Turn Turn Turn" by hitting the play button!

When legendary folk singer-songwriter Pete Seeger received a letter from his publisher saying he was having trouble selling the protest songs he was writing, he went to work on a song called "Turn! Turn! Turn!" Seeger took the text from Chapter 3 of the Book of Ecclesiastes in the Bible, did a bit of tinkering and added a melody he came up with in fifteen minutes. When he sent the song to his publisher, his publisher said it was exactly what he was looking for.

Seeger's publisher found buyers for the song quickly. It was first sold to a folk group called The Limeliters. A few months later, Seeger recorded a version of the song himself.

"Turn! Turn! Turn!" became a huge hit a few years later when The Byrds recorded a version. It went to number one on the Billboard chart and stayed there for three weeks.

The meaning of the song can been interpreted in many ways, but most hear it as a plea for world peace. Most performers emphasize the last line of the song: "a time for peace, I swear it's not too late."

Here's one of the very few songs in the history of the pop charts to take all of or most of its lyrics from scripture, and the only one to go to number one. This is "Turn! Turn! Turn!" by The Byrds on Rear View Mirror:

 

Here are some other great editions of Rear-view Mirror:

The Kinks/You Really Got Me

The Beatles/Yesterday

Al Green/Let's Stay Together

Simon and Garfunkel/The Boxer

Smokey Robinson and the Miracles/Tracks of my Tears

Elvis Presley/Heartbreak Hotel

Bruce Cockburn/Lovers In A Dangerous Time

The Doors - Light My Fire

Bob Dylan & Jimi Hendrix/All Along The Watchtower 

The Clash/London Calling

Phil Spector and the Ronnettes/Be My Baby

Os Mutantes/Ando Meio Desligado

The Diamonds/Little Darlin

Captain Beefheart/Yellow Brick Road

Elton John/Bennie and the Jets

Hank Williams/Long Gone Lonesome Blues

R.E.M./What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

Tom Waits/Jockey Full of Bourbon

Neil Diamond/Sweet Caroline

The Who/Pinball Wizard

Buffalo Springfield/For What It's Worth

Five Man Electrical Band/Signs

Band Aid/Do They Know It's Christmas

John Lennon/Imagine

The Ugly Ducklings/Nothin

Bob Dylan/Tangled Up In Blue

The Beatles/Norwegian Wood

The Pursuit of Happiness/I'm An Adult Now

Bruce Springsteen/Born To Run

Arcade Fire/Wake Up

Gnarls Barkley/Crazy

Big Joe Turner/Shake Rattle and Roll

Martha and the Muffins/Echo Beach

Wilson Pickett/In The Midnight Hour

The Band/The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Fleetwood Mac/Go Your Own Way

The Animals/House of the Rising Sun

Ian and Sylvia/Four Strong Winds

James Brown/Please Please Please

John Cougar Mellencamp, 'Pink Houses'

Leonard Cohen/Suzanne

The Ramones/I Wanna Be Sedated

Blue Rodeo/Try

The Guess Who/American Woman

U2/I Still Have't Found What I'm Looking For

Janis Joplin/Me and Bobby McGee

Gordon Lightfoot "If You Could Read My Mind"

The Byrds "Eight Miles High"

Simon and Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence"

Bill Haley and his Comets "Rock Around The Clock"

The Velvet Underground "I'm Waiting For The Man"

Johnny Cash "Folsom Prison Blues"

Bobby Fuller "I Fought The Law"

Big Star "September Gurls"

The Hollies "Bus Stop"

Joy Division "Love Will Tear Us Apart"

Booker T and the MGs "Green Onions"

Jimi Hendrix "Hey Joe"

Neil Young "Rockin' in the Free World"

Dolly Parton "Jolene"

The Left Banke "Walk Away Renee"

Lou Reed "Walk On The Wild Side"

James Taylor "Fire And Rain"

The Clash "Should I Stay or Should I Go"

Marvin Gaye "Sexual Healing"

Radiohead "Paranoid Android"

M.I.A. "Paper Planes"

The Animals "We Gotta Get Out of this Place"

