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Date: Saturday, 30 Aug 2014 16:00

Stream the new solo album from Robert Plant, who first stepped into the spotlight 45 years ago as the frontman of Led Zeppelin, and who has maintained his iconic "rock god" status following the group's dissolution with a thriving solo career (including an album of the year Grammy in 2007 for Raising Sand with Alison Krauss). 

Lullaby and... the Ceaseless Roar is his 10th solo album, and features 11 new recordings, nine of which are original songs written with his band, the Sensational Space Shifters, channeling everything from the blues to West African polyrhythms. 

The album is available Sept. 9. Pre-order it on iTunes.

Author: "Jesse Kinos-Goodin"
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Date: Friday, 29 Aug 2014 18:31

You've probably already seen the first video from our upcoming First Play Live session with the New Pornographers, "Dancehall Domine," but we want to give you a behind-the-scenes glimpse of what's to come when the full session is released on Sept. 12.

The band recorded the session to celebrate their excellent new album, Brill Bruisers, performing four new tracks from that record as well as four favourites from the past.

Check out the trailer below and see what the future holds: Carl Newman gets personal, Kathryn Calder talks pummeling the competition and there's even a little nod to Belle & Sebastian.

The New Pornographers' tour dates

Aug. 29: Edmonton, Alta., Sonic Boom Festival
Aug. 30: Halifax, N.S., Sandjam

Sept. 6: Detroit, Mich., Majestic Theatre*
Sept. 7: Toronto, Ont., Riot Fest
Sept. 11-14: Victoria, B.C., Rifflandia
Sept. 20: Columbus, Ohio, The LC Pavilion†

Oct. 3: Vancouver, B.C., The Commodore‡
Oct. 4: Vancouver, B.C., The Commodore§
Oct. 5 & 6: Seattle, Wash., The Showbox§
Oct. 8: Portland, Ore., Crystal Ballroom§
Oct. 9: Boise, Idaho, Knitting Factory§
Oct. 10: Salt Lake City, Utah, The Depot§
Oct. 11: Denver, Colo., Gothic Theatre§
Oct. 13: Phoenix, Ariz., The Crescent Ballroom§
Oct. 14: Tucson, Ariz., Rialto Theatre§
Oct. 15: Pioneertown, Calif., Pappy & Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace§
Oct. 17: Los Angeles, Calif., The Wiltern§
Oct. 18: San Diego, Calif., North Park Theatre§
Oct. 18-19: San Francisco, Calif., Treasure Island Music Festival 

Nov. 4: Nashville, Tenn., Cannery Ballroom§
Nov. 5: Asheville, N.C., Orange Peel§
Nov. 6: Atlanta, Ga., Buckhead Theatre§
Nov. 7: New Orleans, L.A., Civic Theatre§
Nov. 8: Austin, Texas, Fun Fun Fun Fest
Nov. 10: St. Louis, Mo., The Pageant§
Nov. 11: Omaha, Neb., Slowdown§
Nov. 13: Milwaukee, Wis., Pabst Theater§
Nov. 14: Chicago, Ill., Riviera Theatre§
Nov. 15: Cleveland, Ohio, House of Blues§
Nov. 17: New York, N.Y., Hammerstein Ballroom§
Nov. 19: Boston, Mass., House of Blues§
Nov. 20: Philadelphia, Pa., Union Transfer§
Nov. 21 & 22: Washington, D.C., 9:30 Club§
Nov. 23: Carrboro, N.C., Cat’s Cradle§

*with Perfect Pussy, Pity Sex
†with Iron & Wine, Glass Animals
‡with Pickwick, Cool
§with special guest The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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Date: Friday, 29 Aug 2014 12:22

Each day, Rich Terfry and Radio 2 Drive wraps up your day with music and stories about the interesting things going on in the world.

80'S WEEK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Listen all week for great music, stories, and special content from one supercool decade. Don't forget to head to the main page for lists, articles and more.

 

REAR-VIEW MIRROR

Every week, Rich Terfry looks back in our Rear-view Mirror at a great song from the good ol’ days. This week, Bruce Cockburn and "Lovers In A Dangerous Time."


LISTEN

Listen to Rich tell you the story behind "Lovers In A Dangerous Time."


Bruce Cockburn's "Lovers In A Dangerous Time" could be a song about the internet generation, but it was written twenty years before the launch of YouTube.

In the early 80s, Bruce Cockburn was living in Toronto with his young daughter, who was just starting school. One day when she was about five years old, she came home from school and explained that she was shown a pig's lung to demonstrate the dangers of smoking. Both Cockburn and his girlfriend were smokers and he says some very passionate discussion took place around the dinner table that day.

It occurred to Bruce Cockburn that kids his daughter's age were growing up a lot faster than they did when he was her age. It was the age of AIDS, environmental concerns and nuclear tensions and information was being spread faster and more graphically than ever before. The image of his daughter playing with her friends in the school yard while the world was becoming a darker place haunted Cockburn. He wanted to write a song that would send a positive, encouraging message to his daughter and her generation.

In these times - when images and stories of environmental disasters, global warming, school shootings, cyber bullying, civil wars and international conflicts circulate at light speed on the internet - "Lovers In A Dangerous Time" is more relevant and sends a message more essential now than ever.

This song was a top 30 hit in 1984 and now stands as a classic. This is "Lovers In A Dangerous Time" by Bruce Cockburn on Rear View Mirror. 

 

Here are some other great editions of Rear-view Mirror:

The Doors - Light My Fire

Bob Dylan & Jimi Hendrix/All Along The Watchtower 

The Clash/London Calling

Phil Spector and the Ronnettes/Be My Baby

Os Mutantes/Ando Meio Desligado

The Diamonds/Little Darlin

Captain Beefheart/Yellow Brick Road

Elton John/Bennie and the Jets

Hank Williams/Long Gone Lonesome Blues

R.E.M./What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

Tom Waits/Jockey Full of Bourbon

Neil Diamond/Sweet Caroline

The Who/Pinball Wizard

Buffalo Springfield/For What It's Worth

Five Man Electrical Band/Signs

Band Aid/Do They Know It's Christmas

John Lennon/Imagine

The Ugly Ducklings/Nothin

Bob Dylan/Tangled Up In Blue

The Beatles/Norwegian Wood

The Pursuit of Happiness/I'm An Adult Now

Bruce Springsteen/Born To Run

Arcade Fire/Wake Up

Gnarls Barkley/Crazy

Big Joe Turner/Shake Rattle and Roll

Martha and the Muffins/Echo Beach

Wilson Pickett/In The Midnight Hour

The Band/The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Fleetwood Mac/Go Your Own Way

