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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 14:21
Earlier this week, we ran down The 10 Best Male Characters In Woody Allen's Films, and one of them was Michael Caine's terrific turn in one of the director's best films, "Hannah And Her Sisters." But as always, history could've played out differently as Allen revealed on a recent podcast with Sad Happy Confused, in a discussion about the great actors he's never had a chance to work with.

"I have called [Robert] De Niro, I've spoken on the phone to Dustin Hoffman and Jack Nicholson. Nicholson was going to do 'Hannah and Her Sisters' — I wasn't thinking of Michael Caine at the time as I wasn't thinking of an English guy. It would never have occurred to me," he said. ""Now I am working with Joaquin Phoenix, who is a great actor, and Sean Penn [but] I just haven't had the opportunity to work with some of our greatest — Pacino, De Niro, Nicholson — they're as great as it gets."

But hey, what about Kevin Spacey? You might recall that last year, the actor revealed he went out of his way to put himself on Allen's radar. "I wrote him a letter and introduced myself as an actor he may or may not know. And I sent him a Netflix subscription, because I want him to watch my work," he told GQ. And Spacey said Allen responded with "an absolutely wonderful letter" letting him know that he is "in contention for things in the future." And it's sentiment the director still has.

"I would love to work with him [Kevin Spacey] if I had anything for him I would do it in a minute." And actually, we'd love to see that collaboration too. Who would you like to see Allen work with down the line?
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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 13:37
Criticwire's Daily Reads brings today's essential news stories and critical pieces to you.

1. Hollywood's Ongoing Homophobia. A recent article in The Dissolve pointed out how cinema is finally covering gay history, but the LGBT community is still woefully underrepresented and misrepresented by Hollywood films. A new GLAAD report found only 17 representations of LGBT characters in 102 films released by the six major studios, most of which were either inessential to the film or regressive stereotypes. One could argue that the point of the scene in question in "The Wolf of Wall Street" is to illustrate the cruelty and moral bankruptcy of the men in the film, but when a Tyler Perry movie has one of the year's most progressive depictions of LGBT, one can't help but be taken aback.

But the L.G.B.T.-positive message of "Peeples" serves as an anomaly on this grim list, where gay characters are not only punchlines ("Grown Ups 2," "We’re the Millers"), but also punching bags ("The Wolf of Wall Street," "Pain & Gain"). From some of the language in the study, it would seem that GLAAD struggled to include even 17 films on this list. Cameron Diaz’s allegedly bisexual character in "The Counselor" was dismissed because, according to GLAAD, “the film does little more than tease this as a possibility.” And almost against their will, GLAAD included Ken Jeong’s Mr. Chow from "The Hangover" trilogy, saying “it’s disheartening that this offensively constructed character also stands out as one of the most significant among the 2013 releases.” Read more.

2. 
Gender Within Film Crews. Speaking of representation, writer/producer Stephen Follows of Catsnake Film has a report on the presence of women on film crews from 1994-2013, and the verdict isn't good. According to Follows, the gender-split of film crews on the top 1,000 grossing films from the two-decade period is made up of only 22.6% women, and only 21.8% of the film crew members on 2013's highest grossing films are female. Most of the crew members are in the costume, makeup and casting departments, with only 24.2% of editors and a paltry 5.1% of camera or electrical crew members being made up of women. 

Once I had complied these league tables I researched who were the key filmmakers behind these 40 movies. The results tell a clear story. The 'Most Male' films are written and directed exclusively by men, four out of five of the producers are male and three-quarters of the principal cast (i.e. top seven names) are also men. In total, 83% of the people involved with these films were men.However, the pattern is not the same for women. While there are far more female filmmakers in the 'Most Female' chart, men are still the majority at 54%. The only place where women outnumber men is in the principal cast. It should be noted that 42% of the writers for the 'Most Female' chart are women, which is way above the UK average of 12% for all films. Read more.

3. Disability Is Not Just a Metaphor. Damn it, can't seem to get off representation today. Hollywood loves movies about disabled characters, but they don't love casting disabled actors in the roles. With rare exceptions like RJ Mitte in "Breaking Bad" or Jamie Brewer in "American Horror Story," playing a disabled character is reserved as a feat for a non-disabled performer to collect accolades for. Why is that more films can't use the lived-in experience and reality of an actor like Harold Russell in "The Best Years of Our Lives?" Perhaps, as The Atlantic's Christopher Shinn writes, it's because audiences are more comfortable knowing that the performer in question isn't really missing a limb.
Often, one fears, that’s the point: Pop culture’s more interested in disability as a metaphor than in disability as something that happens to real people.  For example, in his review of "Side Show," New York Times theater critic Charles Isherwood wrote, "Of course, in some sense, we all know what it’s like to feel self-divided, or alienated from the world, which is what makes 'Side Show' emotionally stirring." Disabled characters are often seen as symbolizing the triumph of the human spirit, or the freakishness we all feel inside. That may be another reason disabled actors are overlooked—they don't allow disability-as-metaphor to flourish as easily. Read more.

4. Why Filmmakers Fail. For every young filmmaker like Ryan Coogler or J.C. Chandor who find acclaim early in their career there are a dozen of struggling directors who can't seem to get a break. Indie marketing and consultant David K. Greenwald says that sometimes there are reasons beyond bad luck, including marketing, failure to collaborate and failure to build relationships. 

BLAMING HOLLYWOOD. Some bash Hollywood as the source of their difficulties. Criticize their film choices, but understand their business as well as they do. The studios are committed to cost efficient line extensions. They are still standing a hundred years later. In any business, that’s success. And focus on their overall track record (the big picture), not on their individual failures. The casinos lose money too occasionally, but that doesn’t change the adage, in the long term “the house always wins”. Read more.

5. How Marvel Become the Envy and Scourge of Hollywood. At this point, the Marvel Cinematic Universe has gone from a fun idea for superhero fans to a chokehold on the modern blockbuster. Ike Perlmutter, the CEO of Marvel Entertainment, rules the company with an iron-fist, and it's not always the prettiest sight on the inside (see: the Edgar Wright blowup). The Hollywood Reporter's Kim Masters has the full story.
On the Marvel board, Perlmutter helped steer the company through bankruptcy protection and survived a battle with investor Carl Icahn to become CEO in 2005 — after which Marvel's plan to produce its own movies was hatched. Perlmutter is said to have attended the "Iron Ma"  premiere in disguise and has not been spotted at a Marvel event since. He relishes his reputation as secretive and frugal, according to a top executive who has dealt with him: "It's things like, 'Why do you need a new pencil? There's 2 inches left on that one!'" Read more.

6. At Least One Real Moment of Humanity with Cameron Diaz. Reception for Cameron Diaz's new comedy "Sex Tape" hasn't been too kind, but Diaz remains hardworking. Alex Pappademas of Grantland had an incredibly awkward interview with the actress that shows the bizarre, artificial way press junkets tend to work.
Shake hands. Say thank-you. Say good-bye. Immediately begin asking yourself why you got the Cameron Diaz chatbot instead of the Cameron Diaz who has eccentric thoughts on crunchy foods, why you were unable to engineer anything that felt like a moment of humanity. Consider the possibility that thinking of such moments as engineerable is the root of the problem. Consider the possibility that your questions sucked, that you should have offended her more. Decide to blame the context. There is undoubtedly some part of Diaz that needs to detach and float up to the ceiling or some other happy place in order to get through a day of junket interviews without feeling psychically brutalized. Read more.

Video of the Day:

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Author: "Max O'Connell"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 13:21
With "Guardians Of The Galaxy" set to open next week, Marvel's promo machine is going to start pivoting to their 2015 offerings, "Ant-Man" and "The Avengers: Age Of UItron." And given the expansive cast of the latter, it's no surprise that they've chose to drop two Comic-Con posters, highlight both the heroes and the villains of the tentpole sequel.

And so, some posters illustrated by Ryan Meinerding show Iron Man doing his best to fight off Ultron's army of robot baddies, while Scarlet Witch wields her power on the side of the bad guys. Who will win? Well folks, there can't be an "Avengers 3" if the good guys don't eventually save the day. But it looks like they'll have to put up a helluva fight.

"The Avengers: Age Of Ultron" arrives on May 1, 2015.
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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 13:00
As fanboys, comic book lovers and more descend upon San Diego for the start of Comic-Con today, it means a crushing rollout of teases, glimpses and hints of upcoming projects big and small. And certainly one of the most buzzed is Marvel's "Ant-Man" which finds the studio in a rare position of being on the back foot after the sudden departure of Edgar Wright. But fans shouldn't worry too much as apparently some of the visual sequences he dreamed up may be seen in new director Peyton Reed's movie.

