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Date: Wednesday, 30 Jul 2014 18:00

Getting started with your Ponoko Personal Factory

In this back-to-basics tutorial video, we walk through the process of making a set of laser cut coasters from a free design file.

Following these steps is a great way to get started with Ponoko and realise what’s possible using your own Personal Factory.

In a few short minutes, you will know how to:

• Download a free design file
• Add it to your Personal Factory
• Choose material options to get personal pricing
• Place an order

We’ve made it really easy to start making and get a feel for the laser cutting process. Stay tuned for future posts in this back-to-basics series as you work towards generating your own custom designs and becoming a successful digital maker.

Here is where you can download the free design file featured in the video: Custom Made Coasters

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Laser Cutting, Laser Cuttin..."
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Date: Monday, 28 Jul 2014 05:10

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #185

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut wood box from Cedar Street Design.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, birds, anchors, dogs, & planters…

Above are laser cut wood earrings from Green Tree Jewelry.

Above are laser cut paper confetti from Decorate Your Big Day.

Above is a laser cut Dachshund rubber stamp from Etchythings.

Above is a laser cut walnut wood ampersand from Alexis Mattox Design.

Above is a laser cut wood planter from One Man One Garage.

Author: "Sam" Tags: "Art, Inventions, Jewellery, Laser Cut Wo..."
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Date: Friday, 25 Jul 2014 17:59

A quicker, cheaper alternative to raster fill engraving

Vector or Raster? It’s a question that has goes back to the earliest days of laser etching. Here is an interesting little exploration from the creative team over at Cuddleburrito that scores another point for the Vector camp.

Instead of using a raster fill for a job that required large graphic elements, they devised a way to create the same effect using vector paths.

This saves a huge amount of time, as the laser only needs to engrave the actual paths of the lines instead of sweeping across the entire area. There was an added bonus that the outcome has a more consistent appearance when applied on timber, because the tendency for grain variation to be emphasized (as when using raster etching) had been eliminated.

Want to know how they did it? Click through to the source to find out…

via Cuddleburrito

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Laser Cut Wood, Laser Cutti..."
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 18:00

Useful information for both new users and laser cutting veterans

Are you a seasoned Ponoko maker? Or perhaps your imagination has been tingling and you are bursting to make your very first Ponoko product.

Either way, here is a top-10 list that we think will come in handy for those new to laser cutting, and it also contains useful information that will help more experienced Ponoko members keep things running smoothly.

Let us know what you would add!

1. How long it will take to make and ship your order.

We make all orders as quickly as we can, and how long that takes depends on the volume of orders we are processing at any one time. Due to the number of variables involved, we’ve written a separate post to help you work out the likely total time your order will take.
Read about our order timeframes.

2. If you are using Inkscape, you MUST use our design templates, or your design will be sized incorrectly.

We strongly recommend that everyone use our templates for laying out their laser cutting designs. If you are using Inkscape *it is 100% necessary*. The way that Inkscape works with measurements is different to other vector-based design software packages, and if you do not use our templates your parts will be made the wrong size. If you’ve already got an Inkscape design ready, we have created a guide to putting it on our templates.
Read how to place existing Inkscape designs onto our templates.

…so that’s the first two, and there are eight further important pointers to wrap your head around when you continue reading the full post.  

3. Our material sheets are larger than the usable white area of our templates.

The white ’safe area’ inside the orange border of our templates is the guaranteed make-able area on our material sheets. We ensure that there is always a border of material around whatever you make.  That way none of your parts will run off the edge of the sheet and your parts will be better protected during shipping. Because of this, you must ensure ALL your design fits inside the orange border. This also means that if you want to make something with a straight, lasered edge, you need to add a blue cut line around the inside of the orange border of the template.
Read about adding cut lines to the outside of your design.

4. Material thickness can vary and is not guaranteed.

This possible variance is referred to as thickness tolerance. The thickness measurements we provide are the ones given to us by our material suppliers and manufacturers – who also specify a tolerance range +/-  a certain percentage. We have noted these % variations on the material catalog pages. Note that this variance makes designing interlocking laser cut projects challenging.
Read our advice for creating wooden interlocking laser cut designs.
Read our advice for creating acrylic interlocking laser cut designs.

