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Date: Saturday, 19 Apr 2014 22:35
The past week has been exhilarating and exhausting for our Kubuntu crew. I'm sure the other *buntu teams were working just as hard. Not just packaging, because that goes on all the time, though not at this intense pace. But the attention to detail, the testing, polishing, patching, discussion with developers to get those patches upstream, coordination with Debian, cleaning up copyright files, man pages and other documentation, making screen shots, our user docs and new website, more testing, more polish.... it was truly an amazing effort.

I used `ubuntu-bug` from the cli more than I ever have before, testing out the betas. It was an amazing experience to file the bug, and then see it fixed within the day! This happened again and again. The entire Ubuntu ecosystem really works well together. My thanks to those developers who read and respond to those bug reports.

What I love about Kubuntu is how everyone pitches in. All of us try to maintain balance in our lives, so that there is time for leisure and enrichment, along with work. Also, the work is fun, because the team enjoys one another, posting fun links, joking around, but continuing to work away on our todo lists. Even those who didn't have time for packaging, often stopped by the devel channel to find out what needed testing. It all helped!

Since I'm not a devel, all this was inspiring rather than exhausting. So I had the time and energy to spend time helping out folks with questions and trouble in #kubuntu and #kde. That felt great! We were able to answer most of the questions, and overcome most of the difficulties.

One issue that came up quite a few times in the last couple of days, was PPAs. On a clean install, of course all old PPAs are blown away. On an upgrade, however, they can linger and cause lots of perplexing problems. Official PPAs like backports are fine, but specialty ones should be removed before upgrading. If you need them, you can always re-add after the upgrade. For the same reason, unpin any packages you have pinned.

It is really fabulous to be able to present the latest KDE software into our Kubuntu LTS. This will give us the freedom to try out the newest stuff from KDE based on the sparkly new Frameworks, Plasma Next and so forth, in our next release. So, our users will be able to use software supported for five years if they want, while also having the option to install 14.10 (if all goes well) and check out the newest.
Author: "Valorie Zimmerman"
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Date: Saturday, 19 Apr 2014 17:57

UbuconLA is happy to announce that Canonical and the Ubuntu Community will be sponsors in this version 2014.

Also, the Ubuntu Community will be present in the event with members from Spain, India, Uruguay, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru, Colombia, giving talks and workshops… the perfect place to learn a lot about Linux, Ubuntu ,Community, all in this amazing event.

 

 

You can find more information about the UbuconLA in the official site and wikipage


Author: "sergiomeneses"
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Date: Saturday, 19 Apr 2014 17:31

Today, tweaking the Bootstrap_Walker class used by Melany for another project, I discovered an interesting issue with the title attribute.

Melany allows you to prepend a menu item with an icon coming from the Glyphicon set included in Twitter Bootstrap in a very easy way: just put the glyphicon name in the menu item’s title attribute field and let the Melany do the rest. See an example in the following image:

How to prepend icons to menu items

How to prepend icons to menu items

So, what’s the problem? Well, if you try to define a true title attribute, it won’t work, because the Bootstrap_Walker handles this attribute as if it were an icon. Let me do an example. If you want to set the title attribute to “This link opens in a new tab”, the resulting markup is:

<a href="[menu_item_url]"><span class="glyphicon This link opens in a new tab"></span>&nbsp;[navigation_label]</a>

Of course, you wanted something like this:

<a href="[menu_item_url]" title="This link opens in a new tab">[navigation_label]</a>

I solved this issue with a simple check to see if the word glyphicon is in the title attribute, so you can now use this real attribute without problems. The fix is already in the 1.1.0-dev version, but will soon be released in the 1.0.5 series too.

I hope this has not caused you too many hassles.

Oh, do you know Melany 1.1.0 Alpha2 has been released? Check it out!

Author: "Mattia “deshack” Migliorini"
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Date: Saturday, 19 Apr 2014 14:04

After some last minute critical fixes and ISO respins by the release team (thanks again Infinity, we owe you and the rest of the release team a beer), the Mythbuntu team is proud to announce we have removed our socks (see relevant post) and released Mythbuntu 14.04 LTS. This is the Mythbuntu team's second LTS release and is supported until shortly after the 16.04 release.

