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Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 12:31

Each day, Rich Terfry and Radio 2 Drive wraps up your day with music and stories about the interesting things going on in the world.

 

RICH'S PICK: "If" by Telly Savalas:

 

JUNK IN THE TRUNK:

Hall and Oates on a bad night: 


Meet Jiff, the fastest dog on two legs: 


The prime suspect in the case of the missing donut: 


 

REAR VIEW MIRROR:

Every week, Rich Terfry looks back in our Rear-view Mirror at a great song from the good ol’ days. This week, Elvis Presley with "Blue Suede Shoes."



When you think of the rock and roll classic, "Blue Suede Shoes", Elvis Presley probably comes to mind first. If you're a big fan of early rock and roll, you may know Carl Perkinswrote the song and recorded it first. You may also know Eddie Cochran and Buddy Hollyrecorded versions. But what you may not know is that the song originated with the one and only Johnny Cash.

LISTEN

Listen to Rich tell you the incredible story behind Elvis Presley's "Blue Suede Shoes."

In the fall of 1955, Carl Perkins was on tour in the U.S. with Elvis and Johnny Cash. One night, Johnny Cash told Perkins a story about a man with whom he served in the military. He referred to his regulation uniform footwear as his "blue suede shoes", even though they were made of black leather. Cash thought that had a nice ring to it and suggested Perkins use it for a song.

Perkins first thought was, "how the heck am I going to write a song about shoes?!" But a few weeks later, Perkins was playing a dance when he noticed a young couple dancing near the stage. He heard the young man say to his girlfriend, "uh-uh, don't step on my suedes!". That sealed the deal.

Later that night, Perkins woke up at 3 a.m. with the idea for the song in his head. He scrambled to find a piece of paper but wasn't able. All he was able to find was a potato sack, so he wrote the song on that. Funny enough, Perkins couldn't figure out how to spell the word 'suede'. He spelled it "S-W-A-D-E".



Shortly after recording the song, Perkins was on his way to appear on the Perry Como to perform it. He would have been the first rock singer to appear on national television. But he was involved in a serious car accident on the way. Perkins was badly hurt and his brother, who was traveling with him, was killed. Perkins never fully recovered from the accident - physically or emotionally. Elvis Presley, a former label mate of Perkins at Sun Records, decided to record a version of the song as a tribute to his friend and to help him out financially.

Here's the rock and roll classic that was a hit for Carl Perkins and helped make Elvis a star, the seeds of which were planted by Johnny Cash - this is "Blue Suede Shoes" on Rear View Mirror. 

 

Here are some other great editions of Rear-view Mirror:

Johnny Cash/Ring of Fire

The Kinks/You Really Got Me

The Beatles/Yesterday

Al Green/Let's Stay Together

Simon and Garfunkel/The Boxer

Smokey Robinson and the Miracles/Tracks of my Tears

Elvis Presley/Heartbreak Hotel

Bruce Cockburn/Lovers In A Dangerous Time

The Doors - Light My Fire

Bob Dylan & Jimi Hendrix/All Along The Watchtower 

The Clash/London Calling

Phil Spector and the Ronnettes/Be My Baby

Os Mutantes/Ando Meio Desligado

The Diamonds/Little Darlin

Captain Beefheart/Yellow Brick Road

Elton John/Bennie and the Jets

Hank Williams/Long Gone Lonesome Blues

R.E.M./What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

Tom Waits/Jockey Full of Bourbon

Neil Diamond/Sweet Caroline

The Who/Pinball Wizard

Buffalo Springfield/For What It's Worth

Five Man Electrical Band/Signs

Band Aid/Do They Know It's Christmas

John Lennon/Imagine

The Ugly Ducklings/Nothin

Bob Dylan/Tangled Up In Blue

The Beatles/Norwegian Wood

The Pursuit of Happiness/I'm An Adult Now

Bruce Springsteen/Born To Run

Arcade Fire/Wake Up

Gnarls Barkley/Crazy

Big Joe Turner/Shake Rattle and Roll

Martha and the Muffins/Echo Beach

Wilson Pickett/In The Midnight Hour

The Band/The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Fleetwood Mac/Go Your Own Way

The Animals/House of the Rising Sun

Ian and Sylvia/Four Strong Winds

James Brown/Please Please Please

John Cougar Mellencamp, 'Pink Houses'

Leonard Cohen/Suzanne

The Ramones/I Wanna Be Sedated

Blue Rodeo/Try

The Guess Who/American Woman

U2/I Still Have't Found What I'm Looking For

Janis Joplin/Me and Bobby McGee

Gordon Lightfoot "If You Could Read My Mind"

The Byrds "Eight Miles High"

Simon and Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence"

Bill Haley and his Comets "Rock Around The Clock"

The Velvet Underground "I'm Waiting For The Man"

Johnny Cash "Folsom Prison Blues"

Bobby Fuller "I Fought The Law"

Big Star "September Gurls"

The Hollies "Bus Stop"

Joy Division "Love Will Tear Us Apart"

Booker T and the MGs "Green Onions"

Jimi Hendrix "Hey Joe"

Neil Young "Rockin' in the Free World"

Dolly Parton "Jolene"

The Left Banke "Walk Away Renee"

Lou Reed "Walk On The Wild Side"

James Taylor "Fire And Rain"

The Clash "Should I Stay or Should I Go"

Marvin Gaye "Sexual Healing"

Radiohead "Paranoid Android"

M.I.A. "Paper Planes"