5. The amount of material burned away by the laser can vary.

The amount of material burned or melted away by the laser is referred to as kerf width. Kerf width can vary due to a number of factors, such as:
- variance in material thickness and density
- whether the laser is cutting a horizontal, diagonal, or curved line
- where on the sheet the laser is cutting, due to variations in the optics as it moves around
As such, there is a limit to how precise your measurements can be when using laser cutting. Although laser cutting is fantastic for a huge variety of projects, it’s not the most appropriate if you need EXACT sizing.

6. If you place two cut lines too close together, there may be little or no material left between them.

As mentioned above, every time the laser cuts a line an amount of material is removed from each side of the line you have drawn. This means that any areas in your design where cutting lines come closer together than 0.5mm could potentially be burned away entirely, and any places where they are narrower than 1mm are likely to be quite fragile. A good way to spot these is to change your line weights to 0.2mm and print your design out on paper – in which case you’ll see how much material will likely be left between your cuts.
Read about how this effects the placement of holes on the edges of your pieces.

7. Every cut line and vector engraving line in your file will be made by the laser.

You should ensure that only the vector line information NEEDED to make your design is present in your file. You never want to try and hide cut lines or vector engraving lines behind fills – they will be made by the laser-cutter whether visible in ‘Preview’ mode or not.

8. Raster fill engraving takes a long time, and can substantially add to your making cost.

Raster fill engraving is often the most time consuming part of a design because the laser must pass over the filled area many times to engrave it. When you do use raster fill engraving, it’s best to keep all of your raster fill engraved areas as close together as possible. This is because the head of the laser will have to pass over the gaps between the areas to be engraved on the same horizontal line many times before the job is done. This can unnecessarily increase your making time and cost.

9. Very small parts (5mm/0.197″ round/square and smaller) can fall through the laser bed during cutting and be lost.

When we cut your design, your sheet of material sits upon a honeycomb-like bed. This structure holds up the material without heating up too much so that it burns the back of the sheet. What this means, however, is that very tiny pieces smaller than 5mm round/square can fall through the honeycomb bed during the cutting process. This is something that cannot be avoided, so your best option is to add extra tiny elements to your design to account for those which may be lost.

10. The laser cutter will ignore ‘dashed line’ effects – so you need to ensure they’re formatted right.

All our supported vector-based software packages have the ability to add a ‘dashed line’ effect to lines in your design. Unfortunately, this effect on its own is only for looks, and if you view your design in Outline mode, you’ll see that the dashes are not genuine vector information. As a result, if you want to include dashed lines in your design, you’ll need to either create them by either:
- adding lots of nodes/anchor points to your line and manually removing every other segment, or
- using a thicker line with the ‘dashed line’ effect, expanding it into small filled segments, and using raster fill engraving
Read more about creating correctly formatted dashed lines.


That completes our 10 things you should know list. You can find this information along with a whole collection of other useful tips in the Tutorials section of the Ponoko forum. It’s a great place to explore and gather all the info you need to produce successful outcomes using your Ponoko Personal Factory.

Ponoko Tutorials

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Laser Cutting, Laser Cuttin..."
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Date: Monday, 21 Jul 2014 04:50

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #184

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut silver earrings from Chrysalism.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, crows, flowers, corners, and free hugs…

Above is a laser cut and etched brooch from Kate’s Little Store.

Above is laser cut paper from CCCScrapbooking.

Above is a laser cut birch wood pendant from EgoLoss.

Above is a laser cut acrylic Face Hugger ornament from 3 Quarter Moon Creative.

Author: "Sam" Tags: "Fashion + Textiles, Functional Art + Obj..."
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Date: Friday, 18 Jul 2014 17:47

Teaching kids how to build their own mini making machines

Designed for a workshop series that introduces kids to building their own motor controllers, the Sphere-O-Bot is a simple 2 axis CNC machine that can draw on small spherical surfaces. Suggested target spheres include ping pong balls, eggs and even golf balls are apparently worth a try.

There is a thorough tutorial on Instructables that will take you through the thinking behind the laser cut wooden design, and show just how to put it all together. Files are included for the laser cut structure as well as specs for all the hardware required to get the Sphere-O-Bot up and running.