With this release, we are providing mirroring on sponsored mirrors and torrents. It is very important to note that this release is only compatible with MythTV 0.27 systems. The MythTV component of previous Mythbuntu releases can be be upgraded to a compatible MythTV version by using the Mythbuntu Repos. For a more detailed explanation, see here.

You can get the Mythbuntu 14.04 ISO from our downloads page.

Highlights

  • MythTV 0.27 (2:0.27.0+fixes.20140324.8ee257c-0ubuntu3)
  • This is our second LTS release (the first being 12.04). See this page for more info.

Underlying system

  • Underlying Ubuntu updates are found here

MythTV

  • Recent snapshot of the MythTV 0.27 release is included (see 0.27 Release Notes)
  • Mythbuntu theme fixes

We appreciated all comments and would love to hear what you think. Please make comments to our mailing list, on the forums (with a tag indicating that this is from 14.04 or trusty), or in #ubuntu-mythtv on Freenode. As previously, if you encounter any issues with anything in this release, please file a bug using the Ubuntu bug tool (ubuntu-bug PACKAGENAME) which automatically collects logs and other important system information, or if that is not possible, directly open a ticket on Launchpad (http://bugs.launchpad.net/mythbuntu/14.04/).

Known issues

  • Upgraders should hold off until our first point (14.04.1) coming this summer. (See bugs #1307546 )
  • Don't select VNC during install. It can be activated later. (Bug #1309752)
  • If you are upgrading and want to use the HTTP Live Streaming you need to create a Streaming storage group
Author: "Thomas Mashos"
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Date: Saturday, 19 Apr 2014 12:18

Hi,

Two days ago, the entire world has celebrated the release of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS and the other official flavours of Ubuntu.

Ubuntu GNOME Team has received many Emails and Posts on our Social Media Channels about the very same question/issue.

“Why the system information is showing Ubuntu 13.10 instead of Ubuntu 14.04″?!

Same question is being asked daily even before the final release of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04.

Ubuntu GNOME Team is asking everyone to please read the release notes of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS before downloading or upgrading to Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS.

This is actually a must-do step with any new release/version of any Operating System/Software in the world and to be more specific here, it is a must-do step every time Ubuntu and its official flavours announce a new release every 6 months.

Why reading the release notes is very important?
The answer is very simple: because the release notes will explain everything about the new release and above all, show the known issues for every new release that all users must be aware of before anything else.

Sorry for the inconvenience
Ubuntu GNOME Team would like to apologize if we caused any kind of confusion and/or headache to the users of Ubuntu GNOME. Our Developers are working on the known issues, specially this problem:

System Details shows Ubuntu 13.10 instead of 14.04

A Workaround
Meanwhile, you can check and verify which release/version of Ubuntu GNOME you’re using by following these steps:

How can I find the version of Ubuntu that is installed?

Thank you!
As always, thank you for choosing and using Ubuntu GNOME and thanks for reading this very important note. Please keep that in mind with each and every release, you do need to read the release notes. This will save your time and save the trouble for you and for everyone else.

Enjoy and have fun with Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS

Ali/amjjawad
On behalf of Ubuntu GNOME Team

Author: "Ali Linx"
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Date: Saturday, 19 Apr 2014 09:56
We had the Trusty Tahr Release Party today at the University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh (ULAB), Dhaka. It was the official Ubuntu 12.04 release party of Ubuntu Bangladesh LoCo team in cooperation with “ULAB Computer Programming Club”. This time, we did it within two days of … Continue reading
Author: "Adnan"
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Date: Saturday, 19 Apr 2014 00:13

I gave a talk this year at PyCon 2014, about one of my favorite subjects: Hy. Many of my regular readers will have no doubt explored Hy's thriving GitHub org, played with try-hy, or even installed it locally by pip installing it. I was lucky enough to be able to attend PyCon on behalf of Sunlight, with a solid contingint of my colleagues. We put together a writeup on the Sunlight blog if anyone was interested in our favorite talks.