The Animals "We Gotta Get Out of this Place"

Dusty Springfield "Son of a Preacher Man"

Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put A Spell On You"

Cheap Trick "Surrender"

Mott The Hoople "All the Young Dudes"

Beach Boys "Sloop John B"

Amy Winehouse "Rehab"

New York Dolls "Personality Crisis"

Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

George Jones "He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Bruce Springsteen "Born in the USA"

The Beatles "With A Little Help From My Friends"

Rolling Stones 'Miss You'

The Coasters 'Run Red Run'

Elvis Costello, 'Alison'

James Brown, 'Hot (I Need to be loved loved loved)'

Inner Circle, 'Tenement Yard'

Ray Charles, 'I Don't Need No Doctor'

Curtis Mayfield, 'Freddy's Dead'

Gang Starr, 'Beyond Comprehension'

Bo Diddley, 'Bo Diddley'

Aretha Franklin, 'Rocksteady'

CCR, 'Have You Ever Seen the Rain'

Howlin' Wolf, 'Smokestack Lightning'

Bobby Womack, 'Across 110th Street'

Roy Orbison, 'In Dreams'

Foggy Hogtown Boys, 'Man of Constant Sorrow'

Pink Floyd, 'Wish You Were Here'

Neil Young, 'Cortez The Killer'

Bob Dylan, 'Subterranean Homesick Blues'

Little Eva, 'Loco-Motion'

Elvis Costello, 'Watching the Detectives'

Jimmy Cliff, 'The Harder They Come'

The Verve, 'Bittersweet Symphony'

Roberta Flack, 'Killing Me Softly with his Song'

R.E.M., 'Radio Free Europe'

Radiohead, 'No Surprises'

Led Zeppelin, 'Ramble On'

Rolling Stones, 'Beast of Burden'

Glen Campbell, 'Wichita Lineman'

Author: "Mark Wigmore"
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Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 11:55

Ready for a good old-fashioned country stomper set to a video featuring a ghost-dancer flying though a city of lights? We thought so.

Toronto's New Country Rehab is releasing their new video for the song "Lost Highway" today. It's the latest single from their latest album Ghost of Your Charms. Directed by Juno-award winner Christopher Mills (Blue Rodeo, Tragically Hip, Interpol), this video is a nod to Canadian director and animator Norman McLaren, who would have been 100 years old this year. 

New Country Rehab will be touring the U.S. this fall - check for dates here. Canadian dates will soon be announced. 

Watch our exclusive premiere of "Lost Highway" below.

LISTEN

Listen to our Hot Country stream to hear the best in new country music.

Author: "Andrea Gin"
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Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 11:55

We are less than a week away from finding out who will win the 2014 Polaris Music Prize. Have you decided which album you're cheering for yet?

If you have too many favourites in contention or if you haven't had time to immerse yourself in each of the 10 short listed albums, we've devised a shortcut flowchart to help you figure out which album to pick.

 

 

Which album did you end up on? Let us know in the comments below or tweet us @cbcradio3

LISTEN

Listen to Polaris Music Prize short listed artists on CBC Radio 3 with hosts Emma Godmere, Alanna Stuart and Lana Gay.


Author: "Andrea Gin"
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Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 10:00

The Rock Your Campus entries are in and now, for the next five weeks, it's up to you to vote. Vote early and vote often if you want your favourite act to win. You can vote for up to 10 acts per day.

We have listened to each and every track, and we're pleased to discover so many good bands. From B.C.'s hard-rocking Bastion Sounds to the lovely lilt of Newfoundland's Rosemary Lawton, the talent coming out of this country cannot be denied.

Click through the gallery above and discover some of our new favourite acts from across the country. Or, have a listen to our playlist below and hear for yourself. The future of Canadian music is in very, very good hands.

LISTEN

Rock Your Campus: class standouts
Round 1

Related:

Voting is open for the Rock Your Campus top 100

Rock Your Campus: 11 ways to win

Win $10,000 with Rock Your Campus

Rock Your Campus: meet your judges

Follow me on Twitter: @CBCJudith

Author: "Judith Lynch"
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Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 08:38
LISTEN

Saukrates

Amani

Stream to Sept. 23

Whether you realize it or not, you know Saukrates. The Toronto rapper made his debut in 1999 with The Underground Tapes, and despite not releasing another album for another 13 years (2012's Season One), he remained prolific, either rapping guest verses or singing hooks on songs from the likes of Drake, Nelly Furtado, Common, Redman, Maestro, Classified, Shad and K-os, to name a few.

With Amani, his new EP, Saukrates shows he's ready to come back in the spotlight. "This Soxx season," he raps on album opener "Kingdom Come," a fierce, soul-sampling banger produced by Snaz. That leads into the reflective Rich Kidd-produced title track ("Amani" is Saukrates's given name, which also means "peace" in Swahili). "FYEO," another Kidd production, features West Coast rapper SonReal over some woozy, ethereal beats, while "The Big Bang" shows Soxx at his lyrical best, delivering rapid-fire, tongue-twisting lines about his past, his family and why he deserves to be in the spotlight. 

Amani is available Sept. 23.

Amani tracklist

1. "Kingdom Come"
2. "Amani"
3. "FYEO"
4. "The Big Bang"

Follow Jesse Kinos-Goodin on Twitter: @JesseKG

Author: "Jesse Kinos-Goodin"
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Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 08:14

If you're into radio — contributing to it, making it or just tuning into it — college and university radio stations can be a goldmine. Unfettered by corporate sponsorship, heavy governmental regulations or, at times, even high expectations, what you hear on campus radio is the sound of freedom.

