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Date: Friday, 29 Aug 2014 07:00
Sometimes when things get dangerous, people like to take the law into their own hands. Find out how in this episode. Slow dialog: 1:15 Explanations: 3:39 Fast dialog: 18:24 Jim: Did you hear what happened to the Romeros? Helene: No, what? Jim: They went on vacation for a week and vandals broke a couple of windows in the back of their house and tagged their living room walls with graffiti. Helene: That’s terrible! There are always punks who like to egg houses in this neighborhood for fun, but this is much more serious. Jim: I think things are getting out of hand. Every week or two, we hear of incidents of people having their tires slashed or their cars keyed. Helene: And the Jamisons had their flowerbeds trampled and a small fire set on their lawn three weeks ago. This neighborhood is really going downhill. Jim: What should we do about it? Helene: What do you mean? Jim: I think we should start patrolling the streets at night. Helene: You mean organize a neighborhood watch? Wouldn’t that be dangerous? Jim: If you’re worried, when you see something suspicious, call the police. Helene: And you think they’ll come in time to catch them? The police aren’t known for quick response times in this neighborhood. Jim: Then we’ll go after them ourselves. Helene: You mean be vigilantes? I’m not sure that would be wise. Jim: Why not? If Clint Eastwood can do it, so can I. Go ahead, punk, make my day! Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
Attached Media: audio/mpeg (24 566 ko)
Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Wednesday, 27 Aug 2014 07:00
Topics: Famous Songs – “If I Had a Hammer”; How to Become a Social Worker; to dismantle versus to disassemble; guilt versus blame; to cross the great divide Words: folk song tune labor rights reasonable civil rights movement to hammer out justice hospice mental illness behavioral problem psychological practicum supervised experience to dismantle to disassemble guilt blame to cross the great divide
Attached Media: audio/mpeg (41 981 ko)
Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Monday, 25 Aug 2014 07:00
Learn how to talk about putting things in order in this episode. Slow dialog: 1:22 Explanations: 3:22 Fast dialog: 15:43 Patrick: Okay, your first task is to put all of these files in order. Maya: Wow, there must be hundreds of files in this storeroom. How am I supposed to organize them? Patrick: Create a basic filing system. Put things in sequence. If they’re labeled with dates, put them in chronological order. If they’re labeled with names, put them in alphabetical order by last name. Maya: Okay, but what about this file? It’s labeled with a four-digit number, but it’s not a date. Patrick: Those are case numbers. Put those in ascending or descending numeric order, whichever makes sense. Maya: But this file has letters followed by numbers. Patrick: Then put those in alphanumeric order, first by letter and then by number. Simple, right? Maya: Yeah, but have you ever considered a more random filing system, something that embraces chaos? Patrick: No, I haven’t. If I wanted chaos, I’d just go home to my 11 children! Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Friday, 22 Aug 2014 07:00
What sort of things do you like on your hamburgers and hot dogs? Learn about some delicious (or disgusting) possibilities in this episode. Slow dialog: 1:34 Explanations: 3:09 Fast dialog: 16:16 Orlando: Hand me that Worcestershire sauce. Janine: Here. You’re not putting that on your burger, are you? Orlando: No, I’m using it for my hot dog. Janine: Wait. You’ve put ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, and barbecue sauce on your burger, and now you’re going to put Worcestershire sauce on your hot dog? Orlando: Sure, you’ve got to have Worcestershire sauce on your hot dog. Janine: No, I don’t. I don’t know anybody else who puts Worcestershire sauce on their hot dogs. Orlando: You’re missing out. I just need to add a little steak sauce, horseradish, tartar sauce, and a dab of chili sauce and this hot dog is ready to eat. Janine: That sounds disgusting! Is there anything you won’t put on your food? Orlando: On this food? Maybe maple syrup. Janine: What?! You’re the one missing out. Hand me that syrup. Orlando: That is truly revolting! Janine: To each his own. Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Wednesday, 20 Aug 2014 07:00
Topics: The Roaring Twenties; The Empire State Building; Indians (Asians) versus Indians (indigenous peoples); to blow up versus to explode; staging ground Words: decade booming to be independent roaring invention flapper corset jazz to improvise to become established story observatory Indian (Asian) Indian to blow up to explode staging ground
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Monday, 18 Aug 2014 07:00