Tons of really amazing questions, and such an amazingly warm reception from so many of my peers throughout this year's PyCon. Thank you so much to everyone that attended the talk. As always, you should Fork Hy on GitHub, follow @hylang on the twitters, and send in any bugs you find!

Hopefully I'll be able to put my talk up in blog-post form soon, but until then feel free to look over the slides or just watch the talk.

An extra shout-out to @akaptur for hacking on Hy during the sprints, and giving the exception system quite the workthrough. Thanks, Allison!

Author: "Paul Tagliamonte"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 20:12

For some time I’ve been wanting to run ubuntu-desktop and others, remotely, in containers, using spice. Historically vnc has been the best way to do remote desktops, but spice should provide a far better experience. Unfortunately, Xspice has always failed for me, most recently segfaulting on startup. But fortunately, this is fixed in git, and I’m told a new release may be coming soon. While waiting for the new release (0.12.7?), I pushed a package based on git HEAD to ppa:serge-hallyn/virt.

You can create a container to test this with as follows:

lxc-create -t download -n desk1 -- -d ubuntu -r trusty -a amd64
lxc-start -n desk1 -d
lxc-attach -n desk1

Then inside that container shell,

add-apt-repository ppa:serge-hallyn/virt
apt-get update
apt-get install xserver-xspice ubuntu-desktop

ubuntu-desktop can take awhile to install. You can simply install fvwm and xterm if you want a quicker test. Once that’s all one, copy the xspice configuration file into your home directory, uncompress it, set the SpiceDisableTicketing option (or configure a password), and use the config file to configure an Xorg session:

cp /usr/share/doc/xserver-xspice/spiceqxl.xorg.conf.example.gz /root
cd /root
gunzip spiceqxl.xorg.conf.example.gz
cat >> spiceqxl.xorg.conf.example.gz << EOF
Option "SpiceDisableTicketing" "1"
EOF
/usr/bin/Xorg -config /root/spiceqxl.xorg.conf.example :2 &

Now fire up unity, xterm, or fvwm:

DISPLAY=:2 unity

Now connect using either spicy or spicec,

spicec -h  -p 5900

Of course if the container is on a remote host, you’ll want to set up some ssh port forwards to enable that, but if needed then that’s a subject for another post.


Author: "s3hh"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 20:00

A little radiation goes a long way.

Your microwave can be used for more than reheating coffee.

It is far more versatile a device, for instance, you can make these fat-free potato chips ("crisps" for you British gentlepeople) in one with very little effort.

    Ingredients

  • 1 potato,
  • sea salt, to taste
  • any other seasoning or spice that you'd like to flavour the chips with.
  • Needed Equipment

  • Microwave
  • Useful Equipment

  • a mandoline –brilliant thing to have, even a sub-$20 will do
  • a silicon sheet –for a non-stick surface in the microwave, I recommend the brand "Silpat"

    Directions

  1. Thinly cut the potato into even, 2-3 millimeter slices.
  2. Here, a mandoline is incredibly useful (even perhaps ideal or necessary).
  3. Rinse the excess starch off the potato slices and shake/pat/spin off the excess water.
  4. Place the slices onto a non-stick microwave-safe (no metals!) sheet, without overlap.
  5. Microwave on high power for 2 minutes. This'll remove a lot of the water in the potato and you'll begin to see them browning.
  6. Flip the slices and microwave for another minute. Keep an eye on them while they're in there to prevent burning.
  7. Remove any nicely browned chips.
  8. For any not fully done, zap on high in 10 second intervals until they too are browned.
  9. Season with salt, to your tastes, and/or any other thing really.
  10. Enjoy, guilt-free. :)
Author: "Sam Hewitt"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 19:18

PLUMgrid , the leader in Virtual Network Infrastructure (VNI), today announced that PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 has achieved certification for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform . The certification ensures that PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 has been integrated, tested and certified for use with Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform.
PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 is a secure virtual networking product for large-scale OpenStack clouds. Built using PLUMgrid Platform and IO Visor™ technology , it provides an easy and simple solution to build cloud infrastructure at scale and offer secure, multi-tenant network services to OpenStack cloud users. Based on a highly automated workflow, PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 enables applications and users to deploy private Virtual Domains™ in seconds without changing the physical network fabric.