Dedicated hosts, deeply focused interviews, experimentation with music and format; it's all there on the dial. Songs that should perhaps never again see the light of day and your next new jam can often be found back to back.

In radio, if you get it wrong, nobody dies. If you get it right, man, what a thrill. Campus radio's where it's at. Below are some of the best campus radio shows out there right now.

The Rock Your Campus entries are in and now, for the next five weeks, it's up to you to vote. Vote early and vote often if you want your favourite act to win. You can vote for up to 10 acts per day.

School: University of Fraser Valley
Show: Pizza Punks Air Show
Station: CIVL 101.7 FM

Hosted by Ian Ruskin (Varsity Girls, Queen Bee and the Buzzkills) and Sam Costinak (CIVL music director and UFV student) Pizza Punks Air Show broadcasts on Thursday nights from 7-8 p.m. The programming focuses on the best of punk and low-fi, which makes the show very loud. And very awesome.

School: Simon Fraser University
Show: The Interview Show
Station: CJSF 90.1FM

On the air for more than five years and syndicated on eight stations across Canada, The Interview Show airs Mondays from 4:30 to 5 p.m. on CJSF. The format is simply to interview prominent local bands/musicians, but the depth of the Vancouver scene makes for a rich array of guests including Ra Ra Riot, Austra, Grimes, The Belle Game, Dan Deacon and others.

School: University of Ottawa
Show: City Slang
Station: CHUO 89.1 FM

This U of O program, hosted by program director Emmanuel Sayer and local music video director Travis Boisvenue, is relatively new but has already been picked up for syndication by other stations in the area. The programming has its eye on Ottawa's emerging punk rock and noise scene.

School: University of Alberta
Station: CKUA 94.9 FM

CKUA is the kind of campus station that you wish the privates would emulate. It's carefully curated and they provide a rich roster of jazz, folk, Celtic, world and classical programs. Too many to mention, but you can find a list here. Or, just tune in. You're bound to hear something you like.

 

School: University of Toronto
Show: Funky Fridays
Station: CIUT 89.5 FM

Campus radio is an excellent source of sounds and genres traditionally ignored by private radio. Hosted by Ken Stowes (station manager) and Dan Toner, CIUT celebrates funk every week on Funky Fridays.

Click below to listen:

School: Dalhousie University
Show: Halifax is Burning
Station: CKDU 88.1 FM

Dalhousie's Halifax is Burning keeps it local with a spotlight on the Halifax music scene, but not without an eye on the big picture. Host Trevor Murphy (Quiet Parade, Dance Movie) expertly guides the show and its listeners through the musical news you need to know and the latest bands making waves on the East Coast.

Click below to listen:

The Rock Your Campus entries are in and now, for the next five weeks, it's up to you to vote. Vote early and vote often if you want your favourite act to win. You can vote for up to 10 acts per day.

Related:

Rock Your Campus: vote now! 

9 bands who started their careers in college

Author: "Judith Lynch"
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Date: Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 07:01

Jackie Evancho is about to give her legions of fans more reasons to love her. The 14-year-old America’s Got Talent runner-up releases her third studio album this month, Awakening, in which the young soprano expands her focus beyond classical music.

“Some of these songs are more on the pop side, and have a little faster beat than the songs I usually sing,” she explains, before adding how fun it is to explore new territory. 

Those explorations lead her to U2’s “With or Without You” with an arrangement featuring both silky strings and a driving drum kit. She also performs “The Rains of Castamere” from HBO’s award-winning series Game of Thrones. 

This doesn’t mean a complete departure from the classical slant that Evancho's fans expect. She reached the finals on America’s Got Talent thanks to some of the most beloved classical melodies of all time. This time she takes on “Ave Maria” and Rachmaninoff’s “Vocalise.”

“I’d never sung Rachmaninoff’s ‘Vocalise’ before,” admits Evancho. “It was fun for me because there aren’t any words to learn, so I could focus on the beauty of the music.”

But everything on Awakening has one thing in common: “The only thing that mattered was that the song spoke to me.”

Awakening hits stores on Sept. 23. You can pre-order it here.

Tracklist

1. “Think of Me” 
2. “Your Love” 
3. “Je t'aime” 
4. “Take Me There” 
5. “Open Fields of Grace” 
6. “Ave Maria”
7. “Memories”
8. “The Rains of Castamere” 
9. “Dormi Jesu”
10. “Vocalise”
11. “With or Without You”
12. “Made to Dream”

Follow Michael Morreale on Twitter: @18mrm

LISTEN

Listen to CBC Music's Classical Serenity stream

Author: "Michael Morreale"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 19:55
Here they are, your top 30 Canadian indie songs this week!
LISTEN

CLICK HERE to listen to this week's R3-30 chart!

