• Shortcuts : 'n' next unread feed - 'p' previous unread feed • Styles : 1 2

» Publishers, Monetize your RSS feeds with FeedShow:  More infos  (Show/Hide Ads)


Date: Tuesday, 31 Dec 2013 16:11

Personal posts about topics like the glories of the New York Yankees will move to jmassengale.tumblr.com or blog.massengale.me: TBD.

blog.massengale.com

Happy New Year

 

Wreath

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Baseball, Books, Classicis..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 31 Dec 2013 15:58

Philip [Johnson] was always a perfect gentleman of the old school. But once I saw his wit and grace take an almost grandfatherly form.

It was at the end of a splendid fall day that I had spent with him at New Canaan, reporting an article I was writing for Vanity Fair. My wife and children arrived to pick me up. As he came out of the Glass House to greet them, casting long shadows in the golden, late afternoon sun, my then-four-year-old daughter surveyed the Empyrean scene and its ancient,white, wizard-ish lord.

He welcomed her, and she looked up at him and earnestly asked, "Were you here when the world first started?"

"At last," he replied, taking her two little hands in his, "someone who 'understands' me."

Kurt Andersen

 

Glasshouse
Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Jokes, Quote of the Day"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Saturday, 28 Dec 2013 20:05

EustonStationClick on the photo for a larger view

FROM THE COMMENTS SECTION: Let's look at the photo again. The arch is lipstick on a pig. The station behind it looks like a Los Angeles shopping mall circa 1980–in the heart of one of the world's great cities.

The people in the drawing look like ants. The building behind them has nothing that relates to human scale. It doesn't even look like humans built it: there is no sense it was touched by a human hand, either in the design or the construction.

London is an enormously wealthy city these days. It can't do better than that? (postscript after the jump)

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, Culture, Curre..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 25 Dec 2013 15:13

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, Culture, Music..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 23 Dec 2013 17:04

The psychotherapist Carl Jung wrote about everything, including traffic engineers:

All time-saving methods, to which alleviaton of traffic congestion and other conveniences belong, do not, paradoxically, save any time, but simply fill the time available in such a manner that one has no more time at all. The result of this is inevitable, breathless haste, superficiality and nervous fatigue with all the related symptoms like nervous hunger, impatience, irritability, distractedness etc...

I found this at a public transit blog. Also take a look at their most popular link, P.J. O'Rourke's paean to the car in Give War A Chance ("...even if all these accusations are true, the automobile is still an improvement on its principal alternative, the pedestrian. Pedestrians are easily damaged. Try this test: Hit a pedestrian with a car. Now have the pedestrian hit the car back.... Which is in better shape?").

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Culture, Jokes, New Urbanism, Quote of t..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 16 Dec 2013 20:40
Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Culture, Current Affairs, New Urbanism, ..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 16 Dec 2013 17:58

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, Current Affair..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Saturday, 16 Nov 2013 15:16

ONE of the many great things about New York City is that it's easy to get from New York to many great places. We tend to head northeast to New England.

The Berkshire mountains in Western Massachusetts are distinctly not in New York, even though many New Yorkers visit the Berkshires. There are many beautiful ways to drive there, none of which require getting on an interstate highway. You can make the trip in 2 hours, or you can make it take all day. There are also trains to Dutchess County, New York, and people are working on a reviving the old rail line, which still has daily freight trains.

OldNorthNewMarlOld North Road, New Marlborough, Massachusetts

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, New Urbanism, ..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Saturday, 16 Nov 2013 15:16

ONE of the many great things about New York City is that it's easy to get from New York to many great places. We tend to head northeast to New England.

OldNorthNewMarlOld North Road, New Marlborough, Massachusetts

The Berkshire mountains in Western Massachusetts are distinctly not in New York, even though many New Yorkers visit the Berkshires. There are many beautiful ways to drive there, none of which require getting on an interstate highway. You can make the trip in 2 hours, or you can make it take all day. There are also trains to Dutchess County, New York, and people are working on a reviving the old rail line, which still has daily freight trains.