The Animals/House of the Rising Sun

Ian and Sylvia/Four Strong Winds

James Brown/Please Please Please

John Cougar Mellencamp, 'Pink Houses'

Leonard Cohen/Suzanne

The Ramones/I Wanna Be Sedated

Blue Rodeo/Try

The Guess Who/American Woman

U2/I Still Have't Found What I'm Looking For

Janis Joplin/Me and Bobby McGee

Gordon Lightfoot "If You Could Read My Mind"

The Byrds "Eight Miles High"

Simon and Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence"

Bill Haley and his Comets "Rock Around The Clock"

The Velvet Underground "I'm Waiting For The Man"

Johnny Cash "Folsom Prison Blues"

Bobby Fuller "I Fought The Law"

Big Star "September Gurls"

The Hollies "Bus Stop"

Joy Division "Love Will Tear Us Apart"

Booker T and the MGs "Green Onions"

Jimi Hendrix "Hey Joe"

Neil Young "Rockin' in the Free World"

Dolly Parton "Jolene"

The Left Banke "Walk Away Renee"

Lou Reed "Walk On The Wild Side"

James Taylor "Fire And Rain"

The Clash "Should I Stay or Should I Go"

Marvin Gaye "Sexual Healing"

Radiohead "Paranoid Android"

M.I.A. "Paper Planes"

The Animals "We Gotta Get Out of this Place"

Dusty Springfield "Son of a Preacher Man"

Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put A Spell On You"

Cheap Trick "Surrender"

Mott The Hoople "All the Young Dudes"

Beach Boys "Sloop John B"

Amy Winehouse "Rehab"

New York Dolls "Personality Crisis"

Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

George Jones "He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Bruce Springsteen "Born in the USA"

The Beatles "With A Little Help From My Friends"

Rolling Stones 'Miss You'

The Coasters 'Run Red Run'

Elvis Costello, 'Alison'

James Brown, 'Hot (I Need to be loved loved loved)'

Inner Circle, 'Tenement Yard'

Ray Charles, 'I Don't Need No Doctor'

Curtis Mayfield, 'Freddy's Dead'

Gang Starr, 'Beyond Comprehension'

Bo Diddley, 'Bo Diddley'

Aretha Franklin, 'Rocksteady'

CCR, 'Have You Ever Seen the Rain'

Howlin' Wolf, 'Smokestack Lightning'

Bobby Womack, 'Across 110th Street'

Roy Orbison, 'In Dreams'

Foggy Hogtown Boys, 'Man of Constant Sorrow'

Pink Floyd, 'Wish You Were Here'

Neil Young, 'Cortez The Killer'

Bob Dylan, 'Subterranean Homesick Blues'

Little Eva, 'Loco-Motion'

Elvis Costello, 'Watching the Detectives'

Jimmy Cliff, 'The Harder They Come'

The Verve, 'Bittersweet Symphony'

Roberta Flack, 'Killing Me Softly with his Song'

R.E.M., 'Radio Free Europe'

Radiohead, 'No Surprises'

Led Zeppelin, 'Ramble On'

Rolling Stones, 'Beast of Burden'

Glen Campbell, 'Wichita Lineman'

 

JUNK IN THE TRUNK:

33 amazing toy facts: 

How to organize your ducks: 

This dog has ESP: 

 

RICH'S PICK: "The Country Walk" by The Village Soul Choir



Author: "Mark Wigmore"
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Date: Friday, 29 Aug 2014 10:00

Are you a musician enrolled in a Canadian university or college? Make sure to check out Rock Your Campus. It takes two minutes to enter, and you could win $10,000 and a whole lot more. 

Frosh week is starting, and we want to get you in the mood. So here's your student orientation soundtrack as you head out to meet your future best friends.

Iggy Azalea, 'Fancy'

What are the odds you won't hear this track at least seven times this week? And let's face it, you wanna! Love it or hate it, critics have proclaimed "Fancy" the song of the summer. It hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 charts, and has been on the chart for 24 weeks and counting. Also appropriate because we know you're leading a super glam life while making fancy Kraft dinner in your dorm room. 



Magic!, 'Rude'

Even the rudest, biggest frosh week party pooper could end up joining a dance party and singing along with this song. It's so catchy, you don't even realize you're singing it. The inspiration for this track is something we all encounter during school: songwriter and lead vocalist Nasri Atweh says the chorus, "Why you gotta be so rude?," came to him after a relationship went sour. 

Tegan and Sara, 'Closer'

Tegan Quin describes this track as a great make-out song — which, let's face it, is the most fun frosh week activity. If you're single, it's also a great track for dancing alone in your underwear and singing into your hairbrush. 

Allie X, 'Catch'

Earlier this year, Katy Perry tweeted to her 50 million-plus followers that she was "obsessed" with this track. Maybe Perry heard about it from her producer Cirkut, who's worked with Toronto's Allie X and is also a Rock Your Campus judge. While "Closer" is about a relationship that's shiny and new, this one is about catching your breath after a break-up. It's bound to happen. Sigh. 

Kiesza, 'Hideaway'

And now for a lesson in the art of cramming: last summer, Calgary's Kiesza was getting ready to get on a flight when her producer started creating the beat for "Hideaway." She dropped her bags, headed to the studio and said it was "written in an hour and mixed and mastered half an hour after that."

"I pretty much freestyled the lyrics because I had a plane to catch and was pushed for time," Kiesza said. She made that flight, and since then her video's been viewed more than 93 million times. Conclusion: cramming can produce incredible results! 

Bahamas, 'All the Time'

Why would you end up cramming for exams? Only if you assume you have "all the time" in the world. Of course, that's how it feels in the first week of September. And then, before you know it: midterms! 

Arcade Fire, 'Reflektor'

Listen to this track and get a leg-up on Philosophy 101 for that general arts degree. Win Butler is a big philosophy buff and was inspired by the Danish philosopher Kierkegaard when he wrote this song. Sure, Butler doesn't explain Kierkegaard's whole concept in this tune, but you may inherit some of his philosophical leanings by osmosis if you throw this one on repeat come midterms. And if you don't, there's always the good old textbook under the pillow.

Buck 65, 'Super Pretty Naughty'

This is the ultimate party song. It's about snacks, rainbows, sports, magic, cake, dolphins, getting dressed up and getting lucky. What else could you possibly want? It also has a beat that came to Earth from outer space on a laser beam. 