:: Click here to Vote on next week's chart!::

The R3-30 for the week of September 15 , 2014
30. Cool "I Can Handle That"
29. Lowell "I Love You Money"
28. Young Liars "Young Again"
27. Secret Broadcast "Killing Time"
26. Grimes "Go (feat. Blood Diamonds)"
25. Napalmpom "Sirius"
24. Michael Rault "All Alone (On My Own)"
23. White Lung "Down It Goes"
22. Sloan "Keep Swinging (Downtown)"
21. Glass Random "I Feel Better"
20. Reef Shark "Those Days"
19. Absolutely Free "Beneath The Air"
18. Mobina Galore "Bad Love Song"
17. Stuck on Planet Earth "Pain"
16. July Talk "Summer Dress"
15. Yes Nice "White Washed Walls"
14. Stars "From the Night"
13. Zeus "Miss My Friends"
12. Mac DeMarco "Blue Boy"
11. Arkells "Come To Light"
10. Rural Alberta Advantage "Terrified"
9. The Wooden Sky "Saturday Night"
8. Operators "True"
7. Hey Rosetta! "Kintsukuroi"
6. Stella Ella Ola "Hypersleep"
5. Sam Roberts Band "Shapeshifters"
4. PS I Love You "Limestone Radio"
3. Alvvays "Atop A Cake"
2.  Meligrove Band "Don'€™t Wanna Say Goodbye"
1. Death From Above 1979 "Trainwreck 1979"
And now on to...
The Listener List!
Every week we ask you to pick a few tracks to throw into a set during the show. We take a little detour from the R3-30 to play a few of the tracks you’ve chosen around a theme your picks, we call it the Listener List.
This week you’ll be hearing tracks around the theme ‘Dynamic Duos,’ aka an excuse to play some great two piece bands.
Now, time for a new theme: albums that should have won the Polaris Music Prize! Yes, with the Polaris Gala quickly approaching, let's look back to those years when you were shocked and appalled an album didn't win. Which record was it? 
Post your comments on the blog or tweet @cbcradio3
Author: "Lana Gay"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 18:35

Kenny G, the world’s smoothest jazz saxophonist, has done well for himself. But over the last decade, the Grammy-winning artist has only made about half of his income on music. The rest comes from hitting it big on the stock market, according to a new feature by Reuters.

The saxophonist was among the first investors in Starbucks, where shares have raised more 12,000 per cent since going public, according to Reuters. Another profitable venture was investing in Potash Corp of Saskatchewan. His secrets? Obsessive research and not listening to tips from friends.

It’s not surprising that Kenny G, whose real name is Kenneth Bruce Gorelick, has a degree in accounting from the University of Washington. He completed his degree while performing professionally, and has sold an estimated 75 million records since. 

Kenny G performs with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra this week.

Follow Michael Morreale on Twitter: @18mrm

Related:

10 reasons to forgive Kenny G

LISTEN

Listen to CBC Music's Smooth Jazz stream

Author: "Michael Morreale"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 16:51

If you've ever been a Simpsons fanatic, then you probably wish you'd been at the Hollywood Bowl this past weekend. To celebrate the show's 25th anniversary, the venue was turned into a miniature Springfield, and everyone from Weird Al Yankovic to Conan O'Brien took the stage to sing songs from the series, including "We Do (The Stonecutters' Song)," "Happy Birthday Lisa" and "The Monorail Song."

The latter is from the 1993 episode, "Marge vs. the Monorail," which was written by O'Brien. He was joined by the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles, and led the audience in the "Monorail, monorail, monorail" chorus. Check it out below.

Author: "Dave Shumka"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 15:11

We went to see rising post-R&B act How to Dress Well at his Toronto tour stop on Friday night. Here's what went down.

1) The almost-radio friendly pop of Nite Jewel

Friday night’s opening act Nite Jewel makes music that’s hooky, catchy, and accessible enough that it could almost be sandwiched between Rihanna and Kesha on a Top 40 station. But it’s not, because rather than cash in, Ramona “Nite Jewel” Gonzalez has opted to weird out and shoot her pop through with a hazy, lo-fi vibe that is just a little too far in left field for most folks, but was just perfect for us.

2) Nite Jewel educating the crowd

Towards the end of her set, Nite Jewel broke out a cover of Kate Bush’s classic “Hounds of Love.” Not only did she more than do justice to the Bush classic, she also started it with a preamble explaining Bush's very existence several people in the crowd said they'd never heard of the acclaimed British singer-songwriter. (Who are these people?)

3) The burning intensity of Tom Krell

When Tom Krell, otherwise known as How to Dress Well, takes the stage, he does so with an intesity that borders on alarming. His entire body is wracked with tension, he beats his chest and stands on his toes and closes his eyes and sways. He looks like he’s pained, like he’s overwhelmed by his own emotions, and it’s great.

4) Krell’s magnificent voice

From smooth and soothing to rough and raw to an almost impossibly high falsetto, Krell did an amazing job of showing off his vocal range, in terms of both octaves and emotions.

5) An amazing visual display

Most independent, How to Dress Well-level acts don’t have any sort of AV component at all. How to Dress Well has a fifth, unofficial member of his band whose job it is to set up a series of screens which show everything from pulsing kaleidoscopes to dreamy skyscapes to Super 8 collages.

6) Krell thanking everyone

Not only did he thank his band for “putting up with [him]” for the length of the tour, he also thanked their bus driver, the bartenders, the security staff and the janitors at the Mod Club. It was pretty special.

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 14:15

How was your weekend? Ours was great, thanks for asking. While you were off doing whatever it is you do on your down time, there was a fair bit of live music news breaking on the internet. Get caught up.

Lorde's Kanye West and Bon Iver covers was let out on the internet

So the most important part of doing a good cover song is making it sound like your own thing without making it sound like you're mocking the original song. By that metric, Lorde has been hitting it out of the park over the course of her most recent tour, including covers of both Kanye West's "Flashing Lights" and Bon Iver's "Heavenly Father" in her set. Pitchfork dug up video from a Philadelphia show earlier in the month over the weekend. Check that out below.

