• Shortcuts : 'n' next unread feed - 'p' previous unread feed • Styles : 1 2

» Publishers, Monetize your RSS feeds with FeedShow:  More infos  (Show/Hide Ads)


Date: Thursday, 20 May 2010 21:34
Another big thanks to for Borr who identified Rogelio Naranjo as the artist of much of the work in the last post on Nexos magazine. I went searching for more of Rogelio Naranjo's work and found scans of his 1982 book Qué caso tiene at La Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo's site, where Naranjo studied. Here are some favorites:

Rogelio Naranjo 1

Rogelio Naranjo 70

Rogelio Naranjo 27


Rogelio Naranjo 45

Rogelio Naranjo 59

Rogelio Naranjo 8

Rogelio Naranjo 25

Rogelio Naranjo 29

Rogelio Naranjo 30

Rogelio Naranjo 63

Rogelio Naranjo 40

Rogelio Naranjo 19

Rogelio Naranjo 35

Rogelio Naranjo 67A

Rogelio Naranjo 20

-
Many more (including some great caricatures) at la Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo [link]
Rogelio Naranjo at Wikipedia (en español) [link]
Qué caso tiene at WorldCat [link] at OpenLibrary [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Qué caso tiene, Mexico., Book Art., Ro..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 17 May 2010 02:46
Nexos is a monthly cultural magazine published in Mexico City. The magazine was started in 1978, and is not related to the South American Nexos Magazine published by American Airlines. Following are some visual works from the first several issues that I found. Unfortunately, I have no information on the artists. (And once again, thank you to my beautiful graduating gf for the below translations.)

EDIT: huge thanks to Borr for identifying Rogelio Naranjo as the artist of many of the below illustrations.

"It was founded in 1978 by historian Enrique Florescano, with the idea of presenting segments of society, science, and literature in a publication that would think about and consider public life, and criticize the society and politics of Mexico. Since then, Nexus has followed the fundamental transformation of the country. During thirty years, its pages have fostered intellectual and academic debate, documenting the precariousness of the state of the Right, economic stagnation, and poverty and inequities, among other obstacles of change. As a magazine that advocates ideological diversity, Nexos has encouraged and stimulated democratic reform which makes us think that the Mexico of 1978 may have occurred in another country." -translated from the Nexos Group Facebook page

1 - 1978 Jan Cover Detail
No. 1, Jan 1978 Detail, possibly by George Grosz (?) (thanks to P-E Fronning)

1 - 1978 Jan Cover
No. 1, Jan 1978

"Nexus desires to be what its name announces: a place of intersection and connections, a point of links for experiences and disciplines that specialization tends to segregate, and even oppose. It aspires to be a forum where problems of science and technology, economic and social research, literary essays, and historical and contemporary politics are expressed." -from Issue number 1, January 1978.

2 - 1978 Feb Cover Detail
No. 2, Feb 1978 Detail

2 - 1978 Feb Cover
No. 2, Feb 1978, by Rogelio Naranjo

4 - 1978 Apr Cover
No. 4, April 1978

6 - 1978 Jun Cover
No. 6, June 1978

14 - 1979 D
by Rogelio Naranjo

2 - 1978 B
by Rogelio Naranjo

14 - 1979 C

2 - 1978 A
by Rogelio Naranjo

13 - 1979 A
"I will only judge on personality and talent," by Rogelio Naranjo

17 - 1979 A

17 - 1979 B

14 - 1979 A
by Rogelio Naranjo

12 - 1978 A

Nexos website [link]
Image gallery of recent issues on their website [link]
Nexos Facebook group page [link]
more works are posted on my flickr page [link]

1978 B
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Mexico., Collections., Rogelio Naranjo, ..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 15 Apr 2010 17:03
There are already a few posts about from this incredible exhibition, including one by the great BibliOdyssey, but I couldn't help but post a few more.

Ruslan Naiden - Signs list #1 (Paper, ink, pen, 46x46 cm, 1994)
Ruslan Naiden - Signs list #1 (Paper, ink, pen, 46x46 cm, 1994)

Georgy Kozubov - Expromt (Paper, ink, worn brush, pointed pen. 1989)
Georgy Kozubov - Expromt (Paper, ink, worn brush, pointed pen, 1989)

Georgy Kozubov - Schriftomahia ( Digital copy. Original- blotting paper for lithography, watercolor, Сhinese ink, brush, metal pen, 56x46 cm, 1986)
Georgy Kozubov - Schriftomahia (Digital copy. Original- blotting paper for lithography, watercolor, Сhinese ink, brush, metal pen, 56x46 cm, 1986)

Karin BAUER - We will find us (Wir werden uns finden)  (Ink on   handmade paper, 29x21 cm, 2008)
Karin Bauer - We will find us (Wir werden uns finden) (Ink on handmade paper, 29x21 cm, 2008)

Olga Varlamova - From the choir of the Borovichsky Saint-Spirit  cloister (Book sign. Color paper, ink, pointed nib, 8.9x9.05 cm, 2009)
Olga Varlamova - From the choir of the Borovichsky Saint-Spirit cloister (Book sign. Color paper, ink, pointed nib, 8.9x9.05 cm, 2009)

Abdul Baki Abu Bakar - The powerful (Paper & Holbein ink,     Bamboo, 92x60 cm, 2008)
Abdul Baki Abu Bakar - The powerful (Paper & Holbein ink, Bamboo, 92x60 cm, 2008)

Claudio Gil - et&et (Sketchbook spread. Felt marker, 33x23cm,   2006)
Claudio Gil - et&et (Sketchbook spread. Felt marker, 33x23cm, 2006)

Zarkh Ekaterina - Beyond the circle bounds II (Poem ''My city strewed with gold in autumn'') (Paper, ink, pen, 42x60 cm, 2003)
Zarkh Ekaterina - Beyond the circle bounds II (Poem "My city strewed with gold in autumn") (Paper, ink, pen, 42x60 cm, 2003)

Vera Evstafieva - Literature map of the St.-Petersburg (for the  Russia! journal) (Lettering, Adobe Photoshop, 43х28 cm, 2008)
Vera Evstafieva - Literature map of the St. Petersburg (for the Russia! journal) (Lettering, Adobe Photoshop, 43х28 cm, 2008)

Yury Toreev - ''The snow is falling, thus drawing veil up to   horizon…'' ( Arttext after the verse by Nakhakara Tuya) (Paper, pen,   ink, 84x84 cm, 2008.)
Yury Toreev - "The snow is falling, thus drawing veil up to horizon..." (Arttext after the verse by Nakhakara Tuya) (Paper, pen, ink, 84x84 cm, 2008)