Source:

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/plumgrid-virtual-network-infrastructure-achieves-certification-for-red-hat-enterprise-linux-openstack-platform-2014-04-14

Author: "rascal23"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 19:17

IBM says that now is great time for KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) technology as a result of key contributions from its large developer community.
The KVM hypervisor is an open source virtualization technology and, increasingly, it is becoming an important tool in any Linux user’s handbook, especially in light of OpenStack.
KVM is a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions (Intel VT or AMD-V) and consisting of a loadable kernel module (kvm.ko) that provides the core virtualization infrastructure and a processor-specific module (kvm-intel.ko) or (kvm-amd.ko).
IBM says that hypervisors have had to better manage compute, network, and storage resources — and that this need that has been fulfilled by KVM.

Source:

http://www.drdobbs.com/open-source/ibm-now-is-the-time-for-kvm/240167057

Author: "rascal23"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 19:11




This article is cross-posted on Docker's blog as well.

There is a design pattern, occasionally found in nature, when some of the most elegant and impressive solutions often seem so intuitive, in retrospect.



For me, Docker is just that sort of game changing, hyper-innovative technology, that, at its core,  somehow seems straightforward, beautiful, and obvious.



Linux containers, repositories of popular base images, snapshots using modern copy-on-write filesystem features.  Brilliant, yet so simple.  Docker.io for the win!


I clearly recall nine long months ago, intrigued by a fervor of HackerNews excitement pulsing around a nascent Docker technology.  I followed a set of instructions on a very well designed and tastefully manicured web page, in order to launch my first Docker container.  Something like: start with Ubuntu 13.04, downgrade the kernel, reboot, add an out-of-band package repository, install an oddly named package, import some images, perhaps debug or ignore some errors, and then launch.  In few moments, I could clearly see the beginnings of a brave new world of lightning fast, cleanly managed, incrementally saved, highly dense, operating system containers.

Ubuntu inside of Ubuntu, Inception style.  So.  Much.  Potential.



Fast forward to today -- April 18, 2014 -- and the combination of Docker and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS has raised the bar, introducing a new echelon of usability and convenience, and coupled with the trust and track record of enterprise grade Long Term Support from Canonical and the Ubuntu community.
Big thanks, by the way, to Paul Tagliamonte, upstream Debian packager of Docker.io, as well as all of the early testers and users of Docker during the Ubuntu development cycle.
Docker is now officially in Ubuntu.  That makes Ubuntu 14.04 LTS the first enterprise grade Linux distribution to ship with Docker natively packaged, continuously tested, and instantly installable.  Millions of Ubuntu servers are now never more than three commands away from launching or managing Linux container sandboxes, thanks to Docker.


sudo apt-get install docker.io
sudo docker.io pull ubuntu
sudo docker.io run -i -t ubuntu /bin/bash


And after that last command, Ubuntu is now officially running within Docker, inside of a Linux container.

Brilliant.

Simple.

Elegant.

User friendly.

Just the way we like things in Ubuntu, thanks to our friends at Docker.io!


Cheers,
:-Dustin
Author: "Dustin Kirkland"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 17:46
HUD shown over terminal app with commands visible

Most expert users know how powerful the command line is on their Ubuntu system, but one of the common criticisms of it is that the commands themselves are hard to discover and remember the exact syntax for. To help a little bit with this I've created a small patch to the Ubuntu Terminal which adds entries into the HUD so that they can be searched by how people might think of the feature. Hopefully this will provide a way to introduce people to the command line, and provide experienced users with some commands that they might have not known about on their Ubuntu Phone. Let's look at one of the commands I added:

UnityActions.Action {
  text: i18n.tr("Networking Status")
  keywords: i18n.tr("Wireless;Ethernet;Access Points")
  onTriggered: ksession.sendText("\x03\nnm-tool\n")
}

This command quite simply prints out the status of the networking on the device. But some folks probably don't think of it as networking, they just want to search for the wireless status. By using the HUD keywords feature we're able to add a list of other possible search strings for the command. Now someone can type wireless status into the HUD and figure out the command that they need. This is a powerful way to discover new functionality. Plus (and this is really important) these can all be translated into their local language.