People started a petition to release Grimes's Boiler Room set

Last year, synth-pop artist and national treasure Grimes played a DJ set as part of Richie Hawtin's Boiler Room music series. She was accused of trolling the event by showing up, plugging in her iPod and playing songs by Taylor Swift, Vengaboys and Mariah Carey. It's one of the few Boiler Room sets that hasn't been released yet, and now there's a Change.org petition to let it out of the vault. The petition calls the set "Probably the best set ever played in the history of Boiler Room but they can't get past their own pretentiousness to see that." You can sign it here.

Beyoncé and Nicki Minaj played the 'Flawless' remix live in Paris

We were concerned that the gravitational pull of their collective flawlessness might cause a rip in the space-time continuum, but apparently everything was fine. The event was being filmed for an HBO special that will air on Sept. 20. Sadly, all the full-length YouTube videos of the event have been taken down, but here's a quick Instagram clip to give you a taste.

The James Street Super Crawl was a wild success

For those of you who weren’t able to make it to the festival that is cementing Hamilton’s place as a Canadian capital of arts and culture, here are a few videos that should convince you to make the trip in 2015.

Author: "Chris Dart"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 12:39

Each day, Rich Terfry and Radio 2 Drive wraps up your day with music and stories about the interesting things going on in the world.

 

RICH'S PICK: "Railroad Blues" by Woody Guthrie: 

 

JUNK IN THE TRUNK:

How cars party: 


An ant strikes it rich: 


Real dogs get pranked by a fake dog: 


 

REAR VIEW MIRROR:

Every week, Rich Terfry looks back in our Rear-view Mirror at a great song from the good ol’ days. This week, Elvis Presley with "Blue Suede Shoes."



When you think of the rock and roll classic, "Blue Suede Shoes", Elvis Presley probably comes to mind first. If you're a big fan of early rock and roll, you may know Carl Perkinswrote the song and recorded it first. You may also know Eddie Cochran and Buddy Hollyrecorded versions. But what you may not know is that the song originated with the one and only Johnny Cash.

LISTEN

Listen to Rich tell you the incredible story behind Elvis Presley's "Blue Suede Shoes."

In the fall of 1955, Carl Perkins was on tour in the U.S. with Elvis and Johnny Cash. One night, Johnny Cash told Perkins a story about a man with whom he served in the military. He referred to his regulation uniform footwear as his "blue suede shoes", even though they were made of black leather. Cash thought that had a nice ring to it and suggested Perkins use it for a song.

Perkins first thought was, "how the heck am I going to write a song about shoes?!" But a few weeks later, Perkins was playing a dance when he noticed a young couple dancing near the stage. He heard the young man say to his girlfriend, "uh-uh, don't step on my suedes!". That sealed the deal.

Later that night, Perkins woke up at 3 a.m. with the idea for the song in his head. He scrambled to find a piece of paper but wasn't able. All he was able to find was a potato sack, so he wrote the song on that. Funny enough, Perkins couldn't figure out how to spell the word 'suede'. He spelled it "S-W-A-D-E".



Shortly after recording the song, Perkins was on his way to appear on the Perry Como to perform it. He would have been the first rock singer to appear on national television. But he was involved in a serious car accident on the way. Perkins was badly hurt and his brother, who was traveling with him, was killed. Perkins never fully recovered from the accident - physically or emotionally. Elvis Presley, a former label mate of Perkins at Sun Records, decided to record a version of the song as a tribute to his friend and to help him out financially.

Here's the rock and roll classic that was a hit for Carl Perkins and helped make Elvis a star, the seeds of which were planted by Johnny Cash - this is "Blue Suede Shoes" on Rear View Mirror. 

 

Here are some other great editions of Rear-view Mirror:

Johnny Cash/Ring of Fire

The Kinks/You Really Got Me

The Beatles/Yesterday

Al Green/Let's Stay Together

Simon and Garfunkel/The Boxer

Smokey Robinson and the Miracles/Tracks of my Tears

Elvis Presley/Heartbreak Hotel

Bruce Cockburn/Lovers In A Dangerous Time

The Doors - Light My Fire

Bob Dylan & Jimi Hendrix/All Along The Watchtower 

The Clash/London Calling

Phil Spector and the Ronnettes/Be My Baby

Os Mutantes/Ando Meio Desligado

The Diamonds/Little Darlin

Captain Beefheart/Yellow Brick Road

Elton John/Bennie and the Jets

Hank Williams/Long Gone Lonesome Blues

R.E.M./What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

Tom Waits/Jockey Full of Bourbon

Neil Diamond/Sweet Caroline

The Who/Pinball Wizard

Buffalo Springfield/For What It's Worth

Five Man Electrical Band/Signs

Band Aid/Do They Know It's Christmas

John Lennon/Imagine

The Ugly Ducklings/Nothin

Bob Dylan/Tangled Up In Blue

The Beatles/Norwegian Wood

The Pursuit of Happiness/I'm An Adult Now

Bruce Springsteen/Born To Run

Arcade Fire/Wake Up

Gnarls Barkley/Crazy

Big Joe Turner/Shake Rattle and Roll

Martha and the Muffins/Echo Beach

Wilson Pickett/In The Midnight Hour

The Band/The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Fleetwood Mac/Go Your Own Way

The Animals/House of the Rising Sun

Ian and Sylvia/Four Strong Winds

James Brown/Please Please Please

John Cougar Mellencamp, 'Pink Houses'