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, New Urbanism, ..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 13 Nov 2013 15:13

Gherkin-erectile-disfunction-treatment-ad-sq

"Key members of the Council said on Tuesday that the proposal — to rezone a 73-block area into a district of sleek glass towers that Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said would make New York competitive with London and other world-class cities—" New York Times: End of Proposal to Raise Skyline on the East Side
Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Current Affairs, Jokes, Ne..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 13 Nov 2013 15:13

Gherkin-erectile-disfunction-treatment-ad-sq

"Key members of the Council said on Tuesday that the proposal — to rezone a 73-block area into a district of sleek glass towers that Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said would make New York competitive with London and other world-class cities—" New York Times: End of Proposal to Raise Skyline on the East Side
Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Current Affairs, Jokes, Ne..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Saturday, 09 Nov 2013 01:56

The New York CIty Council's vote on Mayor Bloomberg's proposed upzoning for East Midtown will probably be taken on November 13th or 14th. To download the text of my testimony to Community Board 5, click here. If you have any influence on the New York City Council, please help slow down this hurried, lame-duck plan.

MassengaleEastMidtownTestimony

Download My Midtown Testimony

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, Current Affair..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 05 Nov 2013 22:02

15cpw

THE ARCHITECTURE CRITIC for New York magazine wrote about the work of Robert A.M. Stern in an article entitled Unfashionably Fashionable. I commented:

"There are two kinds of music," Duke Ellington famously said. "Good music, and the other kind."

When I had Bob Stern as a teacher, the architectural academy and the architectural establishment were equally open-minded. Bob Stern, Peter Eisenman, Léon Krier, Michael Graves, Richard Meier and many others formed a disparate and friendly group that agreed with Duke Ellington, accepting many things (and each other), as long as they were good.

Today, we have ideologues controlling much of "the discourse" in the academy and the establishment. In musical terms, they are saying that everyone must work in the tradition of Philip Glass: Classical music, Hip Hop, bebop, jazz, folk, rock, indie rock, pop...are all verboten. They're more close minded than the Tea Party.

Is this about to change? Things like the New York article or one in the magazine of the American Institute of Architects by Aaron Betsky in which Betsky calls the traditional work of former Stern employee Tom Kligerman "breathtaking in its sophistication and beauty," suggest that maybe they are. The magazine has probably never published Kligerman's work, and has certainly never praised it before.

Worth noting: like most people other than architects, the readers of New York are not ideological about traditional or modern design. You particularly see this in New York in the hangouts of the young and the hip, where you find traditional design, modern design, and places that comfortably combine both. Craftsmanship and natural materials, both conspicuously missing in the work of most Starchitects and New York's gleaming tall towers, have been strong trends for years.

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, Culture, Curre..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 05 Nov 2013 22:02

15cpw

THE ARCHITECTURE CRITIC for New York magazine wrote about the work of Robert A.M. Stern in an article entitled Unfashionably Fashionable. I commented:

"There are two kinds of music," Duke Ellington famously said. "Good music, and the other kind."

When I had Bob Stern as a teacher, the architectural academy and the architectural establishment were equally open-minded. Bob Stern, Peter Eisenman, Léon Krier, Michael Graves, Richard Meier and many others formed a disparate and friendly group that agreed with Duke Ellington, accepting many things (and each other), as long as they were good.

Today, we have ideologues controlling much of "the discourse" in the academy and the establishment. In musical terms, they are saying that everyone must work in the tradition of Philip Glass: Classical music, Hip Hop, bebop, jazz, folk, rock, indie rock, pop...are all verboten. They're more close minded than the Tea Party.

Is this about to change? Things like the New York article or one in the magazine of the American Institute of Architects by Aaron Betsky in which Betsky calls the traditional work of former Stern employee Tom Kligerman "breathtaking in its sophistication and beauty," suggest that maybe they are. The magazine has probably never published Kligerman's work, and has certainly never praised it before.

Worth noting: like most people other than architects, the readers of New York are not ideological about traditional or modern design. You particularly see this in New York in the hangouts of the young and the hip, where you find traditional design, modern design, and places that comfortably combine both. Craftsmanship and natural materials, both conspicuously missing in the work of most Starchitects and New York's gleaming tall towers, have been strong trends for years.

