• Shortcuts : 'n' next unread feed - 'p' previous unread feed • Styles : 1 2

» Publishers, Monetize your RSS feeds with FeedShow:  More infos  (Show/Hide Ads)


   New window
Date: Tuesday, 19 Apr 2011 03:56
'FROM THIS MOMENT' IS AN ARCHIVE AND WILL REMAIN ONLINE FOR NOW.

MY CURRENT BLOG IS:

JUSTINJAMESREED.TUMBLR.COM

FOLLOW ME...
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
   New window
Date: Tuesday, 29 Dec 2009 07:04
Well it seems that I have finally made up my mind to hang up the old blog. This is a decision that has occupied a lot of my thoughts, but honestly does not come from a place of angst. To that effect I feel I owe you, my readers, an explanation.

While I still love the medium of online journaling/blogging/etc., I have come to the conclusion that as far as this specific venue goes (for me), it has reached its end. Blogging has offered an outlet for many of the various thoughts and elements that inspire and occupy me on a daily basis. It has also been responsible for numerous connections within, and exposure to, the greater photographic community. Truly it has been an invaluable resource. So why would I walk away now?

In the greater scheme of things I am looking at this as an opportunity to regroup and return with intensified efforts at a future date. In fact there are already various ideas floating about, and ultimately I am using this as an impetus to push myself even further while exploring those other options in the coming months and years. A lot has changed in the online world over the more than 2 1/2 years since I started From This Moment, and this decision is partly a reflection of that as well.

So, where does that leave us? To all of you who have checked in here over the years I am not going to take the site down. One thing that personally irks me when people do stop publishing is the complete removal of their material. I will probably turn off commenting in a few weeks, just so I can stop moderating it. Other than that it will remain here for the sake of posterity and as a catalog of the various people and sites that I check in on regularly. My personal website has been updated recently, and I have other things planned for it, so check that out too.

Finally, THANK YOU. To those of you who have supported and inspired me to pursue this task, to all of the wonderful people I have met and talked to, THANK YOU. Please continue to write me, say hi, and stay in touch. I wish you all the best.
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 17 Dec 2009 14:02

Class "A" Office Building (2), Malvern, Pennsylvania, 2009
© Justin James Reed

I am hitting the road in just about an hour for a week long photo excursion that will bring me back to the Midwest. Very excited for snow, to feel the cold that only the middle of the country can provoke, some new landscape, and catching up with friends in between. Things are going to be quiet(er) around here until probably into the new year. Have a happy and safe holiday everyone!
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Saturday, 12 Dec 2009 17:00

"Kentucky Fried Chicken, 2009"
© Brian Ulrich
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 10 Dec 2009 05:30

"Diego Rivera (paper, scotch tape, dirt on painted wall)"
© Amy Elkins

For all of you out in CA, make sure you head over to the
Carnegie Art Museum in Oxnard this Saturday to see a new work by the venerable Amy Elkins. Black Is The Day, Black Is The Night, is nothing short of moving. Put together through ongoing conversations with men serving life sentences or on death row, the series itself is great, but the installation she has worked up at the museum should not be missed.

Opening:
Saturday 12/12 . 4 - 7pm
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 10 Dec 2009 05:25
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 08 Dec 2009 23:31
with time to play on the computer in quite awhile!


Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 02 Dec 2009 07:37
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Sunday, 29 Nov 2009 22:30
Really into these wallpaper photographs by Annette Kelm.

'
"
Big Print #6 (Jungle Leaves - cotton twill 1947 design Dorothy Draper, courtesy Schumacher &Co), 2007"
© Annette Kelm


"Big Print #2 (Maui Fern cotton "mainsail cloth" fall 1949 design Dorothy Draper, courtesy Schumacher &Co), 2007"
© Annette Kelm


"Big Print #4 (Fazenda Lily - white Background - cotton fall 1947 design Dorothy Draper, courtesy Schumacher &Co), 2007"
© Annette Kelm
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 11 Nov 2009 16:26
I have been adjusting to the new light, time change, inspirations, and thoughts on photography. Primarily staying engrossed in reading, shooting, listening to music, and working (of course), all of which account for the quiet atmosphere around here as of late. So in order to catch up on a few things that have been swirling about...