Leonard Cohen/Suzanne

The Ramones/I Wanna Be Sedated

Blue Rodeo/Try

The Guess Who/American Woman

U2/I Still Have't Found What I'm Looking For

Janis Joplin/Me and Bobby McGee

Gordon Lightfoot "If You Could Read My Mind"

The Byrds "Eight Miles High"

Simon and Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence"

Bill Haley and his Comets "Rock Around The Clock"

The Velvet Underground "I'm Waiting For The Man"

Johnny Cash "Folsom Prison Blues"

Bobby Fuller "I Fought The Law"

Big Star "September Gurls"

The Hollies "Bus Stop"

Joy Division "Love Will Tear Us Apart"

Booker T and the MGs "Green Onions"

Jimi Hendrix "Hey Joe"

Neil Young "Rockin' in the Free World"

Dolly Parton "Jolene"

The Left Banke "Walk Away Renee"

Lou Reed "Walk On The Wild Side"

James Taylor "Fire And Rain"

The Clash "Should I Stay or Should I Go"

Marvin Gaye "Sexual Healing"

Radiohead "Paranoid Android"

M.I.A. "Paper Planes"

The Animals "We Gotta Get Out of this Place"

Dusty Springfield "Son of a Preacher Man"

Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put A Spell On You"

Cheap Trick "Surrender"

Mott The Hoople "All the Young Dudes"

Beach Boys "Sloop John B"

Amy Winehouse "Rehab"

New York Dolls "Personality Crisis"

Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

George Jones "He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Bruce Springsteen "Born in the USA"

The Beatles "With A Little Help From My Friends"

Rolling Stones 'Miss You'

The Coasters 'Run Red Run'

Elvis Costello, 'Alison'

James Brown, 'Hot (I Need to be loved loved loved)'

Inner Circle, 'Tenement Yard'

Ray Charles, 'I Don't Need No Doctor'

Curtis Mayfield, 'Freddy's Dead'

Gang Starr, 'Beyond Comprehension'

Bo Diddley, 'Bo Diddley'

Aretha Franklin, 'Rocksteady'

CCR, 'Have You Ever Seen the Rain'

Howlin' Wolf, 'Smokestack Lightning'

Bobby Womack, 'Across 110th Street'

Roy Orbison, 'In Dreams'

Foggy Hogtown Boys, 'Man of Constant Sorrow'

Pink Floyd, 'Wish You Were Here'

Neil Young, 'Cortez The Killer'

Bob Dylan, 'Subterranean Homesick Blues'

Little Eva, 'Loco-Motion'

Elvis Costello, 'Watching the Detectives'

Jimmy Cliff, 'The Harder They Come'

The Verve, 'Bittersweet Symphony'

Roberta Flack, 'Killing Me Softly with his Song'

R.E.M., 'Radio Free Europe'

Radiohead, 'No Surprises'

Led Zeppelin, 'Ramble On'

Rolling Stones, 'Beast of Burden'

Glen Campbell, 'Wichita Lineman'

Author: "Mark Wigmore"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 10:07

Leonard Cohen is the kind of artist that other musicians love to cover: his lyrics are rich, dense and evocative, and his melodies simple yet catchy. Cohen is a songwriter's songwriter; he can change your world in just three minutes, which is no easy feat. 

So when CBC Music embarked on curating a Leonard Cohen week in honour of the man's 80th birthday, we couldn't help but want to see for ourselves, up close and personal, how certain Canadian artists would rise to the challenge of covering this literary lion. Thus, the Cohen Sessions were born.

Over the next week we'll be rolling out one video per day, featuring songwriting master Ron Sexsmith, Polaris Prize-nominated folk musician Basia Bulat, young emerging artists Scott Helman and Reuben and the Dark plus indie veteran Jay Malinowski & the Deadcoast.

Ron Sexsmith

 Basia Bulat

Listen to Leonard Cohen's new album, Popular Problems, streaming exclusively in Canada at CBC Music until Sept. 21.

Click here to check out all the content throughout the week as it's published and let us know: what do you love most about Leonard Cohen? Tell us on social media using #CohenWeek or in the comments below. 

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 09:55

The Polaris Music Prize announcement is set to happen a week from now, so you know what that means: it's time for our annual people's choice Polaris poll!

There doesn't seem to be a clear favourite this year, with a mix of established artists like Arcade Fire and Owen Pallett going up against emerging artists like Jessy Lanza and Yamantaka // Sonic Titan

We'd like to find out who you think should win, so place your vote in our poll below. Before you vote, remember the mission statement of the prize: "[It] recognizes and markets albums of the highest artistic integrity, without regard to musical genre, professional affiliation or sales history." 

You can vote once a day. We'll keep the polls open until Thursday, Sept. 18, at 5 p.m. E.T. and reveal the people's choice winner on Friday morning. 

Who do you think will win? Who do you think should win? Vote and then let us know in the comments below or tweet us @cbcradio3

LISTEN

Listen to a playlist of the 2014 Polaris Music Prize short list nominees

Tracklist

Related: 

Check out all of our coverage of the 2014 Polaris Music Prize here.

LISTEN

Listen to all the 2014 Polaris Music Prize short list nominees on CBC Radio 3 with hosts Emma Godmere, Alanna Stuart and Lana Gay

Author: "Andrea Gin"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 07:59

Harmonica virtuoso Mike Stevens might have became a millionaire as a member of the Grand Ole Opry, until he discovered something more valuable 30 kilometres north of Goose Bay.