Yury Toreev - Coming ( Writing on glass with a rubber brush upon   wet gouache, photoprint from glass by a contact method, scanning,   printer, 84x68 cm, 2003.)
Yury Toreev - Coming (Writing on glass with a rubber brush upon wet gouache, photoprint from glass by a contact method, scanning, printer, 84x68 cm, 2003)

Pavel Semchenko - Sacred melody (Graphic, 61x61 cm)
Pavel Semchenko - Sacred melody (Graphic, 61x61 cm)
-

All images from the International Exhibition of Calligraphy's website [link]
Russia's National Union of Calligraphers [link]
BibliOdyssey's post from the same exhibition [link]
More calligraphy at BibliOdyssey [link]
A post on the exhibition at 79 Ideas [link]
The Blog Notes: A Calligraphic Journal [link]
Many great calligraphy links at Omniglot [link]

Shahnawaz Alam Ahmed - Poetry by Meer Taqi Meer, a renown poet of   India (Paper, self made ink and bamboo pen, 21х29.7 cm, 2009) c
Shahnawaz Alam Ahmed - Poetry by Meer Taqi Meer, a renown poet of India (Paper, self made ink and bamboo pen, 21х29.7 cm, 2009)
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Collections., Calligraphy, Russia., Art,..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 07 Apr 2010 23:45
Beverly Hills High School Commencement (Alvin Lustig, 1942)a
Beverly Hills High School Commencement, 1942

Philately in Europe brochure, by Alvin Lustig, 1939
Philately in Europe brochure, 1939

Incantation, Textile Design 1947
Incantation, Textile Design, 1947 [via] (see it in fabric form at Alki1's flickr ---> [link])

Alvin Lustig christmas card 1938-42
Christmas card, 1940

Typography Manual
Typography Manual, Art Teacher's Association of LA, 1941 [via]

1941 Alvin Lustig LETTERPRESS Self-Promotion broadside
Self-Promotion broadside, 1941

Beverly Hills High School - 23rd commencement (Alvin Lustig,  1940)a
Twenty-Third Commencement - Beverly Hills High School, 1940

Beverly Hills High School - 25th commencement (Alvin Lustig, 1942)
Twenty-Fifth Commencement - Beverly Hills High School, 1942

From These Basic, Standard, Typographic - design by Alvin Lustig
Sheet with typographic shapes, 1939

Ninth Graphic Arts Production Yearbook, 1950
Ninth Graphic Arts Production Yearbook, 1950

Lustig one-man exhibiton at the A-D Gallery (NY) joints for special install. structure to hold panels for displays
Joints for special install, at the Alvin Lustig exhibition at the A-D Gallery, 1949

Alvin Lustig Office 1951
Alvin Lustig's Office(?), 1951

Photo of Alvin Lustig, 1945
Alvin Lustig, 1945
-
The fantastic Alvin Lustig website [link]
The Alvin & Elaine Lustig Design flickr pool [link]
Articles & Texticles has a great entry on Mr. Lustig, from which several of the above images are from [link]
More of Lustig's works at the Smithsonian's collection [link]
Great bio and more works at AIGA [link]
More works at Dr. Leslie's project [link]
Books on/of Alvin Lustig's works at worldcat [link]

Charles house - fireplace sculpture, design by Alvin Lustig
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Alvin Lustig, United States, Lustig, Eph..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 22 Mar 2010 04:00
While checking out my town's new rare/used book store, Logos Books, I found this book of a collection of works from China's 'Central Academy of Arts & Design'. The full (and awkwardly translated) titled is "Selections of Designing Work the Central Academy of Arts & Design, 1956-1986" by Zhong Yang, Gong Yi Mei Shu Xue Yuan and She Ji Pin Xuan. I can find no information about the book online. Here are a few of my favorite book covers from the book. I'll post some posters and record designs from the book sometime soon.

Design, Wang Xiaofei
Design, Wang Xiaofei

The Selected Works of the Film songs, Chen Shaohua
The Selected Works of the Film songs, Chen Shaohua

Clown Hans, Yu Bingnan
Clown Hans, Yu Bingnan

Contemporaries, He Yanming
Contemporaries, He Yanming

Motherland in My Heart, Wu Guanying
Motherland in My Heart, Wu Guanying

Time and Life, Chen Yadan
Time and Life, Chen Yadan

Eagle, Ci Xiangqun
Eagle, Ci Xiangqun

Aesop's Fables, Li Meng
Aesop's Fables, Li Meng

Wall, Yue Xin
Wall, Yue Xin

The Timber Processing and its Utility, Kang Renping
The Timber Processing and its Utility, Kang Renping

Frontier Town, Kang Renping
Frontier Town, Kang Renping

Frontier Town, Ren Jianmin
Frontier Town, Ren Jianmin

The Selected Works of Zhang Henshui, Yu Bingnan
The Selected Works of Zhang Henshui, Yu Bingnan

Gas Press-Container, Kang Renping
Gas Press-Container, Kang Renping

The Great Wall, He Yanming
The Great Wall, He Yanming

The Spring of the Beauties, Chen Xiaohong
The Spring of the Beauties, Chen Xiaohong

-
Found this at my newly reopened local independent bookstore, Logos Books [link]
a few more covers are posted over at my flickr [link]
The Central Academy of Arts & Design (who put out this book) seems to be now known as "China Central Academy Of Fine Arts" [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Book Art., China, Design., Chinese, Book..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 01 Mar 2010 05:42
From various collections at the Netherlands Architecture Institute's website.