• Don't miss The Edge of Vision, by Lyle Rexer. Some recent gems:
"(Frederick) Sommer was also a touchstone. In the climate of American Transcendentalism with a European inflection, the sense of possibility Sommer's photographs opened up is captured in an article written by Henry Holmes Smith: "Some persons will insist on asking 'What is it?' mainly, I think, because this is a photograph, and they have come to expect a photograph to report to us faithfully, directly, and in rather commonplace terms. To answer, 'Spilled paint, plaster, or powder, smashed putty and sprinkled sand' would be to deal with this image as a public report on an ordinary object and would be the most rudimentary and least important aspect of this reality."

Quoting Robert Heineken: "We constantly tend to misuse or misunderstand the term reality in relation to photographs. The photograph itself is the only thing that is real."

"As the chain of signification grows, there is ever greater willingness among photographs (in truth, they have little choice) to examine the medium's arbitrariness, self - sufficiency, and historicity - it's place in the history of human consciousness. Dumb photography is no longer a viable option."

• Long overdue mention of Noel - Rodo - Vankeulen's new body of work, Aura. Really wonderful, and GOLD!



"Aura #30, 2009" From the series Aura
© Noel Rodo - Vankeulen


"Aura #3, 2009" From the series Aura
© Noel Rodo - Vankeulen



"Aura #35, 2009" From the series Aura
© Noel Rodo - Vankeulen

Dreamy Dreamboats.

Chris Jordan's new series is one of the more poignant projects I have seen in quite a long time. Jordan has quite a knack for creating moving commentaries on the environment. I find
Midway: Message from the Gyre a bit more powerful than Running the Numbers, because even though RTN was great, the images themselves did not make the numbers seem any less unfathomable. Midway very quietly and effectively shows a deeply troubling subject.


From the series Midway: Message from the Gyre
© Chris Jordan

Cosmos, Carl Sagan's seminal series from the early 80's is absolutely phenomenal. Besides a whole generation of scientists and dreamers, it seems to have inspired everyone from David Lynch to Boards of Canada.


• And speaking of David Lynch, Grant Willing came up with a very nice image for the new Graphic Intersections project.


© Grant Willing

Finally, some more sweet tunes:
The new CFCF album is incredible!


Make sure to check out Milky Disco 2 if you are into that sort of thing.
Also, new: The Twilight Sad, Kings of Convenience.
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Sunday, 01 Nov 2009 21:07
"Photography has often been criticized for exchanging resemblance for identicalness. In 1841, Rodolphe Topffer was already complaining that the daguerreotype offered "the image of the visible instead of a sign of the invisible." For the picture to be identical would mean that the object had no significance beyond itself. Identicalness, Topffer said, is the indirect and therefore verifiable product of the daguerreotype process, whereas resemblance is the freely expressive sign of something other than the image. Truthfulness, then, is to be found not in the identical picture but in the picture which gives a resemblance. This traditional distinction shows the dilemma of photography, which was not permitted to depict what it could depict, but was unable to depict what people demanded of it."

- Hubertus von Amelunxen, excerpt from A New History of Photography.
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 29 Oct 2009 02:37


Just got through looking at my freshly arrived copy of Mitch Epstein's most recent effort, American Power. Initial thoughts are that the scope of the project is huge, extremely ambitious, and every single photograph is beautifully executed.


"Lake Mead National Park, Nevada 2007" . From the series American Power
© Mitch Epstein

Very excited to hear him speak at PPAC next Thursday evening right here in Philly. I am specifically looking forward to hearing how he sees the seemingly disparate photographs in the project relate to one another, and of course his photo thoughts in general.

* For those of you who can't make it to the lecture
check out this great interview with him here (video).


"Ocean Warwick, Dauphine Island, Alabama 2005
" . From the series American Power
© Mitch Epstein


"Rancho Seco ­Nuclear Power Plant, ­Herald, California, 2005
" . From the series American Power
© Mitch Epstein
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 23 Oct 2009 01:04
"We feel throughout the history of photography a chafing at its limits, an impatience with mere visuality, and a wish for some more intimate expression of the world's relation - but one somehow made available through the eyes. This makes the photographer into a strange kind of artist, at least in the modernist sense - part showman, part magician, part stage manager. The photographer does not "create" but harnesses and directs. The photograph itself is a piece of performance art, and the performer is light - passing through and encountering things in the world."