This is a feature article from the latest issue of CBC Music Magazine, about Why Music Matters. To download this or the previous issues, click below.

Download the CBC Music Magazine

Mike Stevens is an unlikely star of the Grand Ole Opry. Before him, no petrochemical worker from Sarnia, Ont., had ever performed on country music’s most famous stage, and if one tried, travelling with a banjo, fiddle or a guitar would be the safest route. But Stevens plays the harmonica, and bluegrass doesn’t always make room for the harmonica.


Stevens made his first televised Grand Ole Opry appearance alongside Jim & Jesse, with the legendary Roy Acuff looking on.

Before long, those who were thinking that bluegrass didn’t need the harmonica were the ones buying Stevens’s CDs. Other harmonica players began appearing at the Opry — copying his playing style — and two of the biggest names in bluegrass, Roy Acuff and Bill Monroe, were among his biggest fans. Stevens became a regular on the Opry stage (he estimates it at 300 performances) and there was talk of becoming an Opry member, which would’ve made him a millionaire. He was even given the highest honour by the Kentucky government when he was named “Kentucky Colonel.” Life, in his own words, was “just beyond my wildest dreams.”

Then his life and career were turned upside down.

In the fall of 2000, Stevens was set to perform at a movie theatre in Goose Bay, N.L., on a tour that would also take him to Alert, Nunavut, and Bosnia to give shows for Canadian peacekeepers. As he always does, he picked up a newspaper in search of a local reference to slip into his onstage banter. Spread across the pages were shocking stories and photos of nearby Sheshatshiu (pronounced “SHESH-a-shee”), where a community was struggling with high suicide rates and gas sniffing among its children. He dedicated that night’s performance of “Amazing Grace” to the kids in the newspaper, which drew an uncomfortable and icy silence from the crowd. After the show, a journalist wanted to drive Stevens to Sheshatshiu to see the community with his own eyes.

“I felt like a creep if I had an opportunity to go and see it first-hand and didn’t take it,” Stevens explained. “It would become part of a show instead of being a human being trying to connect and figure it out.”

The next morning they drove 40 kilometres north-east along Lake Melville to the end of the road. Mounds of dirt with Catholic or indigenous memorials dotted the side of the road, most with kids’ toys resting on them, marking the spots where suicide and substance abuse had taken its toll. 

“To be honest, I felt voyeuristic,” he said. “I knew I couldn’t walk away from this with just a story to bring home, I had to try and connect in some way.”

They arrived in Sheshatshiu and had just turned a corner at the community’s school when they saw a group of children and young teenagers holding green bags of gasoline over their mouths and noses. Stevens got out of the truck and did what came most naturally to him: he took out a harmonica and played “Amazing Grace.”

Media not computed.

Stevens says he looked into their eyes as he played and saw joy. They laughed (“not because they were buzzed”) and asked about his family and where he was from. He played a few more tunes and left having learned more about music than his whole “big-shot” career before that.

“I learned what music’s for,” he said. “You work your ass off and you practise and you play. Sure you get gratification when the crowd stands up or buys your CDs, but it’s deeper than that.

“There has to be a reason that you make art and not move furniture. They taught me that the real purpose for music is to connect on some level.”

That connection resonated deeply with Stevens; he was changed by the encounter. After 45 minutes the gas fumes were burning his face and he developed a migraine that lasted for days. He promised to help, and his work began the very next day.

Shortly after arriving in Alert, Stevens got a phone call from CBC Radio’s As It Happens, who had been tipped off about the encounter by the journalist who drove him to Sheshatshiu. In an emotionally raw interview with Mary Lou Finlay, Stevens told his story. He sounded angry and profoundly affected by what he saw. In one off-the-cuff comment, Stevens asked Canadians to send him instruments that he could take up to Sheshatshiu.

LISTEN

Listen to an excerpt of Mike Stevens being interviewed by Mary Lou Finlay on CBC Radio’s As It Happens on Nov. 23, 2000. Listen to more via the CBC Digital Archives.

Over the next several weeks, Stevens’s house filled up with donated instruments (“from the basement to roof, literally”). He loaded a transport truck until it was almost entirely full and went back to Sheshatshiu to hand out the instruments and give a workshop.

“Eighty kids came running in and it was beautiful!” he exclaimed. In the chaos, a photocopier was kicked over and a window was knocked out. He loved every minute of it.

Stevens has been back to Sheshatshiu more than 30 times since then. Each time he brings more instruments and invites guests to lead workshops. The students grew to trust him for returning, unlike several other aid projects that stopped showing up when funding ran out. 

The workshops incorporate Innu culture and use traditional knowledge from elders. Early in the lesson, Stevens asks kids to say their Innu names into the harmonica. Their next task is to play what a colour sounds like. It becomes their first composition.

In 2002, Stevens formalized his work under a charitable organization called ArtsCan Circle. It operates with no full-time staff or office and relies on mostly private donations, grants and fundraising house concerts. The organization’s biggest expense is travel. Today, ArtsCan Circle has expanded to several communities as far as Haida Gwaii, B.C., and Alaska, and has committed to visiting each community at least twice a year, giving workshops in visual art, puppetry, storytelling and, of course, music. 

As internet connectivity improves in these remote areas, Stevens and ArtsCan Circle have installed recording studios in the communities. When they aren’t being used for workshops given remotely, elders and children use the microphones to record and preserve their stories.

For Stevens, it’s about so much more than simply teaching students about music.