Chatting with Slashfilm, Kevin Feige was asked if Wright had storyboarded his version of the movie and if some of those elements might be retained. "Yeah. It wasn’t the whole movie and there are new elements in the movie obviously, now, that [Wright] was not involved in," he explained. "But there are some segments that are awesome and will be brought to life in some incarnation. Peyton [Reed] certainly has all that material and is a talented enough and a secure enough guy to notice if something is really cool and go 'No reason to change that, that’s great.' Or if he’s got his own spin on something to go and adapt it from there."

It's an interesting response, and given that Reed is walking into a movie that has less than year now before it needs to be in the can and on the big screen, we'd wager he'll certainly be working from materials Wright left behind. We'll see how it turns out on July 17, 2015. Comic-Con poster below via EW
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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 12:35
The 71st Venice Film Festival today announced their lineup of 55 features, 20 of which are screening in competition, and all of which are world premieres. As previously announced, the festival is opening with Alejandro G. Inarritu's "Birdman or the Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance," starring Michael Keaton as a washed-up actor.

Competition highlights include David Gordon Green's "Manglehorn," starring Al Pacino; Ramin Bahrani's "99 Homes," starring Andrew Garfield; "The Look Of Silence," Joshua Oppenheimer's follow-up to his Oscar-nominated documentary "The Act of Killing"; "Pasolini," Abel Ferrera's film on the final days of Italian filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini, played in the film by Willem Dafoe; "Three Hearts," Benoît Jacquot's follow-up to his well-received "Farewell, My Queen;" and Andrew Niccol's "The Good Kill," starring Ethan Hawke.

READ MORE: Toronto International Film Festival Reveals First Slate of Titles: New Noah Baumbach and Jason Reitman Films Make Cut

Al Pacino also stars in Barry Levinson's "The Humbling," which is screening out of competition. Other titles in that section include Peter Bogdanovich's "She's Funny That Way," starring Jennifer Aniston and Owen Wilson; Joe Dante's latest, "Burying the Ex"; the director's cut of Lars von Trier's "Nymphomaniac Volume 2"; James Franco's adaptation of William Faulkner's novel, "The Sound and the Fury"; and Lisa Cholodenko's "Olive Kitteredge."

The Venice Film Festival runs August 27 to September 6. Below find the full lineup:

OFFICIAL COMPETITION:
"Three Hearts" (dir. Benoit Jacquot)
"Le Rancon De Glory" (dir. Xavier Beauvois)
"Le dernier coup de marteau" (dir. Alix Delaporte)
"Loin des hommes" (dir. David Oelhoffen)
"Birdman" (dir. Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu) (also opening film)
"99 Homes" (dir. Ramin Bahrani)
"The Good Kill" (dir. Andrew Niccol)
"Manglehorn" (dir. David Gordon Green)
"Pasolini" (dir. Abel Ferrera)
"Il giovane favoloso" (dir. Mario Martone)
"Anime nere" (dir. Francesco Munzi)
"Hungry Hearts" (dir. Saverio Costanzo)
"The Cut" (dir. Fatih Akin)
"A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence" (dir. Roy Andersson)
"The Look Of Silence" (dir. Joshua Oppenheimer)
"The Postman's White Nights" (dir. Andrej Konchalovsky)
"Fires On The Plain" (dir. Shinya Tsukamoto)
"Red Amnesia" (dir. Wang Xioshuai)
"Tales" (dir. Rakhshan Bani-Eternad)
"Sivas" (Kaan Mujdeci)

OUT OF COMPETITION:
"Words With Gods" (dir. Guillermo Arriaga, Emir Kusturica, Amos Gitai, Mira Nair, Warwick Thornton, Hector Babenco, Bahman Ghobadi, Hideo Nakata, Alex De La Iglesia)
"She's Funny That Way" (dir. Peter Bogdanovich)
"Dearest" (dir. Peter Ho-Sun Chan)
"Olive Kitteredge" (dir. Lisa Cholodenko)
"Burying The Ex" (dir. Joe Dante)
"Perez" (dir. Edoardo De Angelis)
"La Zuppa Del Demonio" (dir. Davide Ferrario)
"The Sound And The Fury" (dir. James Franco)
"Tsili" (dir. Amos Gitai)
"La Trattavita" (dir. Sabina Guzzanti)
"Make-Up" (dir. Kwontaek Im)
"The Humbling" (dir. Barry Levinson)
"The Old Man Of Belem" (dir. Manoel De Oliviera)
"Italy In A Day" (dir. Gabriele Salvatores)
"In The Basement " (dir. Ulrich Seidl)
"The Boxtrolls" (dir. Anthony Stacchi, Annable Graham)
"Nymphomaniac Volume 2: Director's Cut" (dir. Lars Von Trier)

HORIZONS:
"Theeb" (dir. Naji Abu Nowar)
"Line Of Credit" (dir. Salome Alexi)
"Senza Nessuna Pieta" (dir. Michele Alhaique)
"Cymbeline" (dir. Michael Almereyda)
"Io Sto Con La Sposa" (dir. Antonio Augugliaro, Gabriele Del Grande, Khaled Soliman Al Nassiry)
"La Vita Oscena" (dir. Renato De Maria)
"Near Death Experience" (dir. Benoit Delepine, Gustave Kervern)
"Realite" (dir. Quentin Dupieux)
"Goodnight Mommy" (dir. Veronika Franz, Severin Fiala)
"Hill Of Freedom" (dir. Hong Sang-Soo)
"Bypass" (dir. Duane Hopkins)
"the President" (dir. Mohsen Makhmalbaf)
"Your Right Mind" (dir. Ami Canaan Mann)
"Belluscone, Una Storia Siciliana" (dir. Franco Maresco)
"Nabat" (dir. Elchin Musaoglu)
"Heaven Knows What" (dir. Josh & Ben Safdie)
"These Are The Rules" (dir. Ognjen Svilicic)
"Court" (dir. Chaitanya Tamhane)

CLOSING FILM - out of competition:
"The Golden Era" (dir. Ann Hui)
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Author: "Nigel M Smith"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 12:27
It's like the metaphorical third date today for "Fifty Shades Of Grey" fans. The erotic bestseller is gearing up to hit a multiplex near you, and the first trailer has arrived today to give everyone a peek under the sheets (sorry) at what Christian Grey and Anastasia Steele will be getting up to. And recently, Jamie Dornan shared some his preparation in playing the billionaire who sets his eye on a literature student.

"I think there was so much more to Christian that we covered—someone who is careful to keep himself in shape, someone who spends obscene amounts of money on presenting himself," he told Interview. "A lot of that work was done in the gym and with costume. We didn't talk about particulars of the way he would move. But I'm quite awkward in a suit because I don't have an opportunity to wear a suit very often, and this is a guy who lives in a suit—the best suit. That has to have an effect. But when you end up in a suit for 80 percent of the filming process, you become pretty comfortable with it."

We're guessing the other 20% of the filming process involved him being naked in various capacities with Dakota Johnson. Anyway, feel the temperature rise with the trailer below. "Fifty Shades Of Grey" opens on February 13, 2015.

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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 12:13
How much more can you take? With the theatrical version of Lars von Trier's two part epic "Nymphomaniac" already sprawling over four hours, there's still his director's cut to contend with. The first volume of his uncensored vision debuted earlier this year at the Berlin Film Festival (our review), and now volume two heads to Venice and a new image and hilarious poster have arrived.

You already know that Charlotte Gainsbourg leads the star-studded dramatic journey through one woman's erotic life, but what you might not know is that Venice is actually screening both Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 director's cuts for a combined running time of 5 1/2 hours. Dang. Here's the synopsis: NYMPHOMANIAC is the wild and poetic story of a woman’s journey from birth to the age of 50 as told by the main character, the self-diagnosed nymphomaniac, Joe.

No word yet on when the director's cuts will make their way stateside, so for now, let this amazing one sheet hold you over.
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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 11:02
Some slight waves were made earlier this year when Fatih Akin pulled his forthcoming "The Cut" from the Cannes Film Festival citing "personal reasons." So we figured the movie would wind up somewhere else on the 2014 fall festival slate, and indeed, it's now at Venice and the first trailer has arrived.

Starring Tahar Rahim, details about the plot had largely been kept under the wraps, with only the only hint that Rahim plays a Charlie Chaplin-esque character, in the movie that caps off the director's “Love, Death and the Devil” trilogy. But not only does the promo open a window onto the movie, so too does the official synopsis (Google translated, but you'll get the gist of it): Mardin, 1915: One night, driving the Turkish Gendarmerie along all Armenian men. The young blacksmith Nazareth Manoogian is separated from his family. After he manages to survive the horror of the genocide, years later it reached the news that his twin daughters are alive. Owned rediscover the thought of her, he follows in their footsteps. They lead him from the deserts of Mesopotamia over Havana to the barren, lonely prairies of North Dakota. On his odyssey, he meets many different people, angelic and benevolent characters, but also the devil in human form. 

"The Cut" will screen in Competition, and the film runs 138 minutes long. Trailer below.