Alvvays, 'Party Police'

This isn't about police breaking up your frosh party, but that awkward relationship phase where one person is trying to keep it going and the other has moved on. Hey, it happens, especially if you're at college and your sweetie lives in another city. Come October, the annual turkey dump is inevitable. 



Grimes, 'Go'

"Go" was originally written for Rihanna, who rejected it, but we'll take it! Grimes called it her "summer jam" — and who doesn't want to extend the summer into the school year? 

Chromeo, 'Jealous'

You're going to meet all kinds of characters in university, and inevitably a couple of "jealous" fools who are "too cool to admit it." Those schmucks are the inspiration for this pop funk track, says Chromeo's Dave 1: "I don’t know why music constantly extols this fictitious macho fantasy persona — we’re all just puny insecure oversize children. And it would be funnier to embrace it." Yes, embrace the persona — but ignore the jealous fools. 

Tokyo Police Club, 'Hot Tonight' 

You bet it's hot tonight: you're making the most of frosh week because summer is ending and who knows what the school year will bring. This track is breezy, fun and carefree — just like the perfect frosh! Lead vocalist David Monks sings, "All I really got is a name and a buck." 

 

LISTEN

Check out CBC Music's TD Summer Jams 

 

Which song is (or was) your Frosh week jam? Let us know in the comments below or tweet us @cbcradio3.

LISTEN

Listen to Alvvays, Tokyo Police Club and Chromeo on CBC Radio 3 with hosts Talia Schlanger, Louise Burns and Lana Gay.

Follow Ann Lang on Twitter: @ann_lang

Are you a musician enrolled in a Canadian university or college? Make sure to check out Rock Your Campus. It takes two minutes to enter, and you could win $10,000 and a whole lot more. 

Author: "Ann Lang"
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Date: Friday, 29 Aug 2014 08:00

Like breathing, sleeping and my grandma, Bryan Adams has just always been a part of my life. Thus, it’s been relatively easy to take the 54-year-old former Vancouverite for granted. But no more. Just as death, insomnia and the value of unconditional love made me appreciate the aforementioned "always," so has the prospect of CBC Music’s ’80s week afforded me the luxury of diving deep into Adams’s expansive back catalogue.

The time has come to salute his measured genius: the specificity of his voice; his Peter Pan-like enthusiasm and belief in himself; the way he attacks his guitar with ferocious dexterity; his easy showmanship and confident self-satisfaction; his ear for catchy, melodic rock that gives the people what they want.  

Adams has been in the music business for more than three decades. And for much of that time, regardless of his massive success and the fact that he was, arguably, the biggest thing to happen to Canadian music in the 1980s, he’s also been the butt of many, many jokes, and someone critics could shrug off as being mainstream.

I wish "mainstream" wasn’t the go-to pejorative for elitists. That’s a lot of culture — yes, culture  — to crap all over. Adams’s music has played a significant role in the evolution of Canadiana and our cultural identity. And not just the “worst” aspects of Canadian culture that are all stereotypes and terrible jokes about inferiority, maple syrup, tacit politeness and snow. If you were alive between 1983 and 1991, and relatively conscious or actively engaged in your life, chances are at least one of Adams’s songs is part of the soundtrack of your life.

Weddings, school dances, break-ups and hookups are the big tent poles here, but consider also the small moments: riding in the front seat for the first time as “Summer of ’69” blares through the tinny speakers of your dad’s dilapidated station wagon; really listening to the words to “Run to You” for the first time and figuring out people cheat; holding hands and ice skating to “(Everything I Do) I Do It For You.”

Is Adams’s music cool in the classic definition? No. But it’s safe and familiar, it’s specific to its time and place, and each chorus a soaring monster that’s pretty much irresistible. The ballads are big and unapologetic, the rock numbers fun and frenzied. The man knows his way around a hit and he deserves a lot more credit than he gets.

In the gallery above, CBC Music takes a walk through Adams’s 30-plus years in the music business, the highs and lows of his career and the messy childhood that provides some interesting context for the singularity of his vision, his love of love songs and his need for privacy. Click play below to listen to the 10 tracks in our Bryan Adams appreciation playlist while you read.

Come hang out with me on Twitter: @_AndreaWarner

LISTEN

Stream CBC Music's '80s channel

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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Date: Friday, 29 Aug 2014 07:42

Once again, there are a ton of great shows happening across the country. Corrosion of Conformity are playing in Vancouver, Arcade Fire are in Toronto and Montreal and April Wine are playing Regina. It's a great time to be alive.

LISTEN

Listen to our Radio 3 stream

Follow Chris Dart on Twitter at: @ChrisDartCOTF

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 22:00

When music news has much larger social implications: powerful, famous women embrace feminism, and feminism wins.

WTF! earns an exclamation point.

Beyoncé

“Feminist: the person who believes in the social, political and economic equality of the sexes.” — Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Beyoncé proudly standing in front of the word FEMINIST, towering and burning brightly behind her, is an iconic image, and it comes courtesy of the VMAs. More than just a gesture, it’s an action. It’s declarative, powerful and purposeful. And it was broadcast into millions of homes around the world and viewed millions of times online.

If you’re one of the naysayers or skeptics, I get it. But it’s been a big/weird/exhausting year for feminists and feminism in pop culture. It’s important that somebody with a giant voice and plenty of cultural capital/celebrity muscle does the heavy lifting.

“Feminist” is a label that serves many masters, and while I personally ascribe to it (and really want this ‘“Feminist Killjoy” necklace), I understand why it’s rejected by a choice number.

There are some people who maintain strict and rigid definitions of who can call themselves feminist. And in some cases, self-identified feminists — particularly those who comment on sites like Jezebel — have participated in perpetuating a singular vision of a populist movement: slut-shaming at will, denying choice and ultimately refusing to acknowledge that circumstances and privilege play significant roles in how feminism evolves.

But when those voices within feminism are echoed by media organizations such as America’s right-wing Fox News — which asked, how can Beyoncé call herself a feminist and not wear any pants? — it’s time to take a step back and consider the ways in which we police women and feminism.

The dominant voice in pop culture has been one of a willful and pervasive patriarchy that’s embedded itself deeply into not just our cultural DNA but also our intellectual and emotional DNA. The most stark evidence of the depth and breadth of this subjugation is the way-too-widely accepted notion that feminists hate men. "I like men, therefore I’m not a feminist." It’s the worst syllogism ever.