“My biggest fear is that people think I’m going in trying to fix something,” he said. “It’s not that. I’m trying to build relationships and trust. The instruments are the gateway but it’s way deeper than that. That’s where the magic happens.”

Stevens still performs regularly, though many of his performances are fundraising concerts. He is considered one of the most technically gifted harmonica players in the world, and his virtuosic playing style is so forceful that he destroyed the valve that keeps food down. If he were to stand on his head, his stomach would empty itself. Playing the instrument has given him seven hernias.

It’s been nearly 15 years since that first trip to Sheshatshiu, and Stevens is still keen to expand. He promises that if the funding ever dries up (and it’s gotten close), he’ll continue to find a way to go north and use music to connect with the kids. You can hear the compassion in every word he says.

Follow Michael Morreale on Twitter: @18mrm

Related:

Introducing the CBC Music Magazine

Music therapy: something for everyone, funded by (almost) no one

The memory key: how music is unlocking the minds of people with Alzheimer's

LISTEN

Listen to CBC Radio 2

Author: "Michael Morreale"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 07:57

Voting is now open for Rock Your Campus!

The contest is divided into several rounds, and this round will choose the top 100. So don't just vote for your favourite artist — vote for all the artists you think deserve attention and radio play, at your school and across Canada.

You can always find the polls here on the Rock Your Campus homepage in the "Vote now!" tab as well as links to vote for specific artists on their CBC Music artist profiles

You can vote for up to 10 different artists every day. So make sure you check out the other acts and help promote the best music at home and across Canada.

If you have questions, email us at rockyourcampus@cbc.ca.

In the meantime, check out these tips on how to make the most of Rock Your Campus. Good luck to all who entered, and enjoy listening to the best new music Canada has to offer!

And, just to sweeten the deal, go to Rock Your Campus on CBC Music after you vote to enter to win a Samsung tablet — just a little thank you for participating.

Voting for this round ends on Oct. 2.

Voting rounds

Round 1: Sept. 14 to Oct. 2

Round 2: (top 100) Oct. 3-16

Round 3: (top 10) Oct. 17-23

Judging: Oct. 26

Winner announced: Oct. 27

Author: "Nicolle Weeks"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 07:23

If you're a fan of Leonard Cohen's songs, chances are it's impossible to choose a favourite. The one. The best.

Many people default to "Hallelujah," because of course, it's gorgeous, painful, evocative and occupies a certain space in pop culture thanks to some astounding covers (Jeff Buckley and k.d. lang, for instance). But Cohen's catalogue is rich, with at least 50 songs that could all vie for top spot in a ranked list.

Instead, CBC Music brings you 25 essential Cohen songs, with writeups from everybody such as Margaret Atwood and Mitsou to Chvrches and CBC Music staff. Click through the gallery above to read about why we chose these particular Cohen gems, and click on the playlist below to keep the music going while you read.

Now tell us: what's your favourite Leonard Cohen song? Click here to vote for yours and a chance to win Cohen's discography!


Listen to Leonard Cohen's new album, Popular Problems, streaming exclusively in Canada at CBC Music until Sept. 21.

Click here to check out all the content throughout the week as it's published and let us know: what do you love most about Leonard Cohen? Tell us on social media using #CohenWeek or in the comments below.

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 07:21

Listen to Leonard Cohen's new album, Popular Problems, streaming exclusively in Canada at CBC Music until Sept. 21.

Musicians and CBC personalities have had their say on the 25 essential Leonard Cohen songs, but we want to know what you think: vote now for your favourite Cohen number and enter to win a complete Leonard Cohen discography courtesy of Sony Canada and CBC Music.

Click here to read CBC's contest rules and regulations.

Click here to check out all the content throughout the week as it's published and let us know: what do you love most about Leonard Cohen? Tell us on social media using #CohenWeek or in the comments below.

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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Date: Monday, 15 Sep 2014 04:01

Leonard Cohen is forever and always a ladies' man. His moments of self-deprecation don't detract from his easy confidence, the purr of his voice. When he sings, scraping the bottom of his register, it reminds me of this lush, black velvet bag with gold drawstrings that we once used to hold all our Scrabble tiles, this warm enclosure where words would linger in anticipation.

Cohen turns 80 on Sept. 21, and to celebrate he's releasing a new record, Popular Problems, which you can listen to below exclusively on CBC Music (Canada only) via Sony Canada, one week before its release on Sept. 23. You can pre-order Popular Problems here.

Considering Cohen's prolific output, it almost seems weird that this is only his 13th album, but his perfectionist tendencies serve him well here. Popular Problems is loaded with moments of stark beauty and some sonic surprises, such as the alt-folk leanings of "Did I Ever Love You" and the twangy, bluesy "My Oh My."

According to his label, Cohen likes to describe the record's sound as "fresh," which could also just be a substitute for "modern." His influences have changed, and he continues to grow and evolve, further honing and perfecting his craft. He resists the stereotypes that dictate aging equals stagnation; that it dulls what was once sharp, precise, observant. 

The only thing softer here is Cohen's heart. He sings with more tenderness than ever before, as if love has finally fully penetrated his darkest recesses, particularly on the album's sweet closer, "You Got Me Singing." Love is one of those popular problems after all, and Cohen may finally be in a place where the master has become the student. It's a beautiful bit of role reversal. 

Click here to check out all the content throughout the week as it's published and let us know: what do you love most about Leonard Cohen? Tell us on social media using #CohenWeek or in the comments below.

Come hang out with me on Twitter: @_AndreaWarner

Author: "Andrea Warner"
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