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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 10:41
Toronto unveiled their first wave of titles on Tuesday, and today it's Venice's turn, with the festival revealing what they'll be unspooling on the Lido. And as usual, it's an auteur heavy selection, but even we weren't expecting American horror legend Joe Dante to be given a slot. But it's a pleasant surprise.

Indeed, his upcoming "Burying The Ex" has nabbed an Out Of Competition slot. The horror comedy stars Anton Yelchin, Ashley Greene, Alexandra Daddario and Oliver Cooper, and it sounds like it'll be something a bit off the beaten path for those in Venice. Here's the official synopsis: Burying The Ex is an outrageous horror-comedy in which a young man's romance with his dream girl takes an unexpected turn when his dead ex-girlfriend rises from the grave... and thinks they are still dating!

Below you'll find new photos, a poster and a 5-minute behind-the-scenes featurette for Canal+ with interviews with Dante, footage from the production and more. No U.S. distribution yet for this one.

 
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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 09:30
It feels like film festival announcements get earlier and earlier every year. There's still a week of July left, and we've already had major announcements from TIFF, NYFF and even London and Tokyo (which don't happen until November, and will be opening with "The Imitation Game" and "Big Hero 6" respectively). But before any of those arrive, we've got the 71st Venice Film Festival, and after unveiling their big-ticket opener with Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's "Birdman," the rest of the line-up for the official competition was announced in Rome this morning.

Eagle-eyed festival-watchers will have guessed some of the bigger-name premieres from what were announced as North American premieres by TIFF, but to confirm, Andrew Niccol's "The Good Kill" with Ethan Hawke, David Gordon Green's "Manglehorn" starring Al Pacino, Ramin Bahrani's "99 Homes" with Andrew Garfield, and Abel Ferrera's "Pasolini" with Willem Dafoe all join "Birdman" as the big-ticket star-laden American pictures in competition. But arthouse fans may be happier that Roy Andersson's "A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence" is finally being unveiled, along with Fatih Akin's "The Cut," and, more surprisingly, Joshua Oppenheimer's "The Look Of Silence," the follow-up to the much-acclaimed "The Act Of Killing." Other competition highlights in a very French-and-Italian-centric year include Benoit Jacquot's "Three Hearts," "Of Gods And Men" helmer Xavier Beauvois' "Le Rancon De Glory," and Italian movie "Hungry Hearts," starring "Girls" actor Adam Driver.

Out of competition, Peter Bogdanovich returns with his comedy "She's Funny That Way" (formerly "Squirrel To The Nuts," starring Owen Wilson, Imogen Poots and Jennifer Aniston, while "The Kids Are All Right" helmer Lisa Chodolenko is back with her four-hour HBO miniseries "Olive Kitteredge." Joe Dante will also crop up with horror-comedy "Burying The Ex" starring Anton Yelchin, while in more literary departments, the omnipresent James Franco attempts William Faulkner's "The Sound And The Fury" with Jon Hamm, and Barry Levinson does Philip Roth's "The Humbling" with Al Pacino and Greta Gerwig. There's also be a premiere of Laika's animated "The Boxtrolls," the director's cut of the second volume of Lars Von Triers' "Nymphomaniac," and new films from Ulrich Seidl and Manoel De Olivera.

As for the Orrizonti side-bar, the starriest entry is Michael Almereyda's biker-gang Shakespeare adaptation "Cymbeline" starring Ed Harris, Ethan Hawke and Dakota Johnson, while there'll be a new feature from Korean favorite Hong Sang-Soo, and from DJ-turned-filmmaker Quentin Dupieux. British filmmaker Duane Hopkins follows up his "Better Things" with "Bypass," while Michael Mann's daughter Ami Canaan Mann returns to the festival with second feature "Your Right Mind," starring, uh, Katherine Heigl.

So yeah, no Terrence Malick ,but t'was always the way: there's a lot of depth to this line-up. Playlister Jessica Kiang is heading out to the Lido this year, so look out from our coverage when the festival's underway between August 27th and September 6th.

OFFICIAL COMPETITION:
"Three Hearts" (dir. Benoit Jacquot)
"Le Rancon De Glory" (dir. Xavier Beauvois)
"Le dernier coup de marteau" (dir. Alix Delaporte)
"Loin des hommes" (dir. David Oelhoffen)
"Birdman" (dir. Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu) (also opening film)
"99 Homes" (dir. Ramin Bahrani)
"The Good Kill" (dir. Andrew Niccol)
"Manglehorn" (dir. David Gordon Green)
"Pasolini" (dir. Abel Ferrera)
"Il giovane favoloso" (dir. Mario Martone)
"Anime nere" (dir. Francesco Munzi)
"Hungry Hearts" (dir. Saverio Costanzo)
"The Cut" (dir. Fatih Akin)
"A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence" (dir. Roy Andersson)
"The Look Of Silence" (dir. Joshua Oppenheimer)
"The Postman's White Nights" (dir. Andrej Konchalovsky)
"Fires On The Plain" (dir. Shinya Tsukamoto)
"Red Amnesia" (dir. Wang Xioshuai)
"Tales" (dir. Rakhshan Bani-Eternad)
"Sivas" (Kaan Mujdeci)

OUT OF COMPETITION:
"Words With Gods" (dir. Guillermo Arriaga, Emir Kusturica, Amos Gitai, Mira Nair, Warwick Thornton, Hector Babenco, Bahman Ghobadi, Hideo Nakata, Alex De La Iglesia)
"She's Funny That Way" (dir. Peter Bogdanovich)
"Dearest" (dir. Peter Ho-Sun Chan)
"Olive Kitteredge" (dir. Lisa Cholodenko)
"Burying The Ex" (dir. Joe Dante)
"Perez" (dir. Edoardo De Angelis)
"La Zuppa Del Demonio" (dir. Davide Ferrario)
"The Sound And The Fury" (dir. James Franco)
"Tsili" (dir. Amos Gitai)
"La Trattavita" (dir. Sabina Guzzanti)
"Make-Up" (dir. Kwontaek Im)
"The Humbling" (dir. Barry Levinson)
"The Old Man Of Belem" (dir. Manoel De Oliviera)
"Italy In A Day" (dir. Gabriele Salvatores)
"In The Basement " (dir. Ulrich Seidl)
"The Boxtrolls" (dir. Anthony Stacchi, Annable Graham)
"Nymphomaniac Volume 2: Director's Cut" (dir. Lars Von Trier)

ORRIZONTI:
"Theeb" (dir. Naji Abu Nowar)
"Line Of Credit" (dir. Salome Alexi)
"Senza Nessuna Pieta" (dir. Michele Alhaique)
"Cymbeline" (dir. Michael Almereyda)
"Io Sto Con La Sposa" (dir. Antonio Augugliaro, Gabriele Del Grande, Khaled Soliman Al Nassiry)
"La Vita Oscena" (dir. Renato De Maria)
"Near Death Experience" (dir. Benoit Delepine, Gustave Kervern)
"Realite" (dir. Quentin Dupieux)
"Goodnight Mommy" (dir. Veronika Franz, Severin Fiala)
"Hill Of Freedom" (dir. Hong Sang-Soo)
"Bypass" (dir. Duane Hopkins)
"the President" (dir. Mohsen Makhmalbaf)
"Your Right Mind" (dir. Ami Canaan Mann)
"Belluscone, Una Storia Siciliana" (dir. Franco Maresco)
"Nabat" (dir. Elchin Musaoglu)
"Heaven Knows What" (dir. Josh & Ben Safdie)
"These Are The Rules" (dir. Ognjen Svilicic)
"Court" (dir. Chaitanya Tamhane)

CLOSING FILM - out of competition:
"The Golden Era" (dir. Ann Hui)
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Author: "Oliver Lyttelton"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 22:36
Man, Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige wasn’t kidding when he said Marvel had mapped out their Marvel Cinematic Universe up through 2028.

While no titles have been revealed, tonight Marvel announced the dates for five new films with little information other than the company is clearly and confidently putting stakes in the ground for their future blockbusters.

What will the films be? Well, the company does love their mysterious placeholders. We do already know the third “Captain America” film lands on May 6, 2016 (the same date as “Batman V. Superman: Dawn of Justice) and following that are more unknowns: one on July 8, 2016 and another May 5, 2017. With the addition of the just-announced placeholders, this would mean Marvel will be releasing three films in 2017. Of course that's the year Warner Bros. plans to launch their "Justice League" movie—talk about boldly throwing down the gauntlet.

Many have speculated and assumed that one of those already announced dates is earmarked for “Dr. Strange” (which has a director and will probably announce its lead at Comic-Con) and the following summer 2017 date feels like “Avengers 3.” But beyond that for the summer 2017 through May 2019? Black Panther? "Guardians Of the Galaxy 2"? Solo films for other Avengers like Black Widow, Quicksilver and The Scarlett Witch or Hawkeye? At this point your speculation would be as good as ours, so have at it. New dates below (with previously announced dates for context) and maybe if you're lucky, more info will be revealed in San Diego next week. And read our relevant and related feature, Discuss: Is 23 29 Super Hero Movies Over The Next 4 Years Too Much?