It is tradition in my family to spend this weekend looking for brightly colored eggs that have been hidden. If you update your terminal application I hope you'll be able to enjoy the same tradition this weekend.

Author: "--"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 15:13

So at last it’s here. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

And I have to say ‘Thank you’ for pushing this out.

I am running Trusty Tahr for a long time now, while it was still in development on my workstation. And it’s one of the best releases so far.

Even during development only some glitches were encountered, but were easily workarounded, and this is actually pretty amazing.

When you followed Ubuntu for some years now (and to some extend also invovled in pushing software to it), you know that this wasn’t always the case.

We had a couple of really serious hickups, but this release was very handsome. I think Canonicals push towards automated QA and the upload pocket behaviour change were the right things to do.

Thanks Guys, for delivering this amazing release. You really can celebrate and drink a lot of booze and have a good meal (well, now that Jono is the definitive Ubuntu Smoker King, he could serve some delicious pulled pork or whatever he is able to smoke ;))

Again, thank you, you all know who you are. You guys are amazing. Rock On!

Author: "--"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 13:26

You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view — until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.
–To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch

These aren’t purely my thoughts. I’m sure I read something somewhere that sparked them, but I don’t have a link or citation, so I’m just being honest that I am not the source of all that I have written here, although I am using my words. Oh, and great book.

I’ve been thinking about this. I love the idea and I will always strive to learn about and understand other’s perspectives. But, I feel inadequate, like if I am to be honest, I really cannot do this. Not completely, anyway.

No matter how hard we try, we will each still see things with some skewing from your own perspective. We can never really know what it’s like to be that other person.

When you hear, see, or experience other people’s lives you may try to put yourself in their shoes and consider how you would deal with life as it has been dealt to them. That is noble.

However, it is impossible for us to actually do so. We hear, see, and experience things differently and our history and emotional, spiritual, mental, and intellectual makeup and status affect that. We each create our own reality based on our experiences filtered through all those layers of what we call self.

You can live with someone your/their whole life but that doesn’t mean you really understand their perspective. You may know intimate details or have a pretty good idea of what the other person is likely to think or do in certain situations based on past responses and patterns of behavior, but that is not really the same thing.

No matter how much we think we do, we are unable to climb fully into the mind and perspective of someone else. We are all made up of our perceptions, experiences of success and failures, societal programming, genders, and more. Humans are complex

To fully grasp another person’s perspective in its purest form we would have to wipe clear all of who we are and then copy over to ourselves who the other person is. It is not possible to eliminate our biases this way.

I’m starting to think that we can never really climb inside someone else’s skin, but we can hope to acquire a better understanding. The attempt is worth the effort, even if it can never be complete. We can learn to walk beside someone else. We can attempt to see things from their perspective. In doing so, we each hope we gave and gained something from it, drawing each of us a little bit closer to the other.

Author: "matthew"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 13:10
Yesterday I started work on an app that I personally want to use. I don't have a car, so I use services like Metro Bus, Metro Rail, Car2Go, and BikeShare around DC all the time. It's annoying to go to each different web page or app to get the information that I want, so I decided to write an app that combines it all for me in one place.

After asking around, I settled on a best practice for Ubuntu map apps, and I was pointed to this excellent code as a basis:
http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~yohanboniface/osmtouch/trunk/view/head:/OSMTouch.qml

It was so easy and fun once I got started, that I decided to show the world. So, here we go.