H Klopma and JB Bakema, architectural firm Van den Broek and  Bakema, City on Pampus, drawing, 1964
City on Pampus, Megastructure, by H. Klopma and J.B. Bakema, from the architectural firm Van den Broek and Bakema, drawing, 1964 [link]

J.M. de Casseres, Eindhoven city expansion map, 1930
Eindhoven city expansion - an expansion model based on a regional concept, J.M. de Casseres, 1930 [link]

Utrecht Music Society. Jupiter Amans. Schipbreuk (PJ C Klaarhamer 1924)
Utrecht Music Society, Jupiter Amans, Schipbreuk, PJ C Klaarhamer, 1924 [link]

Granpré Molière, Verhagen and Kok, Expansion plan for the Left Bank of the Maas, Rotterdam map, 1921
Expansion plan for the Left Bank of the Maas - Rotterdam map, Granpré Molière, Verhagen and Kok, 1921 [link]

Spring Clothing from Schocken Store (Johan Niegeman 1926)
Spring Clothing from Schocken Store, Johan Niegeman, 1926 [link]

Design drawing by W. la Croix for the cover of the magazine De 8 and Opbouw, 1937. NAI Collection - CROX
Cover of the magazine De 8 and Opbouw, W. la Croix, 1937 [link]

Design drawing by W. la Croix for the Holland America Line, n.d. NAI Collection - CROX
Holland America Line, W. la Croix, no date [link]


Poster for the seventh CIAM congress, Max Huber, 1949 [link]

Theo van Doesburg, De Stijl magazine, 1917
De Stijl magazine, Theo van Doesburg, 1917 [link]

Theo van Doesburg and architect Cornelis Van Eesteren, drawing,  1923
Contra-construction - Maison Particulière, Theo van Doesburg and architect Cornelis Van Eesteren, 1923 [link]

J.B. Bakema, Van stoel tot stad, book, 1964
Van stoel tot stad, book, J.B. Bakema, 1964 [link]

Architecture Exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright (H. Th. Wijdeveld 1931)
Architecture Exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright,H. Th. Wijdeveld, 1931 [link]

City Hall on the Amstel (Wim Brusse 1958)
City Hall on the Amstel, Wim Brusse, 1958 [link]

Rietveld (Jan Bons 1959)
Rietveld, Jan Bons, 1959 [link]

Design drawing by W. la Croix for the Metal Workers’ Union, 1927.  NAI Collection - CROX
Metal Workers’ Union, W. la Croix, 1927 [link]

Piet Blom, Dwelling as an urban roof, collage, 1965
Dwelling as an urban roof, collage, Piet Blom, 1965 [link]

Design drawing for name stamp G.F. la Croix and J.M. van der Mey, 1906. NAI Collection
Design drawing for name stamp, G.F. la Croix and J.M. van der Mey, 1906 [link]

-
all images come from the Netherlands Architecture Institute's website [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Netherlands., Ephemeron., la Croix, Dutc..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 11 Feb 2010 04:40
I came across a worn Russian book of Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov’s theatre posters, called Teatralʹnyĭ plakat N. Akimova. The book was published in Moscow in 1963 and is now out-of-print, but can be found at a few libraries in the US, UK, and Japan. Below are some of my favorites. EDIT - Huge thanks to Ingvar for providing the below translations.

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 6
The Labyrinth

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov (1901 – 1968) was a "Russian stage designer, director, painter and graphic artist of Ukranian birth. He studied in Petrograd (now St Petersburg) from 1915 to 1919 in an artists' workshop under Mstislav Dobuzhinsky, Aleksandr Yakovlev and Vasily Shukhayev. From 1920 to 1922 he worked as a stage designer in Khar'kov (now Kharkiv). In 1923 he returned to Petrograd, where he worked as a book illustrator and stage designer at the Theatre of Musical Comedy, the Theatre of Drama and the Gor'ky Bol'shoy Theatre of Drama; he also worked in Moscow, at the Theatre of the Revolution, the Vakhtangov Theatre and the Moscow Art Theatre (MKhAT). From 1929 he worked as a director, designing his own productions. He was the Art Director of the Leningrad Theatre of Comedy (1935-49), where the most notable productions he directed and designed were Shakespeare's Twelfth Night (1938), Lope de Vega's Dog in the Manger and Widow of Valencia (1939) and Yevgeny Shvarts's The Shadow (1946), among others. From 1951 to 1955 Akimov was the artistic director of the Leningrad Soviet Theatre; Shadows (by Saltykov-Shchedrin) and The Case (by Sukhovo-Kobylin) stand out among the productions he directed and designed there. From 1955 to the end of his life he was at the Leningrad Theatre of Comedy as Artistic Director; among his best productions there were Shvarts's An Ordinary Miracle (1956) and The Dragon (1962), and Motley Stories (1960) after Chekhov."-answers.com

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 11
The Hunter, 1956

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 7
1905

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 1
Dictatorship

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 19
3 Minute Talk

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 3
The Profiteer

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 10
Night Shindy

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 9
Trees Die Upright

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 17
The Suitcase

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 15
Seat Nr. 16

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 27
The Salesmen of Glory

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 28
The Tragic Story of Hamlet the Danish Prince

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 29

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov 30

Nikolay Pavlovich Akimov
-
brief biography at answers.com [link]
@ worldcat [link]
more posters at Museum of Russian Poster [link]
more of his work at Russian Art & Books [link]
see more from the book at my flickr page [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Nikolay Akimov, Ephemeron., Akimov, Ukra..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 01 Feb 2010 05:52
This is a dual post with Will, from the great A Journey Around My Skull. All of these magnificent covers come courtesy of Quinn Dombrowski's impressive South Asian books project, in which she photographs book covers from the "PK" section (Indo-Iranian languages and literatures) of the University of Chicago's Regenstein library. See more covers at her blog, Women, Snakes and Stalkers, and at her flickr. And be sure to view Will's picks here.

Thank you to @weetstraw, @Coudal, @posteroffensive who first linked me to Women, Snakes and Stalkers.

(click photos to visit the corresponding post at her blog)















































-
visit her blog, Women, Snakes and Stalkers [link]
also check out her flickr [link]
and her website [link]
more at A Journey Around My Skull [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Book Art., Collections., Asia., Literatu..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 25 Jan 2010 22:14
"In February 1921, in Zagreb, the poet Ljubomir Micić launched Zenit, an international magazine for art and culture, as it said in the subtitle; around its zenitist poetics and aesthetics, the magazine gathered representatives of all branches of art, both in the narrow and a broader meaning of the term – of poetry, literature, fine arts, theatre, film, architecture, music – from Yugoslavia, Russia and the West. A total of 43 issues were published, containing contributions in various languages (Ivan Goll’s “The Zenitist Manifesto” was printed in German). After being published regularly for over two years, and after switching the editorial office from Zagreb to Belgrade (the last Zagreb issue, no. 24, was published in May 1923), Zenit was published irregularly, occasionally coming out in the form of a multiple issue (Zenit no. 26-33 was published as an eightfold issue). Apart from the irregularity of its publication, it was characterised by changes of format and changes in outlook in terms of pictural-graphic design.