A number of famous, powerful women have said that very thing recently. Even Beyoncé has hedged and been somewhat guarded about identifying as feminist in the past, though her recent essay, "Gender Equality is a Myth!," was a great hint at what was to come. Rather than look at her VMA declaration simply as a win for feminism, or evidence that the Feminist Mafia finally wore her down, consider instead that Beyoncé’s VMA performance was exactly the catalyst needed for the mainstream to reclaim “feminist.”

Beyoncé’s statement is necessary for the women and girls who grew up being told feminist = man-hater. Feminism should be for everybody — it certainly has the potential to benefit everybody — but it’s particularly critical for every woman who’s been asked, “Well, what were you wearing? What did you say? Were you asking for it?” Feminism is imperative for all the women who breathed sighs of relief at the advent of special nail polish that will alert them to the presence of a date rape drug; for the fact that the nail polish invention is even necessary in 2014. For women who will have to fight twice as hard to be heard and taken seriously as their opposite sex counterparts, while also negotiating an entirely different set of rules of conduct when it comes to behaviour and expectation: don’t be too bossy, don’t dress too sexily, don’t be too confident.

And for those who will immediately counter with, “How can she claim feminism and then segue immediately into the song lyric, ‘Bow down bitches,’” or “How can she claim to be a feminist and then dance half naked with a group of half-naked backup dancers?,” well, I don’t think feminist = man-hater and I sure don’t think feminist = saint. I don’t think feminist means devoid of humour, sexuality, personality, humanity or complexity. I just think feminist is my favourite F-word, and I’m pretty excited to see Beyoncé bring her sizable megaphone and star power to the party.

Feminist news, part 2

Taylor Swift is also talking about her feminism and how she’s come around to seeing that feminism isn’t about hating men. Finally.

“As a teenager, I didn’t understand that saying you’re a feminist is just saying that you hope women and men will have equal rights and equal opportunities. What it seemed to me, the way it was phrased in culture, society, was that you hate men…. Becoming friends with Lena [Dunham] — without her preaching to me, but just seeing why she believes what she believes, why she says what she says, why she stands for what she stands for — has made me realize that I’ve been taking a feminist stance without actually saying so.”

Excellent. Let’s clarify: if you reject feminism or the label "feminist" purely because you think feminism is about hating men, it’s time to get your read on and start thinking critically about how it's come to this.

 

Come hang out with me on Twitter: @_AndreaWarner

Related:

Beyoncé, Jay-Z and why celebrity divorce gossip is strange, sad and human

Meghan Trainor's messed-up hit song 'All About the Bass' is not a self-acceptance anthem

Gene Simmons defends 'private' racism

Stop slut-shaming Nicki Minaj

Tim McGraw slaps a female fan and Justin Bieber loves his Calvin Kleins

Paris Hilton's new music video is a pile of glitter vomit

Taylor Swift writes an essay and the world reacts, Justin Bieber pleads no contest, Robin Thicke bottoms out

Nicki Minaj vs. Iggy Azalea, Justin Bieber's man-baby act, Robin Thicke's publicity stunt fail 

Robin Thicke’s newest low, Lana Del Rey’s death wish, Frances Bean Cobain gets angry

When we laugh at rap covers, what's the joke?

Katy Perry's offensive stage shows, Jena Malone's racist song title and Robin Thicke's questionable intentions

Justin Bieber's racism, Pharrell Williams's headdress, slut-shaming Rihanna and Lana Del Rey's feminism issue





Author: "Andrea Warner"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 21:47

Some people think we may have reached peak festival, but Chicago rap legend Common would disagree. His new hip-hop festival, AHHH! Fest, will take place next month in Chicago. In addition to Common, it will feature performances by De La Soul, Jay Electronica, Lupe Fiasco and Lil Herb. The event will be hosted by comedian Dave Chappelle. It will also feature a community stage featuring up-and-coming acts, which will be curated by rapper Rhymefest.

AHHH! Fest will take place on Sept. 21, if anyone is up for a road trip.

LISTEN

Listen to CBC's Hip-Hop stream

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 20:45

I like to joke that Chad VanGaalen is my favourite wizard, but perhaps Consequence of Sound's review of his latest album, Shrink Dust, put it best: "It’s like if Dali and Kafka got lost at an MGMT concert."

To best illustrate the creative and complex world VanGaalen reveals to his fans, watch the video for "Monster," which he directed and animated.

 

If you missed Chad VanGaalen's performance at the 2014 CBC Music Fest, you can watch it here.

Author: "Lana Gay"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 17:42

On Saturday, June 14, we brought the second annual CBCMusic.ca Festival to Burnaby, B.C. As part of the event, we asked fans to record various songs throughout the festival, and then upload their videos to help us build an interactive, fan-shot video with our partner, WeShot.

The third interactive video is now up on our special microsite (note: designed for use on desktop only).

Watch this unique video of Tegan and Sara's "I'm Not Your Hero" here.

The interactive video lets you switch between camera angles to view it from the point of view of the audience who was there to capture it live.

On mobile? You can check out an edited version of the WeShot video below:

Media not computed.

Watch the CBC Music Festival special on Friday, Sept. 5 on CBC-TV at 9 p.m. local time in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba and B.C., and 8 p.m. local time in Atlantic Canada, Saskatchewan and Alberta.

Author: "CBC Music"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 15:56

Last week, we dug into the archives of Radio 2's The Strombo Show and pulled out this amazing recording of Stars covering Cyndi Lauper's "Time After Time." It turns out that The Strombo Show is a gold mine andall types of magic happen in the converted maintenance closet that is its home.

For '80s week, we decided to bust out some more footage of a modern band playing an '80s classic, so here are Arkells covering "Rock the Casbah."

LISTEN

Listen to CBC Music's '80s Channel

Check out CBC Music throughout the week for more stories like these:

The 50 best Canadian songs of the ’80s

Canadian indie rockers and their ’80s musical matchups

Canadian '80s music was better than you remember

The 20 best music videos of the '80s

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 15:23

Click to vote on the chart!

LISTEN

Nana aba Duncan counts down the best 20 singles on Radio 2.

This week, three new entries: Arkells stay in the game with "11:11," the Wilderness of Manitoba enter with "Leave Someone" and Elliott BROOD's "Jigsaw Heart" gets the most votes. Also this week, former frontman for Led Zeppelin Robert Plant says he might be calling it quits and Bahamas reveals he has a country and western alter ego named "Tex Message".