Getting married is a serious step in one’s life. Learn about people who get married young in this episode. Slow dialog: 1:19 Explanations: 3:10 Fast dialog: 16:31 Irene: Damon and his girlfriend just got engaged. They’re planning on getting married this summer. Ken: They’re too young! Marrying young poses all kinds of problems. Irene: Such as? Ken: Such as the two of them lacking maturity. They may think it’s fun to play house right now, but they’re not prepared to face the realities and responsibilities of matrimony. Irene: I think you’re selling them short. They’ve been dating for two years and there’s no ideal age for marriage. Ken: Yes, but we all know that marrying young will doom them to a life of regrets. Irene: That’s a bit harsh, don’t you think? A lot of people who marry young have successful marriages. I like the idea of growing old with your spouse. You can reach many of life’s milestones together. Ken: Like reaching the legal drinking age? Irene: Don’t be facetious. Getting married will give them stability and someone to lean on. I think they’ll be great as a married couple. Ken: Well, I hope they beat the odds…or at least learn a lot for their second marriages. Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Friday, 15 Aug 2014 07:00
Do you think the personal information you put on the Internet can be kept private? Think again! Listen to this episode to find out what you should do to protect yourself. Slow Dialog: 1:40 Explanation: 4:09 Fast Dialog: 17:31 Lorenzo: I wouldn’t post all of those photos on social media sites. Pamela: Why not? Only my friends and family are going to see them. Lorenzo: I wouldn’t be so sure. And I wouldn’t post all of that personal data either or divulge personal information. You don’t know who may gain access to your page. Pamela: There are privacy safeguards on this website. I can block anyone I don’t know from getting access, so no one can see what I post without permission. Lorenzo: Well, the people who run the website itself have access. They could track what you do and what you post, and extract data from your page to sell to third-party buyers. Pamela: No, they can’t do that. I’d know if they were doing that. Lorenzo: How? Pamela: Well… Lorenzo: As I said, that’s happening as we speak. And those are the legitimate uses of your information. Hackers can gain access, too, with malicious intent. They can do a lot of damage with the personal data you’ve posted. Pamela: So, what should I do? Lorenzo: Take down most of your posts and photos, at least the ones you wouldn’t want everyone to see. Pamela: But that would mean no one would know anything about me. Worse yet, it would mean having a really boring page. Lorenzo: It’s either risk being boring or risk an invasion of your privacy. Pamela: Wow, what a dilemma! Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Wednesday, 13 Aug 2014 07:00
Topics: American Presidents – George H. W. Bush; “architects let rip with a wave of ambitious and beautifully crafted buildings”; to keep (someone) out of (one’s) hair; pronouncing dead versus debt Words: to appoint ambassador liaison running mate foreign affairs to invade to denounce to stockpile coalition embargo recession domestic architect to let rip a wave of ambitious crafted to keep (someone) out of (one’s) hair
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Monday, 11 Aug 2014 07:00
Busy, busy, busy! There’s always some problem that needs solving at work. Find out how to talk about it in English in this episode. Slow Dialog: 1:13 Explanation: 3:10 Fast Dialog: 15:05 Teresa: Hey, where are you going? We have a meeting in 10 minutes. Adrian: I’m sorry. I’m going to have to postpone. I’m in the middle of putting out fires and I’ve had to clear my schedule to deal with the latest crisis. Teresa: Can I help? Adrian: I wish you could. With the new layoffs, I feel like I’m being pulled in several directions at once. As soon as I feel like I’m making headway with one problem, I get another thrown at me. Teresa: I know exactly what you mean. I always feel like it’s crunch time around here because we’re so shorthanded. Adrian: I’m so tired of everything being urgent all the time and needing attention ASAP. I long for the days when projects had timelines and people followed them. I’ve got to go. Teresa: Hey, when are we going to have that meeting? Adrian: As soon as things quiet down. Teresa: When will that be? Adrian: I’ll let you know as soon as the latest disaster has been averted. Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Friday, 08 Aug 2014 07:00
Are you an acting genius? If not, you can learn how to act by listening to this episode, or at least improve your English. Slow Dialog: 1:28 Explanations: 3:30 Fast Dialog: 17:27 Richard: It’s 6:30 a.m. on Saturday morning. Why are you banging those pots and pans? Elizabeth: I have an audition coming up and I’m rehearsing. Richard: By banging pots and pans? Elizabeth: I’m up for a part as a 1950s housewife. I need to learn my lines and be prepared to improvise. That’s why I’m cooking you a 10-course breakfast. I want to practice staying in character. Richard: I don’t really want a 10-course breakfast, but if it helps you with your audition… Elizabeth: It will. I have to stretch my acting chops and really get into the head of the character. Richard: Right. Whatever you say. Elizabeth: “Yes, dear. Your breakfast will be ready and waiting when you want it.” Did I project enough? Did I emote enough? Richard: You were great. What kind of acting job is this? Elizabeth: It’s a small one. Richard: In a film? Elizabeth: No. Richard: In a TV show? Elizabeth: Not exactly. Richard: What is it? Elizabeth: It’s a commercial. It’s only a bit part, but you know what they say: There are no small parts, only small actors! Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Wednesday, 06 Aug 2014 07:00