Zenit was launched at a watershed cultural, political and historical moment: it was preceded by events such as the First World War and all its consequences, the October Revolution (its echo is felt in Branko Ve Poljanski’s “October Manifesto”, published in his authorial periodical Svetokret [Worldturn] in 1921, wherein the author draws a line from the Universe – the turning of the Earth around its axis in cosmos – to the inner, subjective revolution of the spirit), the establishment of a common state, made up of three peoples, separated until then by their immanent processes of national development, and the post-war Europe as a scene where various avant-garde groups and movements pursued their activities. Apart from this, Zenit may be viewed as a dialectical moment of provocation and a turning point in connection with the aesthetisation of the Balkans and its culture, which, until then, had not participated in the artistic and historical events of Europe on an equal footing. These external factors left their mark on the initial programme concept of the periodical, mediated through the most general of slogans about the negation of the war and the building of an international brotherhood of artists, along with a radical calling into question of the “sentry/border guard-like” and the “soldier-like” destiny of the Yugoslav people and arguing in favour of creating a new man and a new art." -Irina Subotić, from the National Library of Serbia


No. 4 - May 1921


No. 8 - October 1921


No. 10 - December 1921


No. 13 - April 1922


No. 15 - June 1922


No. 17-18. - September-October 1922


No. 19-20. - November-December 1922


No. 25 - February 1924


No. 36 - October 1925


No. 41 - May 1926


Jo Klek, advertising, ink, watercolor, 1923.


Jo Klek - collage, Zenit no. 26-33, 1924. 26-33, 1924.


Michael S. Petrov, Poster for the first Zenitovu international exhibitions, kolađ, 1924.


August Černigoj, come attraverso La Strada, collage, 1925.

-

everything above comes from the National Serbian Library's Digital Collection [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Ephemeron., Collections., Magazine., Ser..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 22 Jan 2010 19:45
There are already a lot of illustrations from this famous German political-satire magazine floating around the blogosphere, but a few more wont hurt. Here are some of my favorites:

































-
see most of the issues at their amazing archive [link]
Simplicissimus at wikipedia [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Ephemeron., Political This Political Pra..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 05 Jan 2010 18:10
All posters are from the Swiss Posters Collection (note the watermark in the bottom-right).


by Claude Kuhn; Natural History Museum of Bern, 1985 (see more by the amazing Claude Kuhn ---> [link] ---> [link])


Reopening Geology, by Claude Kuhn; Planet and Space, Natural History Museum of the Civic Community of Berne, 1991


A Voyage of Discovery, by Claudia Schmauder; Johann Jacobs Museum, 1996


Natural Garden; Natural History Museum of Lucerne, 1990


Taxidermy and other methods of animal conservation; Natural History Museum, Freiburg, 1982


Museum of Geneva, 1975(?) (more Museum of Geneva posters ---> [link])


by Ralph Schraivoge; Museum of Design Zurich, 1991


Archigram 1961-74, by Ralph Schraivogel; Museum of Design Zurich, 1995


1930-1970 Fashion; Museum Bellerive Zurich, 1982


by Ernst Keller; Museum Rietberg, Zurich, 1952


Everything in motion, advancement in nature and technology; Nature Museum Lucerne, 2001


Beetles, their colors and shapes; Zoological Museum, University of Zurich, Natural History Museum of the civic community of Berne, 1996


Zaire, masks, figurines; Museum of Ethnology, Basel, 1986


Bees, Museum of Natural History, 1982


Wildlife Photography, Wildlife Biology; Natural History Museum of Lucerne, 1982


by C. Cebreros; Museum d'histoire, ville de Genève, 1998


Eskimo Archeology of Alaska; Historical Museum of Bern, 1977

-
all posters from the Swiss Posters Collection [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Ephemeron., Collections., Posters., Swit..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 30 Dec 2009 00:10
'Lumpenball' is a popular(?) type of ball in Germany where guests come dressed in ragged and tattered clothes.


2. Lumpenball am Fastnachtssonntag im Industriehof (Second Ragged Clothes Ball on Carnival Sunday at the Industriehof), c. 1925


An die Freunde des Lumpenballs!! Das Sommerfest der progressiven Künstler ist am Samstag den 14. Juli (To the Friends of the Ragged Clothes Ball!! The Progressive Artists Summer Party Is on Saturday, July 14), 1928


Da ist er wieder Hurra der Lumpenball No 1 im Dekke Tommes am Samstag, den 19. Januar (There It Is Again The Ragged Clothes Ball No. 1 at the Dekke Tommes on Saturday, January 19), 1929


Wo verbringen Sie die kurzen Tage? Der Lumpenball ist Fastnachtssamstag Fastnachtsmontag Fastnachtsdienstag am Dekke Tommes (Where Do You Spend the Short Days? The Ragged Clothes Ball is on Carnival Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday at the Dekke Tommes), 1930


Der erste Lumpenball ist am Samstag den 17. Januar (The First Ragged Clothes Ball Is on Saturday January 17), 1931


Der 2te Lumpenball ist am Samstag den 31. Januar (The Second Ragged Clothes Ball Is on Saturday, January 31), 1931


3x Lumpenball (Three Times Ragged Clothes Ball), 1931


Der Lumpenball das Fest der progressiven Künstler ist am Samstag den 16. Januar, No 20 (The Ragged Clothes Ball, Party of the Progressive Artists, is on Saturday, January 16, No. 20), 1932


Lumpenball No 22, 23, 24- Die Fester der Progressiven Künstler (Ragged Clothes Ball Nos. 22, 23, 24- A Party for Progressive Artists), c. 1932


Der Lumpenball in Silber, der 25. Lumpenball am 28. Januar (The Ragged Clothes Ball in Silver, The Twenty-fifth Ball on January 28), 1933

-
More of Franz Wilhelm Seiwert's works at the MOMA's website [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Advisements., Flyer., Ephemeron., Collec..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 29 Dec 2009 03:13
Yesterday TheSilverLining posted some great links to Elaine Lustig Cohen works. Here are some more of her works that I have not seen posted elsewhere.