This fun project was uploaded by Juan, a Maker Corps intern at the Children’s Museum of Houston, who says:

“By building your Sphere-O-Bot using a laser cutter, you can achieve a clean look while also reducing the production time of your parts. This design also features an electronics bay for your wires, micro-controller and motor drivers.”

via Instructables

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Hardware, Laser Cut Wood, L..."
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 17:45

Helpful advice on how to get started with the Ponoko Personal Factory

For those who have always wanted to give Ponoko a go but are not sure where to start, this training video shows just how easy it is to produce your own laser cut designs.

In a little over ten minutes, Josh talks through the process of using Ponoko, and highlights a small project that makes a great starting point to help you feel your way with the Ponoko Personal Factory.

The material overview covers felt, cut and engraved bamboo, leather, 3d objects assembled from laser cut acrylic, and laser cut plywood. There is also advice on which materials are the best to get started with – and how to avoid common ‘beginner’ mistakes.

Then it gets to the good stuff – a neat little demo of how to actually make your very first product. The walkthrough explains how to use Inkscape to create a file that can be uploaded to Ponoko for laser cutting.

Starting with the Ponoko P1 template, Josh quickly whips up a collection of forms that use both laser cutting (for outlines) and laser etching (for surface details).

The upload process is then explained, with useful tips on how to check your files are correct and also how to order multiple copies of your design. Next comes material selection, which reveals some very useful information – how much it will cost! You’ll see that it’s really easy to switch to another material and see the price adjust accordingly in an instant.

The video wraps up with a few more handy design tips to be sure you start off on the right track.

Sound like fun? We think so. Watch the video, then dive right in!

source: The basics of laser cutting with Ponoko

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Laser Cut Wood, Laser Cutti..."
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Date: Tuesday, 15 Jul 2014 21:54

This month, we’ve added three new premium wood veneers to our materials catalogue. To celebrate, we’re throwing a design challenge with $2,500+ in prizes up for grabs!

The Challenge:

Using one of our new premium materials, design a product that flaunts your creative brilliance and showcases the quality of our new premium materials.

The Materials:

Left to right: 3.5mm Maple, Cherry & Walnut Veneer. Click here to enlarge.

These high quality veneers have a wood laminate on each side which is sanded smooth and finished with a clear coat. The premium appearance makes these materials ideal for jewelry, coasters, clocks, or other high end products.

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How to Enter:

Step 1 – Make with a Free P1:

Place an order with your Personal Factory using one or more of our new premium materials. To give you a leg up, your first P1 is on us.

Step 2 – Submit:

Take some great photos of your creation and share them with us on Twitter, Facebook and/or Instagram before 10pm PDT on August 24, 2014. Use the hashtag #ponokonewmaterials to make your entry official.

Step 3 – Vote:

We will select the top sumbissions and post them on our blog for the community to vote; then it’s up to you to tell your friends and family to head over to our blog so they can vote for you!

Check out the design challenge rules & guidelines for all of the competition details.

Competition Calendar:

The Prizes: (Over $2,500 up for grabs!)

  • Grand Prize – $600 worth of making with your Personal Factory + free Prime for one year ($1,068 value.)
  • 2nd Place – $450 worth of making with your Personal Factory + free Prime for one year ($918 value.)
  • 3rd Place – $300 worth of making with your Personal Factory + free Prime for 6 months ($434 value.)

How Voting Works:

Ponoko will select the finalists and post them to our blog on August 26th, 2014. Readers with vote for their favorites on our blog between August 26th and September 1st.

All winners will be announced via the blog on August 26th, 2014.

Judging Criteria:

Finalists will be selected using the following criteria, in no particular order:

  • Clarity and resolution of design.
  • Originality.
  • Presentation and photography.
  • Interesting use of material(s).
  • Attention to detail.
  • Production feasibility.
  • Market appeal.

Again, be sure to check out all of the competition rules and guidelines before submitting, and good luck!

Author: "Dan Devorkin" Tags: "Art, Contests + Competitions, Design, Fu..."
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Date: Monday, 14 Jul 2014 06:28

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #183

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut acrylic sewing machine brooch from Girl on The Rocks.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, fish, and puzzles…

Above is a laser cut French Pop Tone paper fish from Ellen Schofield.

Above is a laser cut and etched bass wood fish magnet from Humble Elephant.

Above is a laser cut oak plywood reversible puzzle from 3 Star Studio.