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, Culture, Curre..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 01 Nov 2013 18:46
IMG_4561

Reports that the parent company of Citi Bike is having major financial problems may explain all the glitches in the New York system, which mainly come from insufficient resources to redistribute and fix the bikes. Through the miracle of Twitter, I connected with a reporter who is writing about this, and sent her the following notes:

I've used bike share in London, Barcelona, Madison, Boston, Fort Worth, Salt Lake, DC, Miami, West Palm Beach and perhaps other places I don't remember. I have never seen the redistribution problems I see here. In London, you frequently see flatbed trucks driving around the city redistributing bikes. In New York, I've seen one small van, once.

I regularly try to use the station at 57th Street and Broadway. My success rate finding a working bike there in the morning is perhaps 10%. At my office, the three nearest stations are at Mercer and Bleecker, in front of the Puck Building, and next to the Lafayette Café, on Great Jones Street. It is quite common to find that all three are full in the morning, and the stations at Mercer and Bleecker can be full at other times too.

Yesterday I waited 5 to 10 minutes for someone to show up at the station on 44th Street at Fifth Avenue so I could return a bike. In front of Eataly at Madision Square is often full. Etc., etc. etc. I have never had either of these problems—full stations and empty stations—in other cities.

There is a dock at Mercer and Bleecker that has been broken for at least 3 weeks (and I know about lifting the bike when the dock doesn't work). The stations I use where there are no working bikes always have multiple broken stations or broken bikes locked in the stations.

Lots of the bikes have trouble with second gear (you fix that by gently nudging the shifter). Some have brake problems. Many have seat adjustment problems: either the tightener doesn't work, or the seat can't be moved. This all speaks of insufficient allocation of resources to keep the system working well. Because the bikes are all in a database, the redistribution of bikes is actually quite easy, if there were trucks and manpower to do it.

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Current Affairs, New York, Urbanism"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 01 Nov 2013 18:46
IMG_4561

Reports that the parent company of Citi Bike is having major financial problems may explain all the glitches in the New York system, which mainly come from insufficient resources to redistribute and fix the bikes. Through the miracle of Twitter, I connected with a reporter who is writing about this, and sent her the following notes:

I've used bike share in London, Barcelona, Madison, Boston, Fort Worth, Salt Lake, DC, Miami, West Palm Beach and perhaps other places I don't remember. I have never seen the redistribution problems I see here. In London, you frequently see flatbed trucks driving around the city redistributing bikes. In New York, I've seen one small van, once.

I regularly try to use the station at 57th Street and Broadway. My success rate finding a working bike there in the morning is perhaps 10%. At my office, the three nearest stations are at Mercer and Bleecker, in front of the Puck Building, and next to the Lafayette Café, on Great Jones Street. It is quite common to find that all three are full in the morning, and the stations at Mercer and Bleecker can be full at other times too.

Yesterday I waited 5 to 10 minutes for someone to show up at the station on 44th Street at Fifth Avenue so I could return a bike. In front of Eataly at Madision Square is often full. Etc., etc. etc. I have never had either of these problems—full stations and empty stations—in other cities.

There is a dock at Mercer and Bleecker that has been broken for at least 3 weeks (and I know about lifting the bike when the dock doesn't work). The stations I use where there are no working bikes always have multiple broken stations or broken bikes locked in the stations.

Lots of the bikes have trouble with second gear (you fix that by gently nudging the shifter). Some have brake problems. Many have seat adjustment problems: either the tightener doesn't work, or the seat can't be moved. This all speaks of insufficient allocation of resources to keep the system working well. Because the bikes are all in a database, the redistribution of bikes is actually quite easy, if there were trucks and manpower to do it.

Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Current Affairs, New York, Urbanism"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 25 Oct 2013 12:59
Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, Culture, Film,..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 25 Oct 2013 12:59
Author: "John Massengale" Tags: "Architecture, Classicism, Culture, Film,..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Next page
» You can also retrieve older items : Read
» © All content and copyrights belong to their respective authors.«
» © FeedShow - Online RSS Feeds Reader