I started with a "Simple UI" project. Then I deleted the default column that it started with, and I set the title of the Page to an empty string. While I was at it, I changed the height and width to be more like a phone's dimensions to make testing a little easier. So my starter code for an emply Window looks like this:
 import QtQuick 2.0  
import Ubuntu.Components 0.1
import "components"
MainView {
objectName: "mainView"
applicationName: "com.ubuntu.developer.rick-rickspencer3.MapExample"
width: units.gu(40)
height: units.gu(60)
Page
{
title: i18n.tr("")
}
}
So what's missing now is a map. First I need to import the parts of Qt where I get location and map information, so I add these imports:
 import QtPositioning 5.2  
import QtLocation 5.0
Then I can use the Map tag to add a Map to the MainView. I do four things in the Map to make it show up. First, I tell it to fill it's parent (normal for any component). Then I set it's center property. I choose to do this using a coordinate. Note that you can't make a coordinate in a declarative way, you have to construct it like below. The center property tells the map the latitude and longitude to be centered on. Then I choose the zoom level, which determines the scale of the map. Finally, I need to specify the plug in. For various reasons, I choose to use the Open Street Maps plugin, though feel free to experiment with others. So, a basic funcitonal map looks like this:
   Page  
{
title: i18n.tr("")
Map
{
anchors.fill: parent
center: QtPositioning.coordinate(38.87, -77.045)
zoomLevel: 13
plugin: Plugin { name: "osm"}
}
}
When I run it, I get a lot of functionality for free. On the desktop I can drag the map, and when I run the app on my phone or tablet, I can pinch to zoom in or out. All that functionality comes for free. Of course, you are free to add mapping controls as desired, but I find that map works well out of the box, at least on a device that supports pinch and zoom.


Typically, a map displays little pinpoints. These are often referred to as Points of Interest, or more typically "POI". It's delightfully easy to populate your map with POI using our old friend XmlListModel. First, you will need some XML that has location information. For this exmaple, I am going to use the Bike Share feed for Washington, DC. It's easy to get and to parse, so it makes a nice example. You can see the feed here:
https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml

So let's use it to set up our XmlListModel. First, of course, we need to import the XmlListModel functionality.


 import QtQuick.XmlListModel 2.0  
Next, we'll make the list model, and use the query and Roles functionality to set up the model with the latitude and longitude of each POI inside the model. This is *exactly* like using the XmlListModel for a typical list view. Very cool.
   XmlListModel  
{
id: bikeStationModel
source: "https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml"
query: "/stations/station"
XmlRole { name: "lat"; query: "lat/string()"; isKey: true }
XmlRole { name: "lng"; query: "long/string()"; isKey: true }
}
Now that I have my list model set up, it's time to display them on the Map. We don't do that with a ListView, but rather wtih a MapItemView. This works exactly the same as a ListView, except it displays items on a map instead of in a list. Just like a ListView I need a delegate that will translate use data from the each item in the XmlListModel to create a UI element. In this case, it's a MapQuickItem instead of a ListItem (or similar). A MapQuickItem needs to know 4 things.

  1. The model where it will get the data. In this case, it's my XmlListModel, but it could be a javascript list or other model as well.
  2. A latitude and longitude for the POI, which I set up as roles in the XmlListModel.
  3. An offset for whatever I am using for POI so that it is positioned properly. In this case I have made a little pushpin image out of the bikeshare logo (I know it's bad I'll make a better one later :) ). The offset is set by anchorPoint, so I make the anchorPoint the bottom and center of of the pushpin. 
  4. Something to use for the POI. In this case, I choose to use an image. Note that it is important to use grid units, or the POI may appear too small on some devices, and too large on others. Grid Units make them "just right" on all devices, and ensure that users can click them on any device. 


So, here is my MapItemView that goes *inside* the Map tag. It's a MapItemView for the map, after all.

       MapItemView  
{
model: bikeStationModel
delegate: MapQuickItem
{
id: poiItem
coordinate: QtPositioning.coordinate(lat,lng)
anchorPoint.x: poiImage.width * 0.5
anchorPoint.y: poiImage.height
sourceItem: Image
{
id: poiImage
width: units.gu(2)
height: units.gu(2)
source: "bike_poi.png"
}
}
}
Now when I run the app, the POI are displayed. As you would expect, when the user moves the Map, the MapItemView automatically displays the correct POI. It's really that easy.