7.23. 14  Update
: Did a contract become finalized that wasn't signed before? Nope. What happened was earlier today, during the announcement of their reshuffled "Spider-Man" release dates, Sony quietly dropped their "Amazing Spider-Man 4" date, originally set for May 4, 2018. Quickly realizing a prime, summer opening slot was now open, Marvel stepped and planted the flag on the date with another mystery movie. 

Guardians Of The Galaxy – August 1, 2014
Avengers: Age Of Ultron – May 1, 2015
Ant-Man – July 17, 2015
Captain America 3 – May 6, 2016
UNTITLED MARVEL FILM – July 8, 2016
UNTITLED MARVEL FILM – May 5, 2017

Newly announced dates:
UNTITLED MARVEL FILM – July 28, 2017
UNTITLED MARVEL FILM – November 3, 2017
UNTITLED MARVEL FILM – July 6, 2018
UNTITLED MARVEL FILM - May 4, 2018
UNTITLED MARVEL FILM – November 2, 2018
UNTITLED MARVEL FILM – May 3, 2019.
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Author: "Edward Davis"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 21:09
Through crowdfunding via Kickstarter, Hal Hartley was able to finish his "Henry Fool" trilogy -- it's taken seventeen years in total to make. The final installment, "Ned Rifle," will premiere at this year's Toronto International Film Festival.

Speaking to Indiewire last year, Hartley said "If I can raise all the money I need to raise my films by promising the audience the actual products, I'm 100% in control of the cash and that's great. There are fewer chefs in the kitchen."

READ MORE: Toronto International Film Festival Reveals First Slate of Titles: New Noah Baumbach and Jason Reitman Films Make Cut

The new trailer, released by Hartley himself, is certainly promising. Starring Liam Aiken, Aubrey Plaza, Parker Posey, James Urbaniak, and Thomas Jay Ryan, "Ned Rifle" follows on from the previous films, depicting Ned Rifle, son of the incarcerated Fay Grim and Henry Fool, as he ventures out on quest to kill his father.

Check out the trailer below:
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Author: "Oliver MacMahon"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 21:02
It's a good month to be a Jenny Lewis fan. The actress turned singer has a new album out next week, Voyager, and the first video featured none other than Kristen Stewart, Anne Hathaway and Brie Larson (watch it here). And already on VOD, and opening in theatres this weekend, is the indie "Very Good Girls," starring Elizabeth Olsen and Dakota Fanning, and featuring an original score by Lewis. In addition, the musician taught Olsen how to play "Go Ahead" by her former band Rilo Kiley for the film, and this new clip shows how it turned out.

"[Elizabeth Olsen] plays a young songwriter, so I chose a very old Rilo Kiley song for her to sing, because it felt conceivable that a young artist like her would write it," Lewis told Elle. "My friend Todd gave her guitar lessons, and she picked it up so fast! She’s a better finger-picker than I am now. I was embarrassed by the end of the film. I was like, 'Damn girl, you’re pushing it!' "

So, does Olsen have a potential music career in her? Check it out below along and compare to the original tune. [Pitchfork]
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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 20:31
Seed&Spark, the crowdfunding and streaming platform has partnered with Tugg Inc., the direct to theater distribution company, to organize a seminar on crowd funding for filmmakers. Called "Crowdfunding to Build Independence," the seminars will take place in cities around the country as well as film festivals including Las Vegas Film Festival, Hollyshorts Film Festivals, Vancuver International Film Festival, Flyway Film Festival and Austin Film Festival. 

"Crowdfunding is becoming a fundamental piece of the financing plan for independent film. However, many filmmakers miss both the opportunity to turn their funding campaign into an audience-building tool and the chance to use it as groundwork for theatrical distribution that they can control," said Emily Best, Founder and CEO of Seed&Spark. "Since the only proven path to true independence as an artist is a direct connection to your audience, we’re investing in the future of independence by helping filmmakers cultivate and grow that crucial connection from the initial idea for the film to the distribution and beyond."

READ MORE: 2014's Kickstarter Funded Films That Deserve Your Attention

The seminar seeks to provide attendees with insights on developing and distributing with the modern tool of crowdfunding. "A filmmaker's greatest asset," said Tugg CEO Nicolas Gonda, "is the community they foster. We're thrilled to be joining forces with Seed&Spark to evaluate what it takes for filmmakers to achieve real results through mass collaboration with their fans."
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Author: "Brandon Latham"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 20:18
When Marvel announced that "Slither" and "Super" director James Gunn would direct "Guardians Of The Galaxy," it was a surprising choice. Gunn was a filmmaker who preferred to deconstruct genres rather than play into the usual tropes, but it turns out that was exactly the kid of spirit Kevin Feige wants for the space adventure.

"There were scenes in his early draft...the scene that closed out the 17-minute [IMAX preview], when Peter Quill says ‘I have a plan…’ That scene was in an early draft. And that scene goes on. Just the five of them, sitting in the circle you see, for eight minutes just talking and bantering back-and-forth. And it’s awesome. It’s great," Feige told IGN. "My recollection is that in one of the early drafts we said ‘This scene is awesome—the whole movie should feel like this scene.’ And he went ‘Oh great, I was nervous about that scene. Because that scene is the most me, and I was afraid that you guys would say ‘Ooh that’s too long. Too much talking’.’ And we said ‘No, that’s great. That’s the movie. These characters.’ And I think that hit him more than I appreciated at the time, as an endorsement of his instincts and style."

And those qualities certainly seen in this latest clip, which takes a moment of danger, and turns it into an opportunity for Chris Pratt to turn on the charm, and spend a few moments quipping, and verbally tap-dancing his way around the scene. Very James Gunn. But how does the film hold up? Well, we'll have our full review soon, but our own Oliver Lyttelton saw the film, and he liked it quite a bit. See his brief thoughts on Twitter below, followed by the clip, new animated motion poster promo and Comic-Con poster.

"Guardians Of The Galaxy" opens on August 1st.  
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Author: "Kevin Jagernauth"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 20:02
Film Society of Lincoln Center announced today a retrospective of the career of scandalously dirty director John Waters titled, "Fifty Years of John Waters: How Much Can You Take?"

The retrospective will be the filmmakers first in the U.S. and will screen all 12 of his feature films, including his first to "Mondo Trash" and "Multiple Maniacs." The series will kick off with a special opening night presentation of Female Trouble followed by a discussion with John Waters and critic J. Hoberman.

READ MORE: John Waters on Hitchhiking Across America for 'Carsick': 'I think my street cred went up'

"A lifelong provocateur and by now a national treasure, John Waters is a singular, even prophetic figure within not only American cinema but also the broader landscape of American popular culture," said Dennis Lim, the Film Society's Director of Programming. "From his early underground sensations to his subversive work within the mainstream, no filmmaker has done as much to blur and challenge the distinctions between high and low culture, and between good and bad taste. To mark the 50th anniversary of his first film, the short 'Hag in a Black Leather Jacket' — made when he was only 18 — we are very proud to present this complete retrospective of his work, and also to have John, a world-class cinephile, curate a sidebar of films he wishes he'd made."

So is Waters excited? "Are you kidding?  I'm beyond excited!  It took me fifty years to claw my way up from the cinematic gutters of Baltimore to Lincoln Center.  Finally I'm filthy and respectable," he said.

And what John Waters retrospective wouldn't be complete without the use of our olfactory senses? Scratch-and-sniff Odorama cards will be handed out during the screening of "Polyester" so that the audience can smell everything that they see on screen. I think the combined response of "Ew!" and "Awesome!" are appropriate in that matter.

All of the films that will be featured in the retrospective are listen below along with their synopses, courtesy of Film Society of Lincoln Center. For tickets and further information, check out their website. Have fun everyone!