Dusty Springfield "Son of a Preacher Man"

Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put A Spell On You"

Cheap Trick "Surrender"

Mott The Hoople "All the Young Dudes"

Beach Boys "Sloop John B"

Amy Winehouse "Rehab"

New York Dolls "Personality Crisis"

Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

George Jones "He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Bruce Springsteen "Born in the USA"

The Beatles "With A Little Help From My Friends"

Rolling Stones 'Miss You'

The Coasters 'Run Red Run'

Elvis Costello, 'Alison'

James Brown, 'Hot (I Need to be loved loved loved)'

Inner Circle, 'Tenement Yard'

Ray Charles, 'I Don't Need No Doctor'

Curtis Mayfield, 'Freddy's Dead'

Gang Starr, 'Beyond Comprehension'

Bo Diddley, 'Bo Diddley'

Aretha Franklin, 'Rocksteady'

CCR, 'Have You Ever Seen the Rain'

Howlin' Wolf, 'Smokestack Lightning'

Bobby Womack, 'Across 110th Street'

Roy Orbison, 'In Dreams'

Foggy Hogtown Boys, 'Man of Constant Sorrow'

Pink Floyd, 'Wish You Were Here'

Neil Young, 'Cortez The Killer'

Bob Dylan, 'Subterranean Homesick Blues'

Little Eva, 'Loco-Motion'

Elvis Costello, 'Watching the Detectives'

Jimmy Cliff, 'The Harder They Come'

The Verve, 'Bittersweet Symphony'

Roberta Flack, 'Killing Me Softly with his Song'

R.E.M., 'Radio Free Europe'

Radiohead, 'No Surprises'

Led Zeppelin, 'Ramble On'

Rolling Stones, 'Beast of Burden'

Glen Campbell, 'Wichita Lineman'

Author: "Mark Wigmore"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 10:01

Do you know what $10 million sounds like?

Nikki and Timothy Chooi returned home to Victoria, B.C., earlier this year with two priceless Italian instruments in tow.

The brothers, each in their early 20s, have violins on loan from the Canada Council Musical Instrument Bank. Nikki plays the 1700 Taft Stradivari violin and Timothy selected the 1729 Guarneri del Gesù violin, the same instrument that his older brother had once borrowed. The Cremonese violins are valued at approximately $5 million each.

Back in March, the Chooi brothers teamed up for a performance of Bach's double concerto with Victoria Symphony, before each getting their own slice of the spotlight.


\nNikki and Timothy Chooi, violins
\nTimothy Vernon, conductor
\nVictoria Symphony'}">LISTEN

Bach: Concerto for Two Violins
Nikki and Timothy Chooi
Timothy Vernon, conductor
Victoria Symphony

 

Zigeunerweisen
\nNikki Chooi, violin
\nTimothy Vernon, conductor
\nVictoria Symphony'}">LISTEN

Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen
Nikki Chooi
Timothy Vernon, conductor
Victoria Symphony

 

Tzigane
\nTimothy Chooi, violin
\nTimothy Vernon, conductor
\nVictoria Symphony'}">LISTEN

Ravel: Tzigane
Timothy Chooi
Timothy Vernon, conductor
Victoria Symphony

You can listen to this entire concert, as well as many other performances, on CBC Music's Concerts on Demand.

Follow Michael Morreale on Twitter: @18mrm

LISTEN

Listen to CBC Music's Baroque stream

Author: "Michael Morreale"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 04:49

It's officially heat wave time, and I don't know about you, but when the sun is shining and the sweat is pooling in the small of my back, there is nothing better than stripping down and diving into the first bit of cold water I can find.

But I need a soundtrack to my happy, hot times, so I went in search of some of the most upbeat, uplifting, "upworthy" songs I could find for my fun in the sun. Sweet '60s harmonies, electro-swamp funk, sexy Latin beats, dreamy psych-rock: this playlist, featuring music from all over the world, has you covered.

Click through the gallery above to hear all the songs and check out the phenomenal vintage photos of frolicking beach bods and sandy, summery fun. You can also listen to the playlist in its entirety below.

Come hang out with me on Twitter: @_AndreaWarner

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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