If you want to add interactivity, that's easy, you can simply add a MouseArea to the Image and then use things like Ubuntu.Components.Popups to popup additional information about the POI. 


This sample code is here: http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~rick-rickspencer3/+junk/MapExample/view/head:/MapExample.qml
Author: "Rick Spencer"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 11:50

Kubuntu 14.04 LTS was released yesterday along with the all new KDE SC 4.13.  Browsing around the internet this morning the feedback feels really good.  Here’s some of my favourite quotes.

spiros spiros on Google+

Thank you for this great release :)

César J. Pinto on Google+

My God… I’m very surprise with kubuntu… it feels more fast than unity and gnome. wow…. I just…. i have no words to describe my happiness :D

@srikrishnaholla on Twitter

Downloading #kubuntu 14.04 LTS. Man, I’ve missed #kde !

 

@gholmer on Twitter
 

Get it while it’s hot! Newest Ubuntu with the king of desktop environments, KDE! #kubuntu http://www.kubuntu.org

@apachelogger on Twitter [OK he's not entirely neutral]

This is the best release so far! Such awesome, so #Kubuntu 14.04 LTS! http://goo.gl/jQFdZJ  #bestreleaseever

@jotakinhan on Twitter

Using #kubuntu again after using other distros for long time and its great!

@LowEndGeek on Twitter

Re-visiting #kde on #kubuntu 14.04 Working much better than regular #ubuntu

One of the first reviews was on Tux Arena:

“It is a beautiful release and it will definitely be here to stay for quite some time”

And in my inbox:

From: Robert Kovacs

Subject: Excellent Release Kubuntu 14.04

Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 00:15:33 -0400

Thanks for all the hard work!. Kudos to the Kubuntu team. Just installed     Kubuntu 14.04 and everything is working fine. Was using Kubuntu 12.04.3,    which was also a great release.

Cheers!.
Bob Kovacs (USA)

Author: "Jonathan Riddell"
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Date: Friday, 18 Apr 2014 05:20

Just finished up the first draft of an Installfest worksheet.  Let me know what you think…

XP to Ubuntu Worksheet

Author: "Bryan"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Apr 2014 22:58

My apologies in advance for the shorter blog post about this, but like many other Ubuntu folks, I am absolutely exhausted right now. Everyone, across the board, has been working their collective socks off to make Ubuntu 14.04 LTS a fantastic release on desktop, server, and cloud, and pull together our next iteration of Ubuntu for smart-phones and tablets. Consequently, when the trigger is pulled to share our final product with the world, release day is often less of a blistering and energetic woo-hoo, but more of an exhausted but satisfying oh-yeah (complete with beer firmly clenched in hand).

I am hugely proud of this release. The last six months have arguably been our busiest yet. No longer are we just working on desktop and server editions of Ubuntu, but we are building for the cloud and full convergence across the client. No longer are we “just” pulling together the fruits of upstream software projects but we are building our own platform too; the Ubuntu SDK, developer eco-system, charm store, image-based updates, push notifications, app lifecycle, and more. While the work has been intense and at times frantic, it has always been measured and carefully executed. Much of this has been thanks to many of our most under-thanked people; the members of our tremendous QA and CI teams.

Today, tomorrow, and for weeks to come our users, the press, the industry, and others will assess our work in Ubuntu 14.04 across these different platforms, and I am very confident they will love what they see. Ubuntu 14.04 embodies the true spirit of Ubuntu; innovation, openness, and people.

But as we wait to see the reviews let’s take a moment for each other. Now is a great time to reach out to each other and those Ubuntu folks you know (and don’t know) and share some kudos, some thanks, and some great stories. Until we get to the day where machines make software, today software is made by people and great software is built by great people.

Thanks everyone for every ounce of effort you fed into Ubuntu and our many flavors. We just took another big leap forward towards our future.

Author: "jono"
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Date: Thursday, 17 Apr 2014 22:19
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