OPENING NIGHT
"Female Trouble"
John Waters, USA, 1974, 35mm, 89m
Waters's hysterical, full-throated assault on celebrity culture pivots on an unforgettable performance by Divine as Dawn Davenport, a runaway teen who falls into a life of petty thievery only to becomes a media icon with the help of a pair of sexually repressed, upper-crust hairdressers. Divine called Female Trouble his favorite of his own films, and it's not hard to see why: everything about the film, from the theme song down, is marked by his electric, gender-defying presence. (He also plays the male truck driver who, in one of the movie's most grotesque scenes, knocks Dawn up.) But it's the couple, played by David Lochary ("we rarely eat any form of noodle") and Mary Vivian Pearce ("spare me your anatomy"), who become both the chief targets of Waters's satire and, with their theory of beauty's relationship to transgression and crime, improbable mouthpieces for his filmmaking philosophy. With memorable turns by Mink Stole as Dawn's ill-fated daughter and Edith Massey as their hot-blooded next-door neighbor.
September 5, 6:30pm (discussion with John Waters and critic J. Hoberman)
September 10, 9:00pm
 
"Cecil B. Demented"
John Waters, USA, 2000, 35mm, 87m
"We ain't got no budget," goes a line in the tongue-in-cheek hip-hop theme song to Waters's freewheeling attack on the Hollywood star system. Stephen Dorff and Melanie Griffith star as, respectively, the leader of a guerrilla band of horny misfit filmmakers (the Sprocket Holes), and the A-list Hollywood star they kidnap and coerce, Patty Hearst–style, into a string of terrorist activities. (Hearst, in fact, had a cameo in the film, her fourth for Waters.) With its movie premiere abduction scene, its passages of show biz mayhem, and its bloody penultimate sequence—a shootout on the set of a Forrest Gump sequel—Cecil B. Demented is Waters's most extreme and sustained attempt to bite the hand that once fed him.
September 12, 7:00pm (discussion with John Waters)
 
"Cry-Baby"
John Waters, USA, 1990, 35mm, 85m
Johnny Depp—already a teen icon for playing the lead on TV's 21 Jump Street—appears as the titular bad-boy hero of Waters's raucous, exuberant salute to the teen rock 'n' roll films of the 1950s. What Hairspray had done for the message movie, Cry-Baby did for the likes of Rebel Without a Cause and Jailhouse Rock, with Depp playing a parentless, leather-jacketed "drape" (think "greaser") bent on edging out his high school's leading square for the affections of a beautiful, conflicted good girl (Amy Locane)—she too, in a typical Waters twist, orphaned under bizarre circumstances. Even when playing it soft, Waters never plays it straight, and Cry-Baby, for all its affectionate evocations of Baltimore's past, continues the director's fascination with the way people transform themselves (often grotesquely) for the sake of social acceptance, recognition, and fame. With supporting turns by Polly Bergen, Joe Dallesandro, Troy Donahue, Joey Heatherton, Traci Lords, Susan Tyrrell, and Iggy Pop.
September 13, 3:00pm
September 14, 8:00pm
 
"Desperate Living"
John Waters, USA, 1977, 35mm, 90m
Mortville—the fictional setting of Waters's mid-career masterpiece—is a dangerous place. Ruled by a despotic queen (Edith Massey) and her small army of leathered-up Nazi enforcers, overrun with ruin, dilapidation, and decay, and populated by a motley crew of outlaws and outcasts, it's a vision of what the world might look like if Waters were God. When two runaways, a mentally unstable suburban housewife (Mink Stole) and her obese maid (Jean Hill), disrupt the town's already unstable balance of power, chaos and revolution ensue. Amateur sex-change-operation reversals, attempts at biological warfare, cross-dressing highway patrolmen, butch-lesbian wrestlers, frozen babies, and nudist-colony digressions: Waters's first feature made without Divine or David Lochary—the latter passed away the year of the film's release—is a catalogue of horrors that veers between comedy and disgust, or, as Waters himself described it, "a fairy tale for fucked-up children."
September 7, 6:30pm
 
"A Dirty Shame"
John Waters, USA, 2004, 35mm, 89m
After taking on the suburban melodrama, the message picture, and the rock 'n' roll film, Waters tried his hand at making an old-fashioned sexploitation movie (the kind, he recalled, that "all the nuns told him he would go to hell" for watching). Tracey Ullman plays a frigid housewife who suffers a concussion that fills her with a sudden, extreme sexual appetite. Most of the movie's characters—including a voracious sex-addicted mechanic (Johnny Knoxville) and a go-go dancer with breasts the size of life rafts (Selma Blair)—follow suit, each developing their own peculiar (and, according to Waters, entirely genuine) fetish. A Dirty Shame has the encyclopedic, freak-show flair of Waters's earlier movies, coupled with the nostalgic tinge of his recent work—a fitting balance for the director's last completed film to date.
September 13, 5:00pm
 
"Hairspray"
John Waters, USA, 1988, 35mm, 92m
After spending six films and 20 years overturning the principles and conventions of his middle-class Catholic upbringing, Waters made this affectionate, PG-rated tribute to growing up in early-1960s Baltimore—and promptly became a crossover sensation. A bundle of narratives centered around Tracy (Ricki Lake), a heavyset teenager who dances a mean Limbo Rock, and her fight to integrate a local TV dance show—inspired by the real-life The Buddy Deane Show, which ended its run in 1964 after a series of NAACP protests—Hairspray proudly carried over the sharp-edged, often self-incriminating irony of Waters's earlier films. The movie's tone, on the other hand, was warmer, gentler, and more reflective than those movies ever would have allowed. What seemed like a new beginning for Waters turned out to be a farewell for Divine, whose dual role as both Tracy's mom and the TV station's bigoted owner was his final Dreamland screen performance.
September 7, 4:30pm
 
"Pecker"
John Waters, USA, 1998, 35mm, 87m
Waters's send-up of the New York art world is also a loving, detailed portrait of working-class life in Baltimore—where Waters, by the time of Pecker's production, had become a bona fide local hero—and a sort-of allegory for his own rise to fame. Edward Furlong plays an irrepressible teen photographer whose grainy snapshots of local outcasts unexpectedly make him and his girlfriend (Christina Ricci) heroes of the Manhattan cognoscenti (among them Cindy Sherman, playing herself). Whitney exhibits and magazine cover offers follow, but Pecker, in the end, stays true to his roots—in this case, his sister's gay strip club and his grandmother's talking statue of the Virgin Mary. At the time of its making, Pecker, despite Waters's public protests to the contrary, was likely the closest he had come to expressing his own attitude toward the Hollywood system that embraced him.
September 14, 4:00pm
 
"Pink Flamingos"
John Waters, USA, 1972, 35mm, 93m
The movie's long lineup of abuses—bestiality, indecent public exposure, cannibalism, sexual violence, forced impregnation, incest, castration, and, in the movie's infamous finale, on-screen coprophagia—made it an instant sensation on the midnight-movie circuit. But the story of ferocious trailer-park resident Babs Johnson (Divine) and her quest to upstage her neighbors as the "filthiest person alive" is, at its heart, a warped celebration of community and a showcase for Waters's particular brand of pitch-black humor. The result is a classic of transgressive cinema, less a scream against convention than a gleeful laugh in its face.
September 13, 9:15pm
September 14, 6:00pm
 
"Polyester"
John Waters, USA, 1981, 86m
For his typically subversive take on the Hollywood melodrama, Waters shifted his focus from Baltimore's urban crannies to its middle-class suburbs. Divine—in his penultimate performance for Waters—plays a sharp-nosed suburban housewife caught between the demands of her philandering porn-hawking husband, her go-go dancer daughter, and her glue-sniffing son, a foot-fetishist wanted for mangling the toes of a series of women. Her only solace is in the company of her old friend Cuddles (Edith Massey) and in her new covert romance with the dashing art-house movie theater owner Todd Tomorrow (Tab Hunter, a Hollywood star whose old-fashioned good looks make him hilariously—and pointedly—out of place among Waters's Dreamlanders). Presented in Odorama, a system Waters devised in which theatergoers were handed scratch-and-sniff cards to use during the film, Polyester is a key transitional film in Waters's career, and a pivotal entry in the history of the sordid-suburbia black comedy. (Todd Solondz, eat your heart out!)
Audience members will receive a free rare Odorama card to scratch and sniff their way through the film.
September 6, 7:30 pm 
 
"Serial Mom"
John Waters, USA, 1994, 35mm, 95m
In this scathing suburban satire—a kind of spiritual sequel to Polyester—Waters continued to develop his interest in unorthodox, tight-knit domestic groups, his obsession with the connections between cruelty, criminality, and fame, and his deep feeling for the closeness of humor to disgust. Serial Mom, like its immediate predecessors, was another polished Hollywood production, but with a harsher MPAA rating than Hairspray or Cry-Baby to go along with its edgier premise: a conscientious mother of two (Kathleen Turner, in a rafter-shaking performance) casually takes up serial murder out of a combination of boredom and mild irradiation at perceived slights and faux pas. The result is one of Waters's most sustained critiques of a world in which life is supposedly safe and secure—unless, that is, you wear white shoes after Labor Day.
September 5, 9:15pm (Introduction by John Waters)
September 6, 3:00pm
 

CELLULOID ATROCITY NIGHT!
 
Join us for a once-in-a-lifetime evening as John Waters presents his first two features, Mondo Trasho and Multiple Maniacs, along with early short The Diane Linkletter Story, all on 16mm. These exceedingly rare prints are from Waters's personal collection, and probably screening for the last time ever! Waters will be joined onstage for a conversation with critic Dennis Dermody. 
 