Topics: Movies: Singin’ in the Rain; Famous Authors – Clare Booth Luce; to exchange versus to change versus to switch; to walk off; margin Words: subtitles talkie film studio rumor chorus girl technical problem to abandon private school to abuse correspondent to convert ambassador to exchange to change to switch to walk off margin
Attached Media: audio/mpeg (41 227 ko)
Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Monday, 04 Aug 2014 07:00
It’s really not complicated, guys: Don’t drink and drive. Learn what happens when you do in this episode. Slow Dialog: 1:28 Explanations: 3:30 Fast Dialog: 17:27 Susan: Hey, Jack, you’re an attorney. Do you know anything about DUIs? Jack: Sure, I’ve handled a few DUI cases. Susan: I was just wondering about the penalties for a DUI. Jack: Well, if it’s a first offense, you’ll be fined and may be placed on probation. You’ll need to attend DUI school, and your license will be restricted, which means you can only drive to and from work and to and from DUI school. Susan: That sounds serious, but what if it’s not your first offense? Jack: Then the penalties get even more serious. With your second offense, you’ll probably do mandatory jail time, anywhere from 96 hours to a year, depending on the circumstances. Your driver’s license will be suspended, and you’ll be placed on probation for several years. Susan: Those are some severe penalties. But what if you already have two DUIs? Jack: Then you’ll get several months in jail, at least. Your license will be revoked and you may be required to go into an alcohol treatment program. Why are you asking me all of these questions? You’re not in trouble, are you? Susan: No, I’m not. I just met a guy and I really like him, but I think he just got his third DUI. Jack: If that isn’t deterrent enough, you may think about what kind of relationship you can have with him – from behind bars! Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Friday, 01 Aug 2014 07:00
College can drive you crazy, but so can psychologists. Learn about how many problems you may have in this episode. Slow dialog: 1:38 Explanations: 4:10 Fast dialog: 20:25 Dr. Miao: At Berthiaume College, we take mental health issues very seriously. That’s why we have so many mental health services on campus. Dean: Such as? Dr. Miao: Well, for example, there is a meeting tonight of our support group for anorexics and bulimics. Tomorrow night, I’ll be speaking to a group of students about depression to make them aware of the warning signs. Dean: Those are very important issues. Dr. Miao: Yes, they are. In this student health center, we see cases ranging from social anxiety disorder to schizophrenia. In addition to serious mental disorders, college students are at risk of developing many types of antisocial behaviors resulting from the pressures of college and the stress of being on their own. Dean: I know what you mean. One of my roommates copes with stress by binge drinking. My other roommate has become obsessive-compulsive. You should see how clean our apartment is. Dr. Miao: And you? How have you been dealing with the stress? Dean: Me? I think I’m the only well-adjusted one in the group. Dr. Miao: Are you sure? You seem to have developed a nervous habit of pulling your hairs out one at a time. Dean: What?! No, I haven’t. Dr. Miao: Denying you have a problem is often a sign that you have a problem. Dean: That’s crazy! Dr. Miao: Shh! We don’t use the c-word here. Come with me. Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Wednesday, 30 Jul 2014 07:00
Topics: The Basics of Basketball; Flea Markets; grass versus herb; delectable versus palatable; be my guest Words: offense defense to substitute to block to foul to dribble flea collectable antique second hand bargain to negotiate grass herb delectable palatable be my guest
Attached Media: audio/mpeg (40 466 ko)
Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Monday, 28 Jul 2014 07:00
Ladies and mental men – I mean, “Ladies and gentlemen, this episode is all about making herbal – I mean, verbal – mistakes.” Slow dialog: 1:24 Explanations: 3:41 Fast dialog: 18:57 Omar: Ha ha. Faith: What’s so funny? Omar: I’m editing Paul’s speech so that it can be posted on our website, but I didn’t realize how many verbal mistakes he made. Faith: Were there a lot? Omar: Yeah, he mispronounced the last name of the manager in charge of new products, for one. He also stumbled over the name of the new products. Faith: I did notice that he had a few problems with delivery. Omar: That’s putting it lightly. He stuttered when trying to list the products’ features. It’s true that some of the verbiage was written like tongue twisters, but I thought he would have had it down cold by now. Faith: I noticed he made a few slips of the tongue, but I didn’t notice all that. I guess I wasn’t listening too closely. But what were you laughing about when I walked in? Omar: Paul made a Freudian slip. Instead of saying that “innovation is our bread and butter,” he said that it was our “bed and butter.” Maybe that’s why he had so many flubs. His mind was elsewhere. Faith: I think you’ll have plenty of material for a blooper reel. Omar: That’s true. In fact, if this were a film, I’d have more outtakes than usable footage! Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Friday, 25 Jul 2014 07:00