A Type Specimen page, 1950

"Elaine Lustig Cohen (b. 1927) is the pioneering female graphic designer who incorporated the aesthetic vocabulary of European modernism into American graphic design, during the 1950s and 1960s. After training as a painter, she developed her design skills working with Alvin Lustig (whom she married in 1948). Following Lustig's premature death in 1955, she took control of the studio and between 1955 and 1961 produced a distinctive series of covers for publishing houses Meridan Books and New Directions. With their strong concepts, abstract forms and typographic invention, they represented a break from the prevailing tradition of pictorial illustration in book-jacket design. Her ability to summarize the content of text in the cover design was further aided when, working for architects including Eero Saarinen and Philip Johnson she produced signage schemes intended to express a building's character. She designed many posters and catalogues for New York-based arts organizations, including the American Center for the Arts, the Lincoln Center, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Jewish Museum. She married Arthur A. Cohen, publisher of Meridian Books; in 1973, they established Ex Libris, New York, a bookshop and gallery specializing in rare volumes of the European avant-garde. In 1995 her contribution to graphic design was acknowledge by an exhibition at the Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York." (Livingston, 2003, 51). She continues to paint and create dynamic graphic collage-based work and is represented by Julie Saul Gallery, New York. Elaine Lustig Cohen donated her collection to RIT in 2008. " -Graphic Design Archive Online


7th Annual Purim Ball, The Jewish Museum, 1963


Hans Hoffman, 1997


Primary Structures: Younger American & British Sculptors, 1966


Literature in America, 1957


The Philosophy of Spinoza, 1958


The Federalist, 1961


Dangling Man, 1959


Max Ernst: Sculpture and Recent Painting, The Jewish Museum, 1966


Jonathan Edwards, 1959


Silver and Judaica Collection, The Jewish Museum, 1963


The Recollections of Alexis De Tocqueville, 1958


The Ideal Reader, 1997


The Disinherited Mind, 1958


Joseph Conrad, 1947 (co-designed with Alvin Lustig)


The Book of Jazz, 1958


Philosophy in the Middle Ages, 1959


Scenes From the Drama of European Literature, 1959


Jerusalem and Rome: The Writings of Josephus, 1960


Clear Writing, 1959


God and the Way of Knowning, 1957


Artists and Enemies - Three Novelas, 1997


New Year's Party Invitation, 1958

-
see more of Elaine Lustig Cohen's book covers @ Scott Lindberg's excellent flickr page [link]
and at Graphic Design Archive Online [link]
also see thesilverlining's post which inspired me to finally post these [link]
there are a few more of her works at my flickr page [link]
and even more works at Julie Saul Gallery [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Ephemeron., Book Art., Collections."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 02 Nov 2009 04:15

Muerte en cruceta; by Lola Cueto, 1947


La bohemia de la muerte; anonymous, 1958


El crepusculo de la noche, in Tricolor no. 35; July-August 1924


El Hospital Juárez - (Ironia); by Carlos Neve, 1951


detail of Calaveras televisiosas todo por un hoyito; by Leopoldo Méndez and Mariana Yampolsky, 1949


Levantaos de sus fosas, calaveras, que aquí se halla el mayor de los troneras; by Manuel Manilla, 1971


Levantaos de sus fosas, calaveras, que aqui se halla el mayor de los troneras, by Manuel Manilla, 1904


from Veinte años de vida del Taller de Gráfica Popular; Andrea Gómez, 1957


by Julio Ruelas, 1903


from L'ABC no 15; by José Clemente Orozco, November, 1 1925


from Don Timorato no. 19; by Hector Ramírez, Ram, November 3 1944

-
all images are from the stunning book La muerte en el impreso mexicano / Images of Death in Mexican Prints by Mercurio López Casillas [link]
for more prints see Doce Palabras excellent post 'Diálogo con los muertos' [link]
also see Morbid Anatonmy's 'La Portentosa Vida de la Muerte (The Astounding Life of Death)' post on Joaquin Bolaños [link]

Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Mexico., Holiday., Book Art., Collection..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 27 Oct 2009 16:53
The following are from Elaine Lustig Cohen and Ellen Lupton's book Letters from the Avant Garde: Modern Graphic Design, most of which came from Elaine Lustig Cohen's personal collection. Elaine Lustig Cohen was an excellent artist/designer [more on that in a later post] who was married to the great Alvin Lustig. She and her second husband, author/publisher Arthur Cohen, began collecting letterhead in the 1970s for their Ex Libris gallery, but the letters rarely sold. Although collectors at the time tended to view them as unimportant, they offer an unique and personal perspective into many of the most important artistic movements of the early twentieth century.
-

"A global network of avant-garde movements flourished during the first half of the twentieth century, connecting artist and designers across Europe and the United States. Written correspondence, presented on dramatically designed stationery, was a vital part of the infrastructure of this international community. Artist and designers translated concepts from painting, poetry, and architecture onto the commercial format of the letterhead, creating, in effect, ‘corporate identities’ for modernism. Stationery for Futurism, Dada, De Stijl, the Bauhaus, and other groups and institutions served as typographic manifestos for the avant-garde. Some of the works drew on the normative conventions of commercial stationery – often with a flash of irony – while others reflected new concepts of typographic rationality." - Ellen Lupton


Bruno Munari, Mazzotti. Italy, 1934


FT Martinetti, drawing by Giacomo Ball, Movimento Futurista. Rome, 1939


Fortunato Depero, Depero. Italy (Trentino), c. 1927 (Collection Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities, Santa Monica)


Anonymous, Fernando Cervelli. Rome, 1932 (Collection Getty Center for the History of Arts and the Humanities, Santa Monica)


Tristan Tzara, MoUvEmEnT DADA. Paris c. 1918


Johannes Baader and Raoul Hausmann, Club Dada postcard. Berlin, c. 1919


Anonymous, Cause Le Surréalism (a Surrealist association). Paris, 1940s


Benjamin Péret. Paris (Collection W Michael Sheehe, New York)


Alexander Rodchenko, Dobrolet State Merchant Air Service. Moscow, 1923


El Lissitzky. Moscow, 1924


El Lissitzky, Vesc/Object/Gegenstand. Berlin, 1922 (from the collection of Hans Berndt, Germany)


Theo Van Doesburg, De Stijl NB postcard. Netherlands (The Hague and Leiden), 1920


Piet Zwart, Wij Nu Experimenteel Tooneel. The Hague, 1925


Piet Zwart, Laga-Compangnie. The Hague, 1922


Thon De Does, Reclame Ontwerper. Rotterdam, 1930


Josef Peeters, Het Overzicht postcard. Antwerp, 1923


Kurt Schwitters, Merz Werbezentrale envelope. Hanover, 1924


Joost Schmidt, Das Bauhaus in Dessau postcard. Dessau, 1925-26


Herbert Bayer, Ernst Kraus Glasmaler Weimar. Weimar, 1924 (Collection W Michael Sheehe, New York)