"Multiple Maniacs"
John Waters, USA, 1970, 16mm, 90m
Poised between the grimy black-and-white chaos of Mondo Trasho and the fierce, demented intelligence of Pink Flamingos, Waters's second feature is an equal-opportunity assault on conventional morality and the virtues of hippiedom. Divine is the haughty proprietress of a traveling freak show—"Lady Divine's Cavalcade of Perversions"—that exists as little more than an excuse for her and her lover (David Lochary) to rob and kill their bourgeois patrons. When her partner turns against her, she embarks on a dark night (and day) of the soul that includes a confrontation with the National Guard, a burst of cannibalism, a giant lobster, and a vision of the Stations of the Cross as only Waters could film them. For all its outré sacrileges, Multiple Maniacs ultimately arrives at its own kind of religious ecstasy.
+
"The Diane Linkletter Story"
John Waters, USA, 1970, 10m
The day after conservative radio host and TV celebrity Art Linkletter's 20-year-old daughter committed suicide, Waters whipped up—"by accident," he later said—this improvised, deliciously nasty satire of the girl's final days, with David Lochary and Mary Vivian Pearce as the victim's fretful parents and Divine as Diane.
+
"Mondo Trasho"
John Waters, USA, 1969, 16mm, 95m
Waters's first feature—a ragged, nearly dialogue-free fable shot guerrilla-style in the streets, alleyways, laundromats and immediate surroundings of Baltimore for just over $2,000—introduced moviegoers to his recurring company of players and caught his singular trash-opera style in full bloom. A mysterious blonde (Mary Vivian Pearce) passes through a series of nightmarish encounters with (among others) a foot fetishist, a diva with questionable driving skills seeking salvation (Divine), a topless tap dancer, a hacksaw-wielding mad scientist and his sickness-prone nurse, and, eventually, the Virgin Mary, accompanied by a soundtrack of traditional liturgical music, bells, whistles, moans, gossip, and prayers. Mondo Trasho's plot setup comes from a rich tradition of grimy women-in-trouble cult films, from Daughter of Horror toCarnival of Souls, but its skewed comic sensibility is all Waters's own.
September 11, 7:00pm (including a conversation between John Waters and Dennis Dermody)
  
SHORTS PROGRAM (FREE)
 
"Eat Your Makeup"
John Waters, USA, 1968, digital projection, 45m
Maelcum Soul—"the Kiki of Baltimore"—plays a governess who kidnaps young women and forces them to model themselves to death. Waters' first narrative short, also includes a 21-year old Divine doing his best Jackie Kennedy impersonation in a startling reenactment of John F. Kennedy's assassination.
 
"Hag in a Black Leather Jacket"
John Waters, USA, 1964, digital projection, 17m
In Waters's first short—shot on stolen 8mm film for $30 on his parents' rooftop when he was still a teenager, and screened precisely once after its completion—a wedding ceremony between an African-American man and a white ballerina performed by a Ku Klux Klan minister takes a turn for the surreal.
 
"Roman Candles"
John Waters, USA, 1966, digital projection, 40m
Under the influence of Warhol's Chelsea Girls, Waters designed this free-form, disruptive collage of image and sound to be triple-projected on three screens side by side.Roman Candles found Waters, then fresh out of film school, testing out a handful of techniques he'd refine in his first two features, not to mention working for the first time with many of the actors—Divine, David Lochary, Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce—who were constant presences in his life and work.
September 5, 4:00pm; September 6, 5:00pm and 9:30pm; September 7, 6:30pm and 8:30pm; September 11, 5:00pm
 
JOHN WATERS PRESENTS: "MOVIES I'M JEALOUS I DIDN'T MAKE"
 
Here they are—eight extreme, astoundingly perverse, darkly funny, and, most importantly, supremely surprising films that turn me green with envy. Every day I feel inadequate thinking of these fanatically obsessive, ludicrously sexual, unfathomably criminal, melodramatically misguided cinematic gems. Why oh why can't I make films like these—ones that jolted me out of all cinematic lethargy? Exploitation, art, horror? There's no such thing as genre when you've slipped to the other side of cinema-sanity. See for yourself the movies that drove me beyond the pale of normal movie madness. Jealousy over other directors' careers is a terrible thing to waste. — John Waters

"Before I Forget"
Jacques Nolot, France, 2007, 35mm, 108m
French with English subtitles
This wonderfully depressing movie about an older HIV-positive man is brave, funny, gayly incorrect, and smart as a whip. The shitting-in-your-pants-when-you-try-to-go-out-cruising scene is one I will never be able to shake.
September 14, 1:45pm
 
"Crash"
David Cronenberg, Canada/UK, 1996, 35mm, 100m
A hilariously brilliant and erotic movie about car crashes and the sexual cultists who fetishize them.
September 13, 7:00pm
 
"Final Destination"
James Wong, USA/Canada, 2000, 35mm, 98m
I'm a sucker for plane-crash scenes, and the opening of this "you can't cheat death" nail-biter was so suspenseful and horrifying that it spawned four sequels (all good, too!). You'll never tell anyone to "have a safe flight" again.
September 12, 9:30pm (introduction by John Waters)
 
"Killer Joe"
William Friedkin, USA, 2011, 35mm, 102m
The best Russ Meyer film of the decade—only it's directed by an 80-year-old William Friedkin, proving the adage "old chickens make good soup." Gina Gershon, your performance here shocked me raw!
September 7, 8:30pm
 
"The Mother"
Roger Michell, USA, 2003, 35mm, 112m
A recently widowed grandmother turns horny and has a secret affair with her daughter's much younger, loutish boyfriend (played by pre-Bond Daniel Craig). Gerontophilia never seemed so exciting.
September 6, 5:00pm
 
"Night Games"
Mai Zetterling, Sweden, 1966, 35mm, 105m
Swedish with English subtitles
The Swedish art shocker that made board member Shirley Temple Black quit the San Francisco International Film Festival in protest over their refusal to pull it from the screening schedule.
September 6, 9:30pm
 
"Of Unknown Origin"
George P. Cosmatos, Canada/USA, 1983, 35mm, 88m
The best rat movie ever. Period. End of discussion.
September 10, 7:00pm
 
"Thérèse"
Alain Cavalier, France, 1986, 35mm, 94m
French with English subtitles
The insane life of nutcase Saint Theresa, told in a haunting, minimalist way. Yes, she was in love with Jesus—but does that make her a bad person? Catholic lunacy at its most disturbing.
September 7, 2:30pm
 
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Author: "Casey Cipriani"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 20:00
It’s a dystopian near-future, water has run dry and America’s in a debilitating drought. That’s what sets the stage for Jake Paltrow’s new picture “Young Ones.” But it’s actually from many accounts, including our own review, more of a morality drama with a patriarchal struggle for power. The movie stars Michael Shannon as a father trying to protect his land and family. His children are played by Elle Fanning and Kodi Smit-McPhee, and Nicholas Hoult plays a young man with his eye on more than just the previous land the father owns.

We described it as having both Spielberg-ian and Bresson-ian elements to it—the latter expressed through a dilapidated anthropomorphic robot perhaps not unlike the poor donkey in “Au Hasard Balthazar.” And I dunno about you, but any movie that can carefully balance those two filmmakers successfully is something I’d wanna see.

The movie will be released via Screen Media, and hit U.S. theaters on October 17th. A new trailer has arrived too and you can watch that below. If you’re very curious, make sure to check out the two, already-released international trailers as well. [Vulture]

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Author: "Edward Davis"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 19:28
Today, IFP announced its 2014 slate of 133 new films in development selected for its esteemed Project Forum at Independent Film Week.

The program brings the international film and media community to New York City to advance new projects and support the future of storytelling, by nurturing the work of both emerging and established independent artists and filmmakers. Through the Project Forum, creatives connect with the financiers, executives, influencers and decision-makers in film, television, new media and cross-platform storytelling that can help them complete their latest works and connect with audiences. Under the curatorial leadership of Deputy Director/Head of Programming Amy Dotson & Senior Director of Programming Milton Tabbot, the event takes place September 14-18, 2014, at Lincoln Center.

“As we set to embark on our 36th Independent Film Week, we are humbled by the outstanding slate of both U.S. and international projects selected for this year’s Project Forum,” said Joana Vicente, Executive Director of IFP. “We know that the industry will be as impressed as we are with the accomplished storytellers and their diverse and boundary pushing films.”