Author: "Sam" Tags: "Art, Fashion + Textiles, Jewellery, Lase..."
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Date: Saturday, 12 Jul 2014 14:13

Using a laser cutter to make a speaker casing with style

When Chilean designer Francisco Sahli needed to take his tunes on the road, he decided the best way would be to make his own stylish bluetooth speaker.

Many makers turn to laser cutting to build enclosures for their electronic projects. What sets this example apart is the departure from the usual boxy laser cut forms, with the result looking much more like a manufactured product.

Rather than the usual slotted laser cut corners, Francisco achieved a smooth radius and angled faces by laser cutting timber profiles and then laminating them together.

The final assembly was then carefully sanded by hand, before three coats of paint were applied. You can read all about the construction process, see the laser cutting paths and find out what’s inside to make the bluetooth speaker work its magic on Francisco’s website.

via Francisco Sahli

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Hardware, Laser Cut Wood, L..."
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Date: Thursday, 10 Jul 2014 18:00

Taking a step back to go through some laser cutter basics.

What is laser cutting, and why are we so excited about it?
As we’ll see in this brief overview, laser cutting is a relatively simple technology that makes it possible to cut or etch forms from sheet materials.

Laser cutters work in a similar way to other CNC (computer controlled) tools, however the cutting is done with a powerful beam of light instead of a sharp blade. To cut, the laser beam is focused to hit the material at a precise point, causing it to melt, burn or vaporize. Etching is achieved by focusing the laser on the surface of the material, where it will only burn or vaporize the topmost layer.

Laser Cutting is particularly useful because it works touch-free, meaning no mechanical forces or pressures are transferred to the material. This enables delicate cutting paths that can be repeated with a high level of precision, whether they are cut all the way through the material or etched as an impression onto the surface.  

Materials that respond well to laser cutting and etching vary from natural and engineered timbers through to polymers such as ABS and Acrylic. Paper and cardboard are often used as cheap mockup materials to test a design, although there are artists who produce impressive final works in these less durable materials. Metals such as aluminium and steel can also be laser cut and etched successfully, and people have even made experiments etching onto various foods. Tasty as it may be, laser etched food is not in the Ponoko materials catalog!

The video above shows the Ponoko logo being laser cut from white corrugated cardboard, in real-time. When the same machine is used for laser etching, the laser moves back and forth very quickly to build up the etched image much like a print head in a desktop printer.
You can see this in the following video showing Christmas decorations that have a laser etched twinkle detail on each laser cut form.

For a detailed walkthrough that helps to unravel the mysteries of the laser cutter, there is a comprehensive Instructables post that is perfect for:

“anyone who is looking to do some laser cutting for the first time, learn a bit more about how lasers work, or just explore the wonderful world of laser cutters”

Stay tuned for more in Ponoko’s series of Back to Basics posts about laser cutting. Up next: Laser Cutting With Ponoko.

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Laser Cutting, Laser Cuttin..."
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Date: Thursday, 10 Jul 2014 03:46

Three new premium wood veneers for your premium products

EDIT: 7/15 – To celebrate the launch of these new premium materials, we’re throwing a design competition with over $2,500 worth of prizes up for grabs!

Left to right: 3.5mm Maple, Cherry & Walnut Veneer

We’ve expanded our material selection in the US with three new premium wood veneers.

These high quality veneers have a wood laminate on each side which is sanded smooth and finished with a clear coat. The premium appearance makes these materials ideal for jewelry, coasters, clocks, or other high end products.

Click on the images below or head over to the materials page to get all the details on our new premium woods.

Premium Veneer MDF – Cherry:

Premium Veneer MDF – Maple:

Premium Veneer MDF – Walnut:

Author: "Dan Devorkin" Tags: "Laser Cut Wood, Laser Cutting, Materials..."
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Date: Monday, 07 Jul 2014 04:01

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #182

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut plywood cake topper from My Madeline Trait.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, coral, castles, maps, butts, and Pi Borg…

Above is a laser cut acrylic ring from Bocken Jewellery.

Above is a laser cut oak plywood reversible puzzle from 3 Star Studio.

Above is a laser cut map of Las Vegas from Carbon Light.

Above is a laser cut brooch from Emma Carlisle.

Above is a laser cut Philippine mahogany plywood Rasberry Pi Case from Engrained Products.