E McKnight Kauffer, Lumium Limited. London, 1935 (Collection Cooper-Hewitt, Nat. Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution)

-
all images from Elaine Lustig Cohen and Ellen Lupton's book Letters from the Avant Garde: Modern Graphic Design [link]
also see the blog Billheads & Receipts [link]
David A Bontrager has a remarkable collection of trucking company letterhead [link]
letterhead at amassblog [link]
Insurance Letterhead and Covers [link]

Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Ephemeron., Letterhead., Collections., C..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 13 Oct 2009 00:53
A few months back I posted images from 1905-1906 Russian revolutionary periodicals that I found at Yale University’s digital library. Recently I (accidentally) came across a related book called Blood and Laughter: Caricatures from the 1905 Revolution that contains more illustrations of the 1905-1906 Russian underground press.


from Leshii (Woodgoblin) No. 2, 1906

"Sunday 9 January 1905: Hundreds of thousand of workers assemble in the streets of St Petersburg. They are in their Sunday best and accompanied by their elderly relatives and children. There are no banners or slogans though some carry icons or church emblems, for this is to be a peaceful demonstration led by an Orthodox priest, Father Gapon. They set off for the Winter Palace, bearing to the Tsar their petition for a constitution. ‘Sire!!’ it reads. ‘We workers have come to you to seek justice and protection. We are in great poverty, we are oppressed and weighed down with labors beyond our strength. We are insulted, we are not recognized as human beings…’

For two cold hours they stand waiting in the snow for Tsar Nicholas to appear and receive their petition. A shot rings out, and they stamp their feet. Another, and they laugh that it must be blanks. A third, and suddenly women and children slump lifeless int eh snow. Still they assure themselves that this must be a mistake, for the Tsar would not shoot down unarmed civilians. But now the gendarmes are galloping in the crowd, and the slaughter has begun. The shooting continues all day long. The dead are counted in the hundreds, the wounded in the thousands, their blood spilt on the Schlusselberg Highway, the Troitsky Bridge and the Nevsky Gates. But the police cart away the bodies so quickly that it is impossible to know the full toll.

Bloody Sunday killed superstition, the old faith in a just Tsar, and unleashed a tumultuous rage among the masses. Father Gapon was soon forgotten, ‘his priestly rode’, wrote Trotsky, ‘a mere prop in the drama whose true protagonist was the proletariat’. A huge wave of strikes swept the country, paralyzing more than 100 towns and drawing in a million men and women. Throughout the summer peasants rioted while terrorists struck at figures of authority.

Alongside the struggle in street and factory was the struggle for the free press. Ministers and clerics suffered assassination more by the pen than the bullet as the revolution strove for the expression of powerful emotions long suppressed. A flood of satirical journals poured from the presses, honouring the dead and vilifying the might. Drawings of frenzied immediacy and extraordinary technical virtuosity were combines with prose and verse written in a popular underground language, veiled in allegory, metaphor and reference to the past.

Russia had a rich history of satirical journalism. In the 1770s, in the reign of Katherine the Great, an elite of intellectuals close to the court developed a new ‘aesopian’ language – deeply subversive to the enlightened autocracy – to express their opposition to the old regime. The satire of the court flourished until the shadow of revolution in Europe drove the Empress to suppress it. Again in the 1860s highly popular satirical journals sprang up, drawing consciously on their courtly predecessors to curse the Crimean War and Tsar Alexander II’s empty promises of reform. While populist revolutionaries went ‘to the people’ to make common causes with the peasants, radical journalist set out to collect folk-stories, popular sayings, soldiers’ songs and workers’ ballads. The old allegorical vocabulary was joined to the language of popular satire. By the 1870s these journals has been closed down, but this language was now part of the everyday speech. Satirical writing returned to the underground, where it flourished, rooted in popular protest, until 1905. It was then that satire achieved its full power.

Fore a few brief months the journals spoke with a great and unprecedented rage that neither arrest nor exile could silence. At first their approach was oblique, their allusions veiled, and they often fell victim to the censor’s pencil. But people had suffered censorship for too long. Satirist constantly expanded their territory and their targets of attack, demolishing one obstacle after another as they went, thriving on censorship. The workers’ movement grew in boldness, culminating in the birth of the St Petersburg Soviet of Workers’ Deputies, the people’s government. For fifty days the Tsar and his ministers were confronted by another power, another law. Journalist and printers seized the right to publish without submitting to the censor. The satirical journals then reached their apotheosis, until the revolution died as it had risen, bathed in blood.

More clearly than any party resolution or government proclamation, the caricatures of 1905 tell the story of that heroic failure – and they are a symptom of that failure too…they chronicle with incredible vividness that moment of the transition from Tsarist despotism to Bolshevik revolution." -by Cathy Porter, from Images of Revolution: Graphic Art from 1905 Russia


from K Svetu (Towards the Light) No. 3 1906


"In the State Duma. 'Interpellation'"by Alexander Kudinov. Leshii No. 1, 1906


from K Svetu (Towards the Light) No 2, 1906


Strana Mechty (Land of Dreams) No. 1, 1906


"The Moscow Vampire" - Volshebny Fonar No. 2, 1906 (depiction of Governor-General Fedor Vasilevich Dubasov)


from Kosa No. 4, 1906


from Pchela No. 3, 1906


from Zarnitsy No. 8, 1906 (Witte and Durnovo burning the books)


Krasny Smekh (Red Laughter) No. 2 1906, by Boris Kustodiev


Satiricheskoe Obozrenie (Satirical Review) No. 1, 1906


"The Triumphant Pig" - Maski (Masks) No. 8, 1906


"The Treacherous Neva Reflected Everything" - Volshebny Fonar (Magic Lantern). No. 1, 1906


"Christmas Tree" - Burelom (Storm-Wood), Christmas 1905


"31 December 1905" Burelom (Storm-Wood), Christmas 1905. Facing is Drubasov, the Governor-General of Moscow and organizer of the suppression of the Moscow uprising, and Prime Minister Witte is shown with his back turned, playing with death.


from Zarevo (Dawn) No. 3, 1906


from Zarnitsy (Summer Lightning) No. 1, 1906


-

All of the images come from David King and Cathy Porter's Blood and Laughter : Caricatures From the 1905 Revolution [link]
I haven't yet got my hands on it but David King and Cathy Porter also published Images of Revolution: Graphic Art from 1905 Russia [link]
also, once again, see Yale University's collection at Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library [link]
my previous post on the subject [link]
see Trixie Treat's post on the journals [link]

Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Ephemeron., Political This Political Pra..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 07 Oct 2009 05:21
"Quack is a pejorative term, disparagingly, albeit sometimes defensively, applied by a member of the establishment, the orthodox, regular, professional, credentialed and accepted class to describe the unorthodox, unlicensed, disapproved member of a fringe or irregular group. It is a term of condemnation employed when one wants to belittle another. Above all, the term has become associated with the sellers of medicines and the marketers of medical systems, those with the "true" method of curing specific ills or, in an earlier day, all the ills of mankind.