Highlights from this year's selection, with respect to this blog's interests (given its stated mission) include:

  1. "Big Man" directed and written by Rashaad Ernesto Green, produced by Reinaldo Marcus Green. An aging powerlifter from the South Bronx attempts to break the world record in bench press. (Drama)
  2. "Afronauts" directed and written by Frances Bodomo, cinematography by Joshua Richards. At the height of the U.S./U.S.S.R. space race, the Zambia Space Academy also hopes to put its “spacegirl” Matha Mwamba on the moon. (Historical Fiction)
  3. "Black Sunshine" written and directed by Akosua Adoma Owusu, produced by Akosua Adoma Owusu and Julio Chavezmontes and executive produced by Lisa Cortes. A young Albino girl tries to balance her life between her demanding mother and her rejecting environment, a mythical reality is presented to her, but the path it leads to might be darker than she thinks. (Supernatural Thriller)
  4. "Dara Ju" written and directed by Anthony Onah, produced by Anthony Onah, Justin Begnaud, Catherine Davila and Daniel Davila, and Kishori Rajan. A young Nigerian-American financier struggles with love, family, and a prescription drug dependency as his ambitions steer him down a criminal path. (Drama)
  5. "Moonlight" written and directed by Barry Jenkins, produced by Adele Romanski. Two Miami boys navigate the temptations of the drug trade and their burgeoning sexuality in this triptych drama about black queer youth. (Drama)
  6. "Mothership: The Untold Story of Women and Hip Hop" directed by Lisa Cortés, written by Bill Adler, and produced by Tony Gerber and Lynn Nottage. An intimate look at the ups and downs of the women of hip-hop, narrated in the first-person by a handful of the women — artists and executives — who have done much more than most to shape the culture during the last 30 years.
There certainly could be others of note on the lengthy list of over 100 feature projects (fiction and non-fiction) selected for this year's program. But these are the 6 that I immediately recognized - the titles and/or the filmmaker's name, or both.

I'll scrub the list for others, and profile each in separate posts in the future, once I have more information about them all - specifically those we haven't already covered on this blog.

The full list of the 2014 selected projects follows below:

Afronauts directed and written by Frances Bodomo, cinematography by Joshua Richards. At the height of the U.S./U.S.S.R. space race, the Zambia Space Academy also hopes to put its “spacegirl” Matha Mwamba on the moon. (Historical Fiction)

All That We Love directed by Yen Tan, written by Yen Tan and Clay Liford, produced by Jonathan Duffy and Kelly Williams. The death of a beloved pet compels a middle-aged man to examine the fragility of his present relationships. (Drama)

Big Man directed and written by Rashaad Ernesto Green, produced by Reinaldo Marcus Green. An aging powerlifter from the South Bronx attempts to break the world record in bench press. (Drama)

Chickenshit directed and written by Jessica dela Merced, produced by Gigi Dement and Elena Engel. After her father dies in a fire in Detroit, a young girl schemes to capture the arsonists responsible with the help of her misfit friends. (Coming of Age)

Colony directed and written by Pulkit Datta. Against the backdrop of heated elections, five residents of a middle-class Delhi neighborhood confront their secrets and desires, jeopardizing the future of their community forever. (Drama)

Dust directed by Will Joines, written by Karrie Crouse. Trapped by increasingly horrific dust storms, a young mother haunted by the past becomes convinced that a mysterious presence is threatening her family. (Dramatic Thriller)

Freeland directed and written by Mario Furloni and Kate McLean. A wayward daughter returns to her aging mom’s marijuana farm and is forced to confront dangerous truths in order to save her childhood home. (Drama)

Glass directed and written by Lily Baldwin, produced by Ariana Garfinkel, Nancy Schafer, and Kim Sherman. Fantasism and the corrosive seduction of being seen: “Glass,” a visceral, true-crime thriller about a schizophrenic stalker and an unguarded dancer in our privacy-gone world.(Dramatic Thriller)

Gordon directed and written by Laura Moss, produced by Forest Conner. The story of a misdiagnosed sociopath and his attempts to date women without killing them. (Dark Comedy)

Jonathan directed by Bill Oliver, written by Bill Oliver and Peter Nickowitz. A young man falls in love and begins to expand his life, despite an unusual condition in which he shares a body with his brother. (Drama)

Ladyworld directed and written by Amanda Kramer, produced by Laura Heberton and Kim Sherman. Nine teenage girls at a birthday party at an isolated country house slowly turn on one another after they are trapped by a massive earthquake. (Dramatic Thriller)

Likable Characters directed by Street Phillips, written by Teddy Wayne and Amber Dermont, produced by Streeter Phillips and Marjon Javadi. A successful young male novelist, struggling to write his next book, spends the summer at an artists’ colony and falls under the spell of a slightly older and wiser female writer. (Coming of Age

My Bare Hands directed and written by Joshua Sternfeld. A twenty-something slacker must return home for a week, to care for his father who has Alzheimer’s disease. Father and son battle for point-of-view of the story’s reality. (Fantasy)

Oscillate Wildly directed by Travis Mathews, written by Travis Mathews and Keith Wilson, produced by Travis Mathews and Andrew Carlberg, cinematography by Keith Wilson. When his disability check arrives much reduced, a hot-headed young gay man with cerebral palsy must confront the disability he’s let define his whole being. (Drama)

Palimpsest directed by Michael Tyburski, written by Michael Tyburski and Ben Nabors, produced by Ben Nabors. Peter, a successful House Tuner who calibrates the sounds of people’s homes, meets Ellen, a client whose problem he cannot solve. (Drama)

Penny directed by John Dilley, written by John Dilley and Seth Corr. Forced to hire a wildly optimistic recovering addict, a cynical HR rep takes it upon herself to prevent him from relapsing into destructive old habits. (Comedy)

Untitled China Revolution Movie written by Colin Jones and Alison Klayman, Directed by Alison KlaymanA young American working for a Chinese actress becomes entangled in the relationships and catastrophes on the set of a blockbuster film shooting in China.

www.rachelormont.com directed and written by Peter Vack. Rachel was sold into product assessment slavery where her job is to analyze Jacob Performance, the most famous teenage pop star in the world. (Drama)

RBC’S Emerging Storytellers

Web Storytellers Spotlight

Home Page 
written by Emma Needleman, directed by Paul Gale, and produced by Amanda Warman.Recent college grad Reed wants to make a billion dollar smartphone app, but first he has to win over a pair of tough potential investors: his parents. (Comedy- Web Series)

Middle Americans directed, produced, and edited by Rachel Morgan, written by Rachel Morgan and Sarah Tyler. Determined to find her missing father, Aslaug Slaug travels to North Dakota with her temperamental friend who’s obsessed with becoming an exotic dance superstar. (Comedy)

Origin of Shame written and directed by Desiree Akhavan, produced by Elisabeth Holm and Susan Leber. Mining the most absurd stories inspired by Desiree Akhavan’s most delightfully absurd adolescence, ORIGIN OF SHAME follows Desiree’s shame spiral toward (kinda) understanding sex. (Animation)

Red Clay directed and written by Mark Ennis, produced by Kent Kirkpatrick. On a remote reservation on the US/ Mexico border, a tight knit group of Native mobsters make a devil’s pact with a Mexican cartel. (Mystery/Crime Thriller)

Slow Blood directed and written by Calvin Reeder. A supernatural comedy about a rodeo clown who falls in love with a prostitute at an occultist brothel. (Dark Comedy)

Understudies directed by Daniel Zimbler, written by Elisabeth Gray and Daniel Zimbler, produced by Rob Cristiano, executive produced by Daniel Zimbler and Elisabeth Gray, cinematography by Lance Kaplan. It’s showtime for failing actress Astoria Bagg when she lands a life-changing role in Broadway’s “Twilight at Tiffany’s.” But as Astoria soon discovers, big breaks aren’t always what they seem… (Comedy)

Zero Point directed by Gregory Bayne, written and produced by Gregory Bayne and Christian Lybrook. When children begin dying mysteriously, Dr. Alex Embry, driven by a hidden tragedy, becomes obsessed with finding the cause. (Sci-Fi)


Independent Filmmaker Labs

A yearlong mentorship program supporting 20 U.S. first-features in post-production through completion, marketing and distribution.

Documentary Labs

The Dream of the Audience: Theresa Hak Kyung Cha 
directed by Woo Jung Cho, produced by Woo Jung Cho and Cindy Yoon. An artist transcends her profound sense of displacement by re-imagining home as a dream space where she and her audience can collaborate in storytelling.

Mad Tiger directed by Jonathan Yi and Michael Haertlein and produced by Josh Koury.Best friends, Yellow and Red, tour the United States in a Japanese performance-art punk band. Their relationship is tested when Red quits after fifteen years.

Man of the Monkey directed by David Romberg, written by Betsy Kagen, and produced by Robert Girvin. A filmmaker’s journey to a remote Brazilian island to search for the story of a scary man living in isolation with his chimpanzee wife.

Quest: The Fury and the Sound directed and produced by Jonathan Olshefski. A family running a hip hop studio from their North Philadelphia home struggles against apathy, addiction, and violence as they strive to inspire their community.

Romeo is Bleeding directed by Jason Zeldes and produced by Michael Klein. A young poet, Donte Clark, pits his artistic ambitions against the harsh realities of his notoriously violent hometown, Richmond, CA.

The Seventh Fire directed by Jack Pettibone Riccobono; written by Jack Pettibone Riccobono and Shane Slattery-Quintanilla; produced by Jack Pettibone Riccobono, Jihan Robinson, Joey Carey, and Shane Slattery-Quintanilla; and executive produced by Natalie Portman, Chris Eyre, Gavin Dougan, Sydney Holland, Erik Fleming, Stefan Nowicki, and Lonnie Anderson. An Ojibwe community in rural Minnesota is caught between the violent rise of Native American gangs and the struggle for cultural identity.