- Lyle Rexer, excerpt from The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 22 Oct 2009 23:46
Definitely going to catch this film when it makes its way to Philly in a few weeks. I mean come on, a documentary about malls accompanied by a soundtrack by Air, what more could one really ask for?


Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 15 Oct 2009 15:30
Being swamped with work lately I have been very lucky to have found some really great music to carry me through.



"Seek Magic" by Memory Tapes is close to the best album I have ever heard, yes ever. It made it's way into daily rotation immediately, and requires at least one or two plays per day. Absolutely brilliant and beautiful, it is crafted by the front man of one of my favorite bands from Philadelphia, Hail Social. And although it pains me to say it, this solo effort is leaps and bounds beyond his earlier work as part of that band. So take a listen already!

* Two other incarnations, Memory Cassette &
Weird Tapes, are very good as well, and definitely worth a spin.

Some other current picks:
Kid Cudi - Man on the Moon: End of the Day (anyone who can drop blogging and hand sanitizer within a sentence of each other is undeniably awesome)
Foals - Antidote
Air - Love 2
Julian Plenti - Julian Plenti is... Skyscraper
Passion Pit - Manners
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Working   New window
Date: Tuesday, 13 Oct 2009 14:28

"Akron, Pennsylvania" . 2009 . From the series Paradise
© Justin James Reed
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 12 Oct 2009 11:18

"Tree Study, Forest of
Fontainebleau, ca. 1856"
© Gustave Le Gray


"Fontainebleau, France, 2007"
© Alec Soth

Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 09 Oct 2009 16:10
Behind health care reform, teaching rights are probably the next closest political issue to my heart, and to be honest they are intricately related in many ways. Having been an adjunct teacher at 4 different colleges (so far) I have been exposed to a number of different systems and environments. The discrepancy between pay rates, hours, etc. is quite startling at times, but overall I, like most adjuncts, feel very lucky to be teaching at all. That being said there are a number of deeper issues that still trouble me.

At the top of this list is the fact that most schools are no longer hiring full time faculty, instead they are relying on the large crop of eager adjuncts to fill in the gaps. This is not only detrimental to the students and institutions as a whole (except financially) but also to any future possibility of stability and a living wage for many teachers.

"In Vermont, 100 percent of the state's community college faculty are adjuncts, or part-time teachers. Nationwide, 44 percent of college and university faculty are now classified as part-time. Of these, fewer than 20 percent receive any health benefits or contributions to retirement. This is not just an issue at community colleges, however. At New York University, for instance, 80 percent of the faculty are classified as contingent, meaning they are working on short-term contracts as adjuncts or graduate employees.

About a third of adjunct faculty are "part-time employees" in name only. Across the country, professors known as "freeway flyers" or "roads scholars" are forced to teach full time by working part time at more than one institution just to gain an adequate income."

This is why I am so relieved to see legislation being put through the House of Representatives that could potentially address this issue. The President of the AFT recently asked that the statement below be included in the final version of a bill addressing another troubling problem of more financial aid being shifted toward private banks away from the colleges themselves.

" The AFT believes that academic staffing is a critical component of student success, yet it is too often overlooked in discussions about how to improve our institutions of higher education. The lack of attention paid to the loss of full-time tenured faculty positions, and the overwhelming growth of poorly paid part-time faculty, has been taking a toll on higher education for many years. Today, almost three out of four undergraduate instructors are contingent rather than permanent full-time faculty members-contingent faculty members teach a majority of the nation's undergraduate courses. Unless we take steps to reverse course, this trend will greatly impair the ability of our colleges and universities to reach the national goals Congress has set for them. In fact, a growing body of research shows the correlation between the declining investment in faculty and the increasing problems with student persistence, transfer and completion. [snip]
Specifically, we believe it is essential that programs designed to improve persistence and completion, especially those targeted at community colleges, should include provisions that encourage institutions to strengthen their instructional workforce by creating additional full-time faculty positions or providing more stability and equitable compensation for part-time faculty. Such investments in the frontline educators-those most responsible for helping students succeed-are fundamental to increasing persistence and completion rates, and improving the quality of education at our nation's two- and four-year colleges and universities."
If you are a teacher, student, or anyone at all who cares about this issue, please take the time to go to the following site and petition your Senators. The site calls for more aggressive language, which I am whole heartily behind, but no matter what it would be great to get this ball rolling.