Scroll down to see who's at number one.

Here are the new adds to the chart:

Arkells, "11:11."

The Wilderness of Manitoba, "Leave Someone."

Elliott BROOD, "Jigsaw Heart."

LISTEN

Listen to Elliott Brood's "Jigsaw Heart"

The chart

1. Adam Cohen, "We Go Home" (same, third week in a row!)

2. Hey Rosetta!, "Kintsukuroi" (up three)

3. Ryan Adams, "Gimme Something Good" (up one)


4. The Black Keys, "Gotta Get Away" (up four)

5. Bastille, "Flaws" (up one)


6. Elliott BROOD, "Jigsaw Heart" (new entry)

7. Bahamas, "Stronger Than That" (down five)

8. Spoon, "Do You" (up two)

9. First Aid Kit, "Waitress Song" (up five)


10. Robert Plant, "Rainbow" (up one)

11. James, "Moving On" (up nine)


12. New Pornographers, "Brill Bruisers" (down five)

13. The Strumbellas, "End of an Era" (down one)

14. Reuben and the Dark, "Devil's Time" (down five)

15. Arkells, "11:11" (new entry)


16. The Wilderness of Manitoba, "Leave Someone" (new entry)


17. Ndidi O, "How Long" (up one)

18. Beck, "Heart is a Drum" (down two)

19. Frazey Ford, "September Fields" (same)

20. Boy & Bear, "Three-Headed Woman" (down five)

Tune in to Radio 2 Friday to hear the show at 7 p.m. (7:30 NT) and Sunday at 5 p.m. (5:30 NT). Follow us @CBCR2Top20 or email radio2top20@cbc.ca.

Author: "Nana aba Duncan"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 13:53

CBC Music Backstage Pass returns to the national airwaves on Sept 5th 2014. We've got a brand new look, a new show format and a brand new face. Talia Schlanger is the new host of Backstage Pass. She also helms CBC radio 2 weekend mornings and is a passionate music lover. On Sept 5th Talia joins the BSP team to spear head the new show format that will spend more time focussed on telling the stories of a single Canadian musician, band or music event. 

What can you expect in season two of Canada's most talked about late-night music show? Backstage Pass will continue to bring you you the biggest and brightest names in Canadian music including Tegan & Sara, Gord Downey, Ron Sexsmith, Blue Rodeo, Emily Haines and Chantal Kreviazuk. Backstage Pass will also bring you the stories of rising names like Reuben And The Dark, Rich Kidd, Raz Fresco, Paper Lions and Born Ruffians.

Tune in every Friday night at midnight and Sundays at 4pm on CBC Television for your all-access ticket to the world of Canadian music. And watch and share new episodes here at cbcmusic.ca/backstagepass.

Connect with the music you love!

Author: "CBC Music"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 12:49

Each day, Rich Terfry and Radio 2 Drive wraps up your day with music and stories about the interesting things going on in the world.

 

80'S WEEK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Listen all week for great music, stories, and special content from one supercool decade. Don't forget to head to the main page for lists, articles and more.

 

REAR-VIEW MIRROR: 80'S WEEK EDITION

Every week, Rich Terfry looks back in our Rear-view Mirror at a great song from the good ol’ days. This week, Bruce Springsteen and "Born in the U.S.A."

In 1984, Bruce Springsteen released what is arguably the most misinterpreted song in pop music history.

"Born In The U.S.A." was written as a scathing indictment of America's treatment of it's war veterans and as a lament for waning national pride. The images portrayed in the verses are bleak.

LISTEN

Listen to Rich tell you the story behind "Born in the USA"

"Down in the shadow of the penitentiary/Out by the gas fires of the refinery/I'm 10 years burning down the road/nowhere to run, ain't got nowhere to go"

Those images are followed by the song's iconic, anthemic chorus. At the top his lungs, Springsteen shouts, "Born In The U.S.A." over thundering drums and an uplifting piano melody that sounds like it was played with a sledgehammer. It's a desperate cry of frustration and sadness.

The song's hook was so powerful, it blinded some listeners to the song's true meaning. It was misinterpreted as a patriotic rallying cry by many, including thepresident of the United States, Ronald Reagan. 1984 was an election year and Reagan wanted to use the song as his campaign anthem. When the president claimed to be a big-time Springsteen fan, the media jumped all over him. Johnny Carson famously said, "If you believe that, I've got a couple of tickets to the Mondale-Ferraro inaugural ball I'd like to sell you," referring to Walter Mondale, who was running against Reagan. Springsteen himself accused the president of not paying attention and turned down his request for an endorsement and for use of the song.

Reagan may have missed Springsteen's point entirely, but in the grand scheme of things, it was a minor misstep. He eventually defeated Mondale in a landslide. Springsteen was a winner too. The song was a top 10 hit propelling the Born In The USA album to 15 times platinum sales status in the U.S. alone.

Incidentally, the album also won a Juno award here in Canada for International Album of the Year.

It's the presidential campaign anthem that wasn't -- "Born In The U.S.A." by Bruce Springsteen.

 

Here are some other great editions of Rear-view Mirror:

Stan Getz & Astrud Gilberto/The Girl From Ipanema

Norman Greenbaum/Spirit in the Sky

Elvis Presley/Blue Suede Shoes

Johnny Cash/Ring of Fire

The Kinks/You Really Got Me

The Beatles/Yesterday

Al Green/Let's Stay Together

Simon and Garfunkel/The Boxer

Smokey Robinson and the Miracles/Tracks of my Tears

Elvis Presley/Heartbreak Hotel

Bruce Cockburn/Lovers In A Dangerous Time

The Doors - Light My Fire

Bob Dylan & Jimi Hendrix/All Along The Watchtower 

The Clash/London Calling

Phil Spector and the Ronnettes/Be My Baby

Os Mutantes/Ando Meio Desligado

The Diamonds/Little Darlin

Captain Beefheart/Yellow Brick Road

Elton John/Bennie and the Jets

Hank Williams/Long Gone Lonesome Blues

R.E.M./What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

Tom Waits/Jockey Full of Bourbon

Neil Diamond/Sweet Caroline

The Who/Pinball Wizard

Buffalo Springfield/For What It's Worth

Five Man Electrical Band/Signs

Band Aid/Do They Know It's Christmas

John Lennon/Imagine

The Ugly Ducklings/Nothin

Bob Dylan/Tangled Up In Blue

The Beatles/Norwegian Wood

The Pursuit of Happiness/I'm An Adult Now

Bruce Springsteen/Born To Run

Arcade Fire/Wake Up

Gnarls Barkley/Crazy

Big Joe Turner/Shake Rattle and Roll

Martha and the Muffins/Echo Beach

Wilson Pickett/In The Midnight Hour

The Band/The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Fleetwood Mac/Go Your Own Way