Author: "Sam" Tags: "Art, Electronics + Robotics, Functional ..."
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Date: Saturday, 05 Jul 2014 10:43

Leaves, MC Escher’s Rippled Surface and some sci-fi just for fun

Using a laser cutter to add physical presence to 2D artworks can be really effective, as these recent explorations from Maxime Beauchemin show. Having kicked things off with a rather elegant laser etched ATAT walker, he then moved on to more everyday ephemeral visions.

Pictured above is an acrylic replication of MC Escher’s iconic Rippled Surface print, where Maxime faithfully recreates the layered illusion of water surface, reflected trees and rippled distortion.

Turning to laser cut wood for another project, the delicate structure of a decaying leaf skeleton is revealed.  

Capturing the beauty of nature in challenging, intriguing ways was one of Escher’s specialties and the iconic imagery of his artwork translates into laser cutting very effectively.

See more from Maxime Beauchemin on Thingiverse, where you can download the files for the laser cut leaf, Rippled Surface… and also that ATAT walker we mentioned earlier!

via Thingiverse

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Art, Downloadable, Guy Blashki, Laser Cu..."
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Date: Monday, 30 Jun 2014 04:06

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #181

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut acrylic octopus necklace from C.A.B. fayre.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, teeth, boxes, and Nomi!

Above is a laser cut acrylic sweet tooth necklace from I’m Your Present.

Above is a laser cut velvet (flocked) box from iboxnyc.

Above is a laser cut Baltic birch plywood box from Cedar Street Design.

Above is a laser cut stainless steel Klaus Nomi pendant from Fable and Fury.

Author: "Sam" Tags: "Fashion + Textiles, Functional Art + Obj..."
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Date: Saturday, 28 Jun 2014 09:27

Space saving portable design takes laser cutting on the road

Here is another interesting DIY laser cutter project, this time featuring a novel departure from the standard construction we are used to seeing.

Instead of running within a constrained space, the compact laser cutter has an arm that swings out in a format reminiscent of the RepRap 3D printer.

When the laser cutter is in use the arm opens up to 90 degrees perpendicular to the box and the laser head runs along it.

The main structural elements are made from aluminium extrusions, and there are a few custom CNC milled and 3D printed components to fill in the gaps and connect other off-the-shelf parts.

This looks to be a novel way to build a laser cutter that you can take on the road with you. No more heavy equipment fixed in place in the workshop… just be careful not to set it up on your grandma’s favourite coffee table!

For more info, including a thorough photo essay of the development process behind the fold-out laser cutter, click through to the source.

via DIY fold-out laser cutter

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Hardware, Laser Cutting, di..."
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Date: Wednesday, 25 Jun 2014 00:03

Ponoko is looking for a Community Manager to lead our growing community of product designers

You can’t imagine anything better than working with an innovative industry pioneer, leading an online community of 100,000+ product designers making and selling their custom products online.

You’re a natural communicator who delights customers all day long by delivering a highly empathetic, top quality and timely customer service experience.

You will answer questions regarding our services, help our customers successfully prepare their design files to make their product ideas real, and liaise with our production team to ensure on-time delivery of quality custom products.

This is a great opportunity for a recent communications or arts graduate, designer or maker to immerse into the world of custom product design and online digital making. And to be the ‘customer’s voice’ at our innovative and creative business, renown for over the top customer service.

Ponoko was the first to help designers make and sell their products online, enabling them to make a living from their creativity. We’re one of the world’s leading companies in the online digital making industry, and have been featured in places like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, USA Today, CNN Money, Inc. Magazine (cover), Forbes, Wired, Core77, TechCrunch, Makezine, MIT Technology Review, BBC News and The Economist.

Key Duties
• Manage our community of designers and inspire creative opportunities.
• Answer inbound email (and some phone) questions relating to customer orders, design file preparation, materials and our service generally.
• Interact with our community through various channels – email, social media, in person at events.
• Inspire customers through timely and creative resolution of their enquiries.
• Coordinate order fulfillment and customer happiness with the production team.
• Delight customers with the unexpected, and put a smile on their faces.

Reporting
• Report to the Chief Executive.
• Manage the customer service team.