Losing important documents when you’re traveling can be a real problem. Learn more in this episode. Slow dialog: 1:24 Explanations: 3:37 Fast dialog: 18:16 Nina: Oh, my God! I can’t find my passport. I never should have put it in my purse. I’m sure a pickpocket took it. Serge: Calm down. Maybe you just misplaced it. Let’s turn out all of your pockets and search for it before we panic. Nina: I know it’s gone. I know it! Flag down the police. We have to file a police report. Serge: If your passport has been stolen, we need to find the U.S. embassy. Nina: We’re supposed to continue on to the next country on our tour tomorrow. We’re going to get left behind! Serge: Let’s not get ahead of ourselves. If we need to find a U.S. embassy and apply for a temporary passport, we’ll do that. Nina: It’s Saturday! We won’t get any help at the embassy until Monday. We’ll be stuck here. Serge: It’ll take as long as it takes. Now, let’s search through all of your belongings before we do anything else. Nina: I just thought of something. Serge: What? Nina: I think I may have left it in the hotel room. Serge: You think you may have left it in the hotel room. Nina: Isn’t that good news? All that worry for nothing. Serge: Let’s not count our chickens. You might have another inspiration. Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 07:00
Topics: American Musicals and Movies: Grease; Workers’ Compensation Laws; whirl versus swirl versus eddy; to be curious versus to wonder; beloved Words: senior year reputation rebel good girl to exaggerate workers compensation to sue federal to put a limit on disability industry miner whirl swirl eddy to be curious to wonder beloved
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Monday, 21 Jul 2014 07:00
It’s never too early to start preparing yourself for your children’s teenage years – or is it? Find out in this episode. Slow dialog: 1:31 Explanations: 3:41 Fast dialog: 18:34 Carl: Hi Marla, I’m really surprised to see you here. I didn’t know you had kids attending this high school. Marla: I don’t – not yet. I heard about this meeting and decided to attend. It’s best to be ready for those teenage years, don’t you think? Carl: Sure. Marla: I heard that the principal is going to talk about different ways to handle our teenagers as they start asserting their independence. I want to be prepared. Carl: That makes sense, I guess. Marla: I mean, more and more teenagers are rebelling by getting tattoos and piercings and experimenting with drugs. Carl: You’ve clearly done a lot of thinking about this. Marla: I’ve read a few books on the topic, about kids having to deal with peer pressure. It’s my job as a parent to set boundaries and be stricter if it’s called for and ease up when my child needs space. Carl: That’s all very insightful, but you have some time before all that comes into play, right? Marla: My little Lucas is already four years old. Who knows when he might start hanging out with the wrong crowd and being led astray. A parent has to be vigilant. Carl: Right. Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
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Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Friday, 18 Jul 2014 07:00
Are you ready for an adventure? Learn all about taking a ride on the wild side in this episode. Slow dialog: 1:32 Explanations: 3:21 Fast dialog: 16:18 Claudia: When you invited me to go for a drive, this wasn’t what I pictured. Jae: You’re about to have the ride of your life. Get in and I’ll strap you in. Claudia: What is this thing? Jae: It’s an off-road vehicle. Haven’t you seen one before? It has four-wheel drive and can travel on any terrain. Claudia: When you say “any terrain,” what exactly do you mean? Jae: With this baby, we can drive on sand, gravel, mud, and even snow. Claudia: You mean you intend to take me driving on sand and gravel? Jae: Yeah, just wait until we start spinning and skidding. You’re going to love it. You’d better put on this crash helmet – just in case. Claudia: I was picturing a drive in the country. Jae: But this is much more exciting, right? Claudia: I don’t know… Jae: Come on. If you’re lucky, I’ll take you mudding next weekend. Claudia: Whoopee. Script by Dr. Lucy Tse
Attached Media: audio/mpeg (21 615 ko)
Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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Date: Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 07:00
Topics: The Scottsboro Boys Trial; The Grammy Awards; so versus too; to bash; to whip the crowd into a frenzy Words: segregated racism to witness to rape verdict jury to testify to be paroled to pardon album to release to nominate so too to bash to whip the crowd into a frenzy
Attached Media: audio/mpeg (18 593 ko)
Author: "Center for Educational Development"
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