The Animals/House of the Rising Sun

Ian and Sylvia/Four Strong Winds

James Brown/Please Please Please

John Cougar Mellencamp, 'Pink Houses'

Leonard Cohen/Suzanne

The Ramones/I Wanna Be Sedated

Blue Rodeo/Try

The Guess Who/American Woman

U2/I Still Have't Found What I'm Looking For

Janis Joplin/Me and Bobby McGee

Gordon Lightfoot "If You Could Read My Mind"

The Byrds "Eight Miles High"

Simon and Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence"

Bill Haley and his Comets "Rock Around The Clock"

The Velvet Underground "I'm Waiting For The Man"

Johnny Cash "Folsom Prison Blues"

Bobby Fuller "I Fought The Law"

Big Star "September Gurls"

The Hollies "Bus Stop"

Joy Division "Love Will Tear Us Apart"

Booker T and the MGs "Green Onions"

Jimi Hendrix "Hey Joe"

Neil Young "Rockin' in the Free World"

Dolly Parton "Jolene"

The Left Banke "Walk Away Renee"

Lou Reed "Walk On The Wild Side"

James Taylor "Fire And Rain"

The Clash "Should I Stay or Should I Go"

Marvin Gaye "Sexual Healing"

Radiohead "Paranoid Android"

M.I.A. "Paper Planes"

The Animals "We Gotta Get Out of this Place"

Dusty Springfield "Son of a Preacher Man"

Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put A Spell On You"

Cheap Trick "Surrender"

Mott The Hoople "All the Young Dudes"

Beach Boys "Sloop John B"

Amy Winehouse "Rehab"

New York Dolls "Personality Crisis"

Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

George Jones "He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Bruce Springsteen "Born in the USA"

The Beatles "With A Little Help From My Friends"

Rolling Stones 'Miss You'

The Coasters 'Run Red Run'

Elvis Costello, 'Alison'

James Brown, 'Hot (I Need to be loved loved loved)'

Inner Circle, 'Tenement Yard'

Ray Charles, 'I Don't Need No Doctor'

Curtis Mayfield, 'Freddy's Dead'

Gang Starr, 'Beyond Comprehension'

Bo Diddley, 'Bo Diddley'

Aretha Franklin, 'Rocksteady'

CCR, 'Have You Ever Seen the Rain'

Howlin' Wolf, 'Smokestack Lightning'

Bobby Womack, 'Across 110th Street'

Roy Orbison, 'In Dreams'

Foggy Hogtown Boys, 'Man of Constant Sorrow'

Pink Floyd, 'Wish You Were Here'

Neil Young, 'Cortez The Killer'

Bob Dylan, 'Subterranean Homesick Blues'

Little Eva, 'Loco-Motion'

Elvis Costello, 'Watching the Detectives'

Jimmy Cliff, 'The Harder They Come'

The Verve, 'Bittersweet Symphony'

Roberta Flack, 'Killing Me Softly with his Song'

R.E.M., 'Radio Free Europe'

Radiohead, 'No Surprises'

Led Zeppelin, 'Ramble On'

Rolling Stones, 'Beast of Burden'

Glen Campbell, 'Wichita Lineman'

 

JUNK IN THE TRUNK:

How to make friends at the airport: 

Kid and her dad make a hit song together: 

The kid with the butterfly nose: 

 

RICH'S PICK: "Dollar in the Teeth" by The Upsetters: 

Author: "Mark Wigmore"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 10:44

Slash is, without a doubt, one of the most iconic musical figures of the 1980s, both visually and in terms of his ability to create incredibly memorable guitar riffs.

Next month, he'll be returning to his '80s haunt the Sunset Strip to play at its three most legendary venues, the Troubadour, the Roxy and the Whisky a Go-Go, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Los Angeles’s Guitar Center.

So in celebration of ‘80s week, we talked to the legendary guitarist about his first concert, his time on the Strip in the '80s and how he manages to get excited about performing. 

What was the first concert you remember seeing?

Well, I went to a lot of concerts with my parents when I was a kid, so I mean, I couldn’t even tell you.  But the first one that I went to of my own volition, when I was a teenager, was a two-day festival in L.A. at the Coliseum and it was called the World Music Festival. So it was like at the tail end of all those big American festivals, like California Jam and before, the US Festival. It was a big, two-day event with Aerosmith and Van Halen headlining one day and Ted Nugent and Cheap Trick the other.

Was that when you decided you wanted to be a musician, or had you figured it out before then?  

It was around the same time that all that was happening. I think this was 1978 or ’79, so I was 13 or 14. And I’d been to a lot of concerts, but I hadn’t been to a festival before. I went with this chick from school, and it was just wild to be in the midst of that many people, seeing bands from noon or something to, ‘til the last band got done at midnight…. It was just an experience.  

Tell me a little bit about sort of all those Sunset Strip venues you played coming up. What do they mean to you? Why are you going back to them for your album release?

Those three venues have stayed the same all throughout, which is one of the nice things about it…. There’s a lotta venues that aren’t there anymore in L.A., but these three have been around ever since I was a kid. I went to see a lot of artists, you know, as a kid at these same venues, and then when I started being in bands and I actually played there. They’re  just a big part of my personal music history, which is why we wanted to go and do these gigs when the album comes out. It’s sort of an homage to these places for being as longstanding as they’ve been.

The Troubadour has been one of the main venues in Los Angeles where a lot of people were discovered. In the ‘70s, [it] was one of the main venues for all the singer-songwriters that were coming along, and then in the ‘80s where a lot of the heavy metal bands, including Guns N’ Roses, would play. The Roxy was just one of the more elite clubs in L.A. where a lot of great, even as small as it is, a lot of really great artists came through and played the Roxy. It was where a lot of the cool people would go and whatever. And then the Whisky, to me, the Whisky was always like the most punk rock of the three, you know. I mean the Doors started there, it’s got a great history, too. I saw Motley Crew there, back when they, before Too Fast for Love was coming out. So, yeah, it’s just all iconic venue.

You’ve been doing this professionally now for 30-ish years. How do you still get up for performing? How do you still get stoked for it? 