Key Qualifications
• 2-3 years in customer service / customer success / community management.
• Impeccable verbal and written communication skills.
• Thrives in situations where electronic communication is the primary medium.
• Happy, empathetic, calm and professional when assisting customers.
• Proactive. Detail oriented. Process driven. All three.
• Likes to lead and enjoys working independently.
• Effective at multi­tasking and prioritizing the daily rush of tasks.
• Vector design skills with Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape and Coreldraw.
• Current authorization to work in the United States on a full­time basis.

Other Qualifications We Love But Don’t Require

• Designing for digital fabrication.
• Experience with laser cutting.
• Managing others towards a goal.
• 3D modeling with Solidworks, 123D, Inventor, Blender, SketchUp, Rhino, Meshlab, and Netfabb.

Benefits
• Market salary.
• Unlimited paid time off.
• Run your own ship.
• Employee rates on laser cutting your own stuff.
• Stock options.

To Apply
Introduce yourself and send your resume and examples of your customer interaction work or writing to derek [at] ponoko [dot] com.

Author: "Dan Devorkin" Tags: "Job openings, Ponoko"
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Date: Monday, 23 Jun 2014 04:20

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #180

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut rolling pins from Zuzia Kozerska. Thanks to Mathew Messner for the submission and image courtesy of This Is Colossal.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, bowls, arcs, hearts, and YouFab is back!

Above is a laser cut acrylic Pyrex bowl set necklace from C.A.B. Fayre.

Above is a laser cut illustration board model from 3 Star Studio.

Above is a laser cut acrylic heart necklace from Emandsprout.

YouFab 2014 has launched and you can enter your digital fabrication project until August 1st. Read more at YouFab!

Author: "Sam" Tags: "Functional Art + Objects, Jewellery, Las..."
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Date: Friday, 20 Jun 2014 16:08

Save up to 55%, just for sticking with Prime

As a way to say “thanks” to all our loyal Prime customers, we are offering a lower per-minute rate for laser cutting for every month you are a Prime customer.

Your lower per-minute rate starts the month you sign up for Prime:

Month 1: 32.5% off ($1.35/minute).
Month 2: 33.5% off ($1.33/minute).
Month 3: 34.5% off ($1.33/minute).
Month 4: 36% off ($1.28/minute).
Month 5: 37.5% off ($1.25/minute).
Month 6: 39.5% off ($1.21/minute).
Month 7: 41.5% off ($1.17/minute).
Month 8: 43.5% off ($1.13/minute).
Month 9: 46% off ($1.08/minute).
Month 10: 48.5% off ($1.03/minute).
Month 11: 51.5% off ($0.97/minute).
Months 12+: 55% off ($0.90/minute).

You will automatically receive your new loyalty rate each month you renew your Prime subscription. You will always receive the lowest price as between your loyalty rate and your volume rate.

How to get these lower rates:

  1. Join Prime.
  2. Place your order as normal.
  3. That’s it! Loyalty pricing will automatically be applied to your order every month.

Notes: Lower pricing applies to laser making costs (excluding metal laser and 3D printing), when ordering from Ponoko US and NZ. You’ll lose your entire loyalty status if you quit your Prime account.

If you have any questions about volume pricing don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Author: "Dan Devorkin" Tags: "Laser Cutting, Personal Factory, Ponoko,..."
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Date: Friday, 20 Jun 2014 00:09

Connecting planes with angled precision

Running interesting laser cutter experiments is one of the things that Just Add Sharks does best. In this exploration, they have addressed the question of how to break away from the mortice and tenon joints that have become so familiar in laser cut projects.

By creating a laser cut jig that holds the material at a specific angle, they were able to cut edges that can fit together in a manner that is clean and precise. No more stepped blocks and slots! Here is what the jig looks like:

Much easier to achieve than modifying the axis of the laser cutter itself, this jig provides a firm support to a pre-cut panel, and does not require any other machine modifications. The angle of the cut can be controlled by altering the vertical supports.

“Manually changing the angles like this is tiresome so the next sensible upgrade would be to build an ‘any angle, any material thickness’ jig for the same purpose, but that is a job for another day.”

The Just Add Sharks blog has an overview by Martin Raynsford that talks through a few of the considerations that led to the first successful cut. Having proven that it can be done with standard perpendicular joints, they adjusted a few specs on the jig to produce a icosahedron, pictured below.

via Just Add Sharks

Author: "Guy Blashki" Tags: "Guy Blashki, Hardware, Laser Cut Acrylic..."
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