While the origins of the term are obscure, the term "quack" probably came from the Dutch Quacksalber, a charlatan, mountebank, empiric or itinerant seller of medicine. It may also have been derived from the sounds made by a duck, the term applied to the hawker of nostrums whose excessive zeal in describing the merits of his or her cure may well have sounds similar to the squawking of a duck. The chatter of the quack, in most cases more like torrent s of words, would have been familiar to both town and rural populations even in the ancient periods, for quacks have long been well known in every society. Over the past four hundred years they have been representative figures in folktales, stories and especially in prints, drawings and political caricatures..." –William H. Helfand, from Quack Quack Quack


Detail from "Quid hic nobis lumine satium", c. 1670, Anonymous


Detail from advertisement for Dr. Rock's Tincture, 1738, Anonymous


"The Dance of Death: the Undertaker and the Quack." 1816, by Thomas Rowlandson (from Wellcome Library)


"Nancy Linton: A faithful representation of her actual appearance & condition after having been cured by the use of Swann's Panacea", c. 1833, by C Hullmandel (from a drawing by WH Kearney)


"Singular Effects of the Universal Vegetable Pills on a Green Crocer! A Fact!", 1841, by Charles Jameson Grant


Detail from "The Great Lozenge Maker", 1858, by John Leech - from Punch


"Dr S.B. Collins' Painless Opium Antidote" Advertisement, 1874


"Quackery - Medical Minstrel Performing for the Benefit of Their Former Patients - No other Dead-heads Admitted", 1879, by Joseph Keppler - from Puck


"Death's-Head Doctors - Many Paths to the Grave", 1881, by Joseph Keppler - from Puck


Detail of "Death's-Head Doctors - Many Paths to the Grave", 1881, by Joseph Keppler - from Puck


Detail of "Death's-Head Doctors - Many Paths to the Grave", 1881, by Joseph Keppler - from Puck


"Death in the Pestle", c. 1885, by Henry Nappenbach - from The Wasp


Detail of "Death in the Pestle", c. 1885, by Henry Nappenbach - from The Wasp


"The Travelling Quack", 1889, by Tom Merry


An itinerant medicine vendor known as Medicine Jack carrying his wares in a knapsack on his back. (from Wellcome Library)


"William Radam, Microbes and the Microbe Killer", 1890


"The Great American Fraud, an investigative article by Samuel Hopkins Adams", 1907


Quack advertisement for the cure of cancer, 1912 (from Wellcome Library)

-
Unless noted all of these come from Quack, Quack, Quack: The Sellers of Nostrums in Prints, Posters, Ephemera, & Books by William Helfand - @ Open Library [link]
Wellcome Library has a good collection of quackery related images [link]
The excellent blog The Quack Doctor [link]
The Museum of Questionable Medical Devices [link]
see the blog Quack Cogitations [link]
Quack cartoons at cartoonstock [link]
BBC slideshow: Quacks and Cures [link]

Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Advisements., Science., Ephemeron., Coll..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Sunday, 06 Sep 2009 02:15
About a week ago Amy at Aqua Velvet posted some remarkable Japanese Postcards from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Here are more Japanese postcards from the same collection, all related to the Year of the Monkey ( ).


Monkey Trainer from Towa shinpo, Ogawa Usen, 1908

"Born 2004, 1992, 1980, 1968, 1956, 1944, 1932, 1920, 1908. People born in the year of the Monkey are the erratic geniuses of the Zodiac cycle. They are clever and skillful in grand-scale operations and are smart when making financial deals. They are inventive, original and are able to solve the most difficult problems with ease." -Namiko Abe, about.com


The Monkey in Morning Suit of New Year's cards, unknown artist, 1932


The Monkey Celebrating with Ozoni of New Year's cards, unknown artist, 1932


The Monkey's Baseball of New Year's cards, unknown artist, 1932


The Monkey's Rugby of New Year's cards, unknown artist, 1932


The Monkey Pounding Rice (Osaru no mochitsuki) of New Year's cards, unknown artist, 1932


The Monkey's Playing Ball (Osaru no hogan nage) of New Year's cards, unknown artist, 1932


Monkey and Crab, Takahashi Haruka, 1932


Three Monkeys with Spade Shape Motifs, Takahashi Haruka, 1932


Monkey in the Guise of a Shinto Priest, Takahashi Haruka, 1932


Takahashi Haruka, 1932


Takahashi Haruka, 1932


Takahashi Haruka, 1932


Takahashi Haruka, 1932


Takahashi Haruka, 1932 [?]


Three Monkeys: See no Evil, Hear no Evil, Speak no Evil, Takahashi Haruka, 1932

-
Boston's Museum of Fine Arts Japanese Postcards Collection [link]
Information about the Year of the Monkey in the Japanese Zodiac @ about [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Zodiac., Japan., Ephemeron., Calendar., ..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 02 Sep 2009 16:22
I first saw the work of Wilfried "Sätty" Podriech a few weeks back at the California History Museum, which was showing his collages of Gold Rush illustrations. They were surreal and fantastic and I went hunting for more. Here are some of my favorites of his work (that I couldn't already find online) from his books Time Zone and The Cosmic Bicycle.




"Sätty (Wilfried Podriech) was born in Bremen, Germany, in 1939. As a child he played in the ruins of the city, which was heavily bombed during World War Two. After three years of apprenticeship in mechanical engineering, he worked in Canada, then moved to San Francisco in 1961. For a few years he worked as a steward on the Pacific cruise ships of the Matson Line, and later as a heating and ventilating systems designer.

In San Francisco he lived in North Beach, and associated with artists and bohemians of the Beat Generation. Since childhood he had demonstrated artistic potential. In 1966, inspired by the openness and creativity of San Francisco’s emergent Hippie culture, he began making pictorial collages. Some of these were sold as poster size prints, which were then very popular. He became a prolific artist, concerned with fine technique and with expression of the broadest range of human experience. He intended his art to engage the imagination and counteract the pernicious stimulus-response programming of media advertising.