The performance part of it is what I live for. I mean, that’s just, it’s sort of like my lifeblood, you know? That just comes from a real simple passion that I’ve had ever since I started. And that’s never really changed, it’s probably even gotten more so as I keep doing it. The rest of it is just the stuff that you have to deal with in order to be able to get up onstage and do 45 minutes or two hours or whatever your set time is gonna be. 

LISTEN

Listen to CBC Music's Top 50 songs of the '80s

Check out CBC Music throughout the week for more stories like these:

The 50 best Canadian songs of the ’80s

Canadian indie rockers and their ’80s musical matchups

Canadian '80s music was better than you remember

The 20 best music videos of the '80s

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Thursday, 28 Aug 2014 06:58

It wouldn't be '80s week without a fashion retrospective of the best, craziest, most accessorized dare-to-wear styles of the gaudiest decade in the last 50 years.

It began with the death of disco and ended with the birth of grunge, but along the way the world enjoyed pit stops in baggy sweaters, boxy suits, shoulder pads, pleather vests and leather jackets, lace gloves and sky-high hairdos.

You could spend time checking out this Wiki How on how to indulge in your favourite '80s trend, or you could take your cues (and trigger your own fashion flashback) from the musicians in the gallery above. Get all the looks and listen to some of these musicians' best songs, including selections from Madonna, Rush, Corey Hart, Blondie, Celine Dion, Tina Turner, Bryan Adams, Boy George and more.

Come hang out with me on Twitter: @_AndreaWarner

LISTEN

Stream CBC Music's '80s channel

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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Date: Wednesday, 27 Aug 2014 12:53

Each day, Rich Terfry and Radio 2 Drive wraps up your day with music and stories about the interesting things going on in the world.

 

80'S WEEK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Listen all week for great music, stories, and special content from one supercool decade. Don't forget to head to the main page for lists, articles and more.

 

REAR-VIEW MIRROR: 80'S WEEK EDITION

Every week, Rich Terfry looks back in our Rear-view Mirror at a great song from the good ol’ days. This week, Bruce Springsteen and "Born in the U.S.A."

In 1984, Bruce Springsteen released what is arguably the most misinterpreted song in pop music history.

"Born In The U.S.A." was written as a scathing indictment of America's treatment of it's war veterans and as a lament for waning national pride. The images portrayed in the verses are bleak.

LISTEN

Listen to Rich tell you the story behind "Born in the USA"

"Down in the shadow of the penitentiary/Out by the gas fires of the refinery/I'm 10 years burning down the road/nowhere to run, ain't got nowhere to go"

Those images are followed by the song's iconic, anthemic chorus. At the top his lungs, Springsteen shouts, "Born In The U.S.A." over thundering drums and an uplifting piano melody that sounds like it was played with a sledgehammer. It's a desperate cry of frustration and sadness.

The song's hook was so powerful, it blinded some listeners to the song's true meaning. It was misinterpreted as a patriotic rallying cry by many, including thepresident of the United States, Ronald Reagan. 1984 was an election year and Reagan wanted to use the song as his campaign anthem. When the president claimed to be a big-time Springsteen fan, the media jumped all over him. Johnny Carson famously said, "If you believe that, I've got a couple of tickets to the Mondale-Ferraro inaugural ball I'd like to sell you," referring to Walter Mondale, who was running against Reagan. Springsteen himself accused the president of not paying attention and turned down his request for an endorsement and for use of the song.

Reagan may have missed Springsteen's point entirely, but in the grand scheme of things, it was a minor misstep. He eventually defeated Mondale in a landslide. Springsteen was a winner too. The song was a top 10 hit propelling the Born In The USA album to 15 times platinum sales status in the U.S. alone.

Incidentally, the album also won a Juno award here in Canada for International Album of the Year.

It's the presidential campaign anthem that wasn't -- "Born In The U.S.A." by Bruce Springsteen.

 

Here are some other great editions of Rear-view Mirror:

Stan Getz & Astrud Gilberto/The Girl From Ipanema

Norman Greenbaum/Spirit in the Sky

Elvis Presley/Blue Suede Shoes

Johnny Cash/Ring of Fire

The Kinks/You Really Got Me

The Beatles/Yesterday

Al Green/Let's Stay Together

Simon and Garfunkel/The Boxer

Smokey Robinson and the Miracles/Tracks of my Tears

Elvis Presley/Heartbreak Hotel

Bruce Cockburn/Lovers In A Dangerous Time

The Doors - Light My Fire

Bob Dylan & Jimi Hendrix/All Along The Watchtower 

The Clash/London Calling

Phil Spector and the Ronnettes/Be My Baby

Os Mutantes/Ando Meio Desligado

The Diamonds/Little Darlin

Captain Beefheart/Yellow Brick Road

Elton John/Bennie and the Jets

Hank Williams/Long Gone Lonesome Blues

R.E.M./What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

Tom Waits/Jockey Full of Bourbon

Neil Diamond/Sweet Caroline

The Who/Pinball Wizard

Buffalo Springfield/For What It's Worth

Five Man Electrical Band/Signs

Band Aid/Do They Know It's Christmas

John Lennon/Imagine

The Ugly Ducklings/Nothin

Bob Dylan/Tangled Up In Blue

The Beatles/Norwegian Wood

The Pursuit of Happiness/I'm An Adult Now

Bruce Springsteen/Born To Run

Arcade Fire/Wake Up

Gnarls Barkley/Crazy

Big Joe Turner/Shake Rattle and Roll

Martha and the Muffins/Echo Beach

Wilson Pickett/In The Midnight Hour

The Band/The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Fleetwood Mac/Go Your Own Way

The Animals/House of the Rising Sun

Ian and Sylvia/Four Strong Winds

James Brown/Please Please Please

John Cougar Mellencamp, 'Pink Houses'

Leonard Cohen/Suzanne

The Ramones/I Wanna Be Sedated

Blue Rodeo/Try

The Guess Who/American Woman

U2/I Still Have't Found What I'm Looking For

Janis Joplin/Me and Bobby McGee

Gordon Lightfoot "If You Could Read My Mind"

The Byrds "Eight Miles High"

Simon and Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence"

Bill Haley and his Comets "Rock Around The Clock"

The Velvet Underground "I'm Waiting For The Man"

Johnny Cash "Folsom Prison Blues"

Bobby Fuller "I Fought The Law"

Big Star "September Gurls"

The Hollies "Bus Stop"

Joy Division "Love Will Tear Us Apart"

Booker T and the MGs "Green Onions"