As far as I am concerned education should be the core issue. It is the only sure thing that can fundamentally change the dynamic of a society for the better. I am always saddened when I see great teachers being discouraged and disheartened because of the current lack of support. Please take a moment to help change this.
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 06 Oct 2009 12:46
Very pleased to be included in this upcoming exhibition featuring artists, curators, and writers associated with Philadelphia put together by my friend Corey Antis. The name, 1.5 Million, is in reference to the current population of Philadelphia and is inspired by a 1970 exhibition by Lucy Lippard. Focusing on the space between imagination and practice, the exhibition will feature proposals for works that could - but don’t necessarily - exist. As in the original show, each proposal will be represented by one index card.

1.5 Million is:

Stefan Abrams, Amy Adams, Anita Allyn, Joshua Aster, Leah Bailis, Tim Belknap, Jeremy Boyle, Adam Blumberg, Frank Bramblett, Kimberly Brandt, Gerard Brown, Ian Burns, Mark Campbell, Anthony Campuzano, Sheryl Conkelton, Roderick Coover, Andrew Criss, Daniel Cummings, Kevin Curran, Micah Danges, Rachel Dobkin, Philip Glahn, Adam Grossi, Michael Grothusen, Walsh Hansen, Austin Heitzman, Jane Irish, Ianthe Jackson, James Johnson, Rini Yun Keagy, Thad Kellstadt, Karen Kirchhoff, Nicholas Kripal, Naima Lowe, Jacque Liu, Margo Margolis, Ian Markiewicz, Ryan McCartney, Jesse McLean, Dustin Metz, Chad Muthard, Eileen Neff, Anna Neighbor, Alex Paik, Nick Paparone, Richard Purcell, Pete Rangel, Justin James Reed, Isaac Resnikoff, Maha Saab, Rebecca Saylor Sack, Martha Savery, Dan Schank, Anne Seidman, Matthew Sepielli, Jennie Shanker, Mark Shetabi, Brandon Som, Dustin Sparks, Chad States, Jeffrey Stockbridge, Mark Stricker, Jim Strong, Andrew Suggs, Josh Tonies, Christopher Ulivo, Thomas Vance, Eva Wylie, Nami Yamamoto, Mauro Zamora

Exhibition Dates: October 7 – October 17, 2009

OPENING RECEPTION: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 7:00-9:00 PM

Gallery Hours: Visitors welcome Wednesday to Saturday, 10 am – 5 pm

Stella Elkins Tyler Galleries
Tyler School of Art
12th and Norris Streets
Lower Level South, B02
Philadelphia, PA 19122
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
The POC   New window
Date: Thursday, 01 Oct 2009 02:58


As alluded to in my recent post about Charles Freger and Bill Sullivan's upcoming exhibition at Caption Gallery (opening tomorrow night), there is something new in the air.

POC (Piece of Cake) has come to our shores from Europe. The excellent group of photographers who currently make up their rosters are now joined by a budding network here, in North America. This appears to be an evolution of the networking that began in part through photo blogs, and in the forging of deeper connections both online and in real time. Most importantly though this represents the ongoing sharing of ideas and work in the photography community, and a concerted effort to bring us collectively closer. For me it is especially exciting to see the diverse nature of work being made in Europe, work that would be difficult to come across without this kind of communal sharing. These reasons, and for what the future potentially holds, make me extremely honored to be involved. Stay tuned!
Author: "Justin@JustinJamesReed.com (Justin)"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Next page
» You can also retrieve older items : Read
» © All content and copyrights belong to their respective authors.«
» © FeedShow - Online RSS Feeds Reader