Sätty created many colorful artworks and lithographic prints, and hundreds of black and white collages. During the 1970s many were used as illustrations in both the counter culture and establishment periodicals. He produced two collage books, The Cosmic Bicycle and Time Zone, a pictorial allegory. He created illustrations for the comprehensive treatise, The Annotated Dracula and for The Illustrated Edgar Allen Poe, a book of stories he selected. During the late 1970s until his death in 1982, he produced numerous collages inspired by events in San Francisco’s often dramatic, unruly history, from the Gold Rush to the 1890s. Many of these occasionally bizarre images have recently been published in Visions of Frisco, by Regent Press, Berkeley.

In a review of Sätty’s art, S.F. Chronicle art critic Thomas Albright stated, “His work evidenced his Germanic roots with a somber, dreamlike realm of utopian, surrealist fantasy spiced by disarming accents of the bizarre and grotesque.” His art has been exhibited in many galleries and museums, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Boston Museum of Fine Arts; the National Museum of Art, Belgrade; and the National Museum, Warsaw."
-by Walter Medeiros, The Archive of Counter Culture Art. (via I Want You Magazine)

from The Cosmic Bicycle (1971) -















from Time Zone (1973) -



not a collage, but an illustration from The Annotated Dracula (1975) that I can't help but post -


-
Information, interviews, articles, and exhibition at zpub [link]
John Coulthart has writen about Sätty on his great blog feuilleton and in Strange Attractor Journal Vol. 2, which you can buy here.
Sätty @ I Want You magazine [link]
posters of/by Sätty @ Wolfgangs Vault [link]
album covers by Sätty 1, 2, 3, 4
more Sätty at the excellent blog The Cabinet of the Solar Plexus [link]
Prayer and Ode for Satty by Alan Cohen [link]
Sätty is Dead essay by Michael Bowen [link]
Visions of Frisco @worldcat @amazon; The Cosmic Bicycle @worldcat; Time Zone @worldcat; The Illustrated Edgar Allan Poe @worldcat @amazon; The Annotated Dracula @worldcat, @amazon
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Book Art., Collections., Collage., Satty"
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 01 Sep 2009 18:12
George Cooke was a caricatures artist who drew Edwardian music hall performers for the Grand Theatre of Varieties, in Hanley Worcestershire. He compiled them in a series of albums.


This is the frontispiece for the first of several albums of caricatures of music hall performers by George Cooke. The Dame figure in a roundel is probably a caricature of Cooke himself. The performers below represent the comedian Edwin Boyde, right, and the mimic Leo Tell, left. [link]


Carl Hertz, or Leib Morgenstern, when he was performing at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 9 January 1905. He was billed as ‘The Famous Carl Hertz. In his gigantic show of Marvellous Illusions and Surprises. The most elaborate and sensational conjuring show ever presented. Assisted by Mlle. Dalton’. His acts at Hanley included making a birdcage and canary disappear and discovering the canary in the pocket of an audience member. He also performed there the ‘mystifying movements of a clock dial, which stops at any time spectators may desire, and records the numbers of a throw of a dice before the dice have actually been used’. [link]


Juno Salmo, ‘The Golden Mephisto’, when he was performing at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley. This was either during the week of 2 January 1905 or 16 April 1906. The contortionist Juno Salmo was known as the homme grenouille or ‘frog-man’ when he performed in Paris with the Nouveau Cirque in a frog costume. He dislocated his shoulders, hopped around the aquatic part of the ring and did acrobatic contortions on a trapeze that appeared to be made of bamboo. He is seen here doing a similar act, but balancing on a pole dressed as a yellow devil. [link]


Comedian Edwin Boyde performing the sketch ‘Bread and Jam’ at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 12 December 1904. He was billed enthusiastically as ‘London’s Greatest Comedian’. From all the principal London music halls’. [link]


The Three Meers when they were performing at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 17 October 1904. They were billed as ‘An Eccentric Wire Act. Fifteen Minutes of Continuous Laughter’. [link]


Woody Kelly as a whiskered tramp character. He was performing at the Grand Theatre, Hanley, during the week of 10 June 1907. The act was billed as ‘Kelly and Gilette in the sketch “Fun in a Billiard Room”’. [link]


Dr Carl Hermann when he was topping the bill at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 26 February 1906. He was billed as ‘The Man who Tamed Electricity! The Human Resistance Coil! The Modern Miracle Worker! Hypnotist! Electrician! Scientist! Performs the Feat of Passing over 10,000 Volts of Electricity Through his Body! The Sensation of the Century! Doctor Amazed! Scientists Puzzled!’. [link]


Comedian Will Manning of Manning’s Entertainers. He was performing at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 19 December 1904. The company had appeared there the previous March, and now they were billed as ‘The Welcome Return of Manning’s Entertainers in the Convulsing Carnival of Uproarious Mishaps’. [link]


Comedian George Gilbey when he was performing at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 26 December 1904. He was billed as ‘Mr George Gilbey. From the Principal London Variety Theatres’. [link]


Caricature of the contortionist George Antill, who performed at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 15 August 1904. He was billed as ‘Comedian. The Evening Shadow’. [link]



Morris & Morris when they were performing at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 1 August 1904. They were billed as ‘a pair of real good comedians’. When they appeared previously at the Grand in September 1903, the review noted that, ‘Their fun in the trapeze is equal to anything that has been seen here’. [link]


Comic duo Burns & Evans performing spoof acrobatics at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 8 August 1904. They were billed as ‘American comedians, as Alfonso and Gasten in "Funnambulism" [link]


Caricature of the American performer Wieland when he was topping the bill at the Hippodrome, Stoke-on-Trent, during the week of 24 July 1905. He was billed as ‘The Great Wieland. America’s Foremost Comedy Juggler’. [link]


Sam Mayo, ‘The Immobile One’, when he was performing at the Grand Theatre of Varieties, Hanley, during the week of 29 May 1905. He was billed as ‘the Original Immobile Comedian’. [link]
And here is a 1922 song that I very much enjoy by Sam Mayo, called Things Are Worse In Russia

-
all of these come from the Victoria and Albert Museum [link]
Author: "noreply@blogger.com (joel.)" Tags: "Advisements., Ephemeron., Collections., ..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Next page
» You can also retrieve older items : Read
» © All content and copyrights belong to their respective authors.«
» © FeedShow - Online RSS Feeds Reader