Jimi Hendrix "Hey Joe"

Neil Young "Rockin' in the Free World"

Dolly Parton "Jolene"

The Left Banke "Walk Away Renee"

Lou Reed "Walk On The Wild Side"

James Taylor "Fire And Rain"

The Clash "Should I Stay or Should I Go"

Marvin Gaye "Sexual Healing"

Radiohead "Paranoid Android"

M.I.A. "Paper Planes"

The Animals "We Gotta Get Out of this Place"

Dusty Springfield "Son of a Preacher Man"

Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put A Spell On You"

Cheap Trick "Surrender"

Mott The Hoople "All the Young Dudes"

Beach Boys "Sloop John B"

Amy Winehouse "Rehab"

New York Dolls "Personality Crisis"

Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

George Jones "He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Bruce Springsteen "Born in the USA"

The Beatles "With A Little Help From My Friends"

Rolling Stones 'Miss You'

The Coasters 'Run Red Run'

Elvis Costello, 'Alison'

James Brown, 'Hot (I Need to be loved loved loved)'

Inner Circle, 'Tenement Yard'

Ray Charles, 'I Don't Need No Doctor'

Curtis Mayfield, 'Freddy's Dead'

Gang Starr, 'Beyond Comprehension'

Bo Diddley, 'Bo Diddley'

Aretha Franklin, 'Rocksteady'

CCR, 'Have You Ever Seen the Rain'

Howlin' Wolf, 'Smokestack Lightning'

Bobby Womack, 'Across 110th Street'

Roy Orbison, 'In Dreams'

Foggy Hogtown Boys, 'Man of Constant Sorrow'

Pink Floyd, 'Wish You Were Here'

Neil Young, 'Cortez The Killer'

Bob Dylan, 'Subterranean Homesick Blues'

Little Eva, 'Loco-Motion'

Elvis Costello, 'Watching the Detectives'

Jimmy Cliff, 'The Harder They Come'

The Verve, 'Bittersweet Symphony'

Roberta Flack, 'Killing Me Softly with his Song'

R.E.M., 'Radio Free Europe'

Radiohead, 'No Surprises'

Led Zeppelin, 'Ramble On'

Rolling Stones, 'Beast of Burden'

Glen Campbell, 'Wichita Lineman'

 

JUNK IN THE TRUNK:

The wrong way to make popcorn: 

AC/DC goes bluegrass: 

Dog hates the drums: 

 

RICH'S PICK: "Your Lovin' Man" by Vernon Taylor: 

Author: "Mark Wigmore"
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Date: Wednesday, 27 Aug 2014 10:00

You chose to major in poli-sci, sociology, history or some other social science because you had no idea what to choose, it sounded responsible and why not?

Well here's why not: because hello, you're a musician! In the spirit of Rock Your Campus — which you can enter now — we've compiled nine reasons why you should actually major in music.

1. You can't remember which classes you registered for, but you can already name all of these stickers in the campus radio station. 

(Phil Leitch via Flickr)

2. You live, eat and breathe music. But you majored in philosophy because you find it so stimulating. 

 (Source: Gonçalo Henrique Vieira Pinto

3. You think your economics professor should give you extra credit for writing a song called "Supply and Demand."

4. You never cared to follow rules in the science lab — until someone wrote a rap about it.

(Source: YouTube

5. You can't remember anyone's name from frosh week — but you know their favourite artists. 

(Source: hesitan-t.tumblr.com

6. You enter the library. Cue impromptu dance party. 

(Source: YouTube)

7. People think you're a compulsive pen clicker — but you're really just working out the beat for a new song. 

(Source: YouTube

8. Your roommate wants to kill you.

(Source: imgur

9. You're not bothered when people ask, "What do you plan to do for money?" whenever you mention your major.

(Source: Glee Wiki)

Are you a musician? If you're in college or university, make sure to enter Rock Your Campus. It doesn't matter what you're majoring in — just make sure to enter before Sept. 14, 2014. You could win $10,000 and a lot more.

Can you make a career out of music? Do you think it's a good career choice? Let us know in the comments below or tweet us @cbcradio3.

Follow Ann Lang on Twitter: @ann_lang


Author: "Ann Lang"
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Date: Wednesday, 27 Aug 2014 08:29

It's '80s week here at CBC Music, and we're taking a look back at everyone's favourite decade in music — OK, maybe not everyone's. We put together this gallery for the Canadian music nerds who lived through it.

Although, come to think of it, music nerds didn't really exist at the time. Nerds hadn't yet been celebrated. They were still building computer babes, starting global thermonuclear war and getting their revenge.

If you were obsessed with music in the '80s, take a trip down memory lane in the gallery above.

Do you remember high-speed dubbing music on cassette tapes? Let us know in the comments below or tweet us @cbcradio3.

LISTEN

Listen to hosts Talia Schlanger, Grant Lawrence and Lana Gay talk about '80s music nerds on CBC Radio 3.

Follow Dave Shumka on Twitter: @daveshumka

LISTEN

Listen to CBC Music's Top 50 Canadian songs beginning at noon EST on Aug. 25 & 29, 4:00 EST on Sep. 1 & 5 and again at noon EST on Sep. 8 & 12. 

Check out CBC Music throughout the week for more stories like these:

The 50 best Canadian songs of the ’80s

Canadian indie rockers and their ’80s musical matchups

Canadian '80s music was better than you remember

The 20 best music videos of the '80s

Author: "Dave Shumka"
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Date: Wednesday, 27 Aug 2014 07:33

When you think about spoken word interludes in music, you may think of the sultry breakdowns in the middle of Boyz II Men songs in the '90s. Well, a decade earlier, artists were using spoken parts to varying degrees of success. Sometimes they used them to introduce a song, sometimes they put little skits in the middle of the song, sometimes they got Vincent Price to read a spooky script. It was a crazy time.

We've compiled some of the most memorable '80s moments that aren't quite singing and aren't quite rapping. Check them out in the supercut below.

Follow Dave Shumka on Twitter: @daveshumka

LISTEN

Listen to CBC Music's Top 50 Canadian songs beginning at noon EST on Aug. 25 & 29, 4:00 EST on Sep. 1 & 5 and again at noon EST on Sep. 8 & 12. 

Check out CBC Music throughout the week for more stories like these:

The 50 best Canadian songs of the ’80s

Canadian indie rockers and their ’80s musical matchups

Canadian '80s music was better than you remember

The 20 best music videos of the '80s

Author: "Dave Shumka"
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