(T)error directed by David Felix Sutcliffe and Lyric Cabral; produced by David Felix Sutcliffe, Lyric Cabral, and Christopher St. John; and executive produced by Eugene Jarecki. (T)error is the first film to explore an active counterterrorism investigation, from the perspective of the suspect and the informant assigned to set him up.

T-Rex directed by Zackary Canepari and Drea Cooper; produced byZackary Canepari, Drea Cooper, and Sue Jaye Johnson; and executive produced by Zackary Canepari and Drea Cooper. A documentary about seventeen-year-old Claressa “T-Rex” Shields, from Flint, MI, who became the first woman to win the middleweight gold medal in Olympic boxing.

Very Semi-Serious directed by Leah Wolchok, produced by Leah Wolchok and Davina Pardo, and executive produced by Deborah Shaffer. Very Semi-Serious is an offbeat meditation on humor, art and the genius of the New Yorker cartoon.

Where The Marsh Meets The Lake (working title) directed by Sharon Shattuck and produced by Martha Shane and Sharon Shattuck. Her wedding approaching, the director returns home to ask her transgender father, Trisha, and her straight-identified mother, Marcia, how their love survived against all odds.

Narrative LabsBeatbox written by Andrew Dresher, directed by Andrew Dresher, produced byJon FurayChip Hourihan, and Adam Penenberg. A down-on-his-luck musician charts a new path when he is introduced to a group of Brooklyn beatboxers. (Musical)

Christmas, Again written by Charles Poekel, directed by Charles Poekel, produced byClare Paterson. Neighborhood encounters and a mysterious woman force a lonely Christmas tree salesman to confront his past. (Drama)

Embers written by Claire Carré and Charles Spano, directed by Claire Carré, produced by Charles Spano and Melvut Akkaya. After a global epidemic, those who remain search for meaning and connection in a world without memory. (Sci-Fi)

Jackrabbit written by Carleton Ranney and Destin Douglas, directed by Carleton Ranney, produced by Destin Douglas, Rebecca Rose Perkins and Joe Stankus. A computer prodigy joins forces with a solitary hacker in order to uncover the dangerous truth behind their friend’s mysterious suicide (Sci-Fi).

Only A Switch written and directed by Michael Vincent, produced by Chadd Harbold and Jenn Wexler, executive produced by Peter Phok and Jacob Jaffke. Two lovers are on the run in this psychedelic fairytale that blurs lines of sexuality and identity. (Fantasy)

Out of My Hand written by Donari Braxton, directed by Takeshi Fukunaga, produced by Donari Braxton. A struggling Liberian rubber plantation worker risks everything to discover a new life as a yellow cab driver in New York City. (Drama)

Some Beasts written by Cameron Nelson and directed by Cameron Nelson, produced by Courtney Ware and Ashley Maynor. A young farmhand, fleeing his past, finds refuge in the hills of Appalachia where an elderly recluse and a feral child haunt the savage wild. (Dramatic Thriller)

Songs My Brothers Taught Me written and directed by Chloe Zhao, produced by Mollye Asher, Nina Yang Bongiovi, Angela Lee, and Forrest Whitaker. A spirited Lakota girl’s faith in her family and community is tested when her brother threatens to leave the only place they’ve ever known.

Take Me To The River written, directed and produced by Matt Sobel. A teenager’s plan to come out at the family reunion gets derailed when a bloodstain on his cousin’s dress makes him the suspect of abuse. (Drama)

Those People written and directed by Joey Kuhn, produced by Joey Kuhn, Kimberly Parker, Sarah Perlman Bremmner. A young painter is torn between a lifelong obsession with his infamous best friend and a promising new romance with an older, foreign pianist. (Drama)

No Borders International Co-Production Market

The premiere U.S. forum for buyers, sales agents and financiers to meet with established producers who have a strong track record for producing films in the international marketplace. All 38 projects have at least 20% financing in place, as well as some cast and/or principal attachments.


A Paso de Mangles written by Gloria La Morte and Paola Mendoza, directed by Paola Mendoza, produced by Gloria La Morte and Johnny Hendrix, and executive produced by Liz Manne. The story of three women in a small town on the Pacific Coast of Colombia whose interlocking stories shed light on the horrific reality of sexual assault in Colombia’s decades long armed conflict. (Drama)

Away from Everywhere directed by Justin Simms, produced by Barbara Doran, Michael Dobbin and Brad Gover, written by Mark Hoffe. A struggling writer emerges from rehab and reunites with his estranged brother, but soon descends into a tragic love triangle and is forced to confront a devastating reality. (Drama)

Black Sunshine written and directed by Akosua Adoma Owusu, produced by Akosua Adoma Owusu and Julio Chavezmontes and executive produced by Lisa Cortes. A young Albino girl tries to balance her life between her demanding mother and her rejecting environment, a mythical reality is presented to her, but the path it leads to might be darker than she thinks. (Supernatural Thriller)

Children of the Fall written and directed by Eitan Gafney, produced by Yafit Shalev. Rachel Strode is a young, American woman with a dark secret in her past, who comes to Israel in the fall of 1973 to volunteer in a Kibbutz. What begins as a time of fun and celebration of youth turns into a menacing and bloody night of terror that will give a new meaning to Yom Kippur. (Horror)

Corpse Men produced by Isaac Moganjane and John Volmink. A team of soldiers is sent into an abandoned Middle-Eastern village to rescue one of their own. During their search, they unearth an ancient and terrifying force. (Horror)

The Cycle written by Sara Ishaq, directed by Musa Syeed, produced by Sara Ishaq and Nicholas Bruckman. A Yemeni teenager builds a motorcycle to track down his father’s killer, breaking tribal law and risking a war to get his revenge. (Dramatic Thriller)

Dara Ju written and directed by Anthony Onah, produced by Anthony Onah, Justin Begnaud, Catherine Davila and Daniel Davila, and Kishori Rajan. A young Nigerian-American financier struggles with love, family, and a prescription drug dependency as his ambitions steer him down a criminal path. (Drama)

Dead, End or: How I Learnt to Stop Living and Love Being Officially Dead written and directed by Dev Benegal, produced by Dev Benegal and Satish Kaushik and executive produced by Aseem Chhabra. A man who is declared dead by the shady Governor of Departments (GoD) has to fight to prove he’s still alive. (Comedy)

Family written and directed by Veronica Kedar,produced by Mosh Danon. Home is where the hurt is and Lily Brooke will do anything to make it go away. (Drama)

Fish written and directed by Esset Akçilad, produced by Sara Merih Ertas and Engin Yenidünya. Living in pre-furnished, identical looking flats, the lives of residents of Kader Apartmani (Destiny Building) are about to radically change when 8 year old Akin and his family move in to the building.(Drama)

Francis Turnbull written by David Schwab, directed by Terry George, produced by Wren Arthur and Oren Moverman. 1963. Cape Canaveral. As his parent’s marriage falls apart, 15-year-old, barely four foot tall Francis Turnbull sets off to find a miracle cure to help him grow (Drama)

In the Shade of the Trees written and directed by Matias Rojas Valencia, produced by Giancarlo Nasi. Thinking of a better future, a boy is enrolled by his peasant mother in a mysterious boarding school for German settlers, not knowing that he will be the victim of one of the darkest chapters in the recent history of Chile. (Drama)

Keep Them From the Wolves written and directed by Ryan O’Nan, produced by Erika Milutin, Dori Sperko and Joseph Restaino, executive produced by Randall Emmett. A young man, terrified of being a father, is forced to care for a 6-year-old Croatian girl that he is told is his daughter. (Coming of Age)

La Barracuda written by Jason Cortlund, directed by Jason Cortlund and Julia Halperin, produced by David Hartstein and Laura Heberton, and executive produced by Bruce Beresford. A strange woman comes to Texas to meet her half-sister and stake a claim to the family’s outlaw music legacy –one way or another. (Thriller)

Level 16 written and directed by Danishka Esterhazy, produced by Stéphanie Chapelle, Liz Jarvis, Judy Holm and Michael McNamara. In a repressive boarding school, two sixteen year old girls struggle to uncover the reasons for their imprisonment and try to find a means of escape. (Thriller)

Lily of the Valley written and directed by Delphine Gleize, produced by Jerome Dopffer. The tale of twin sisters who meet who meet for the first time at 40 years old and learn, unwittingly, to become absolutely inseparable. (Comedy)

Los Valientes written and directed by Aurora Guerrero, produced by Chad Burris. A gay, undocumented Latino finds love and hope in the most unlikely of places – the very world he believes he can never be himself. (Drama)

Mantra – The Song of Scorpions written and directed by Anup Singh, produced by Saski Vischer. Twenty-three year old Nooran is a singer, a scorpion healer and a medicine woman. Living a free-spirited, independent life, Nooran suffers a calculated, violent attack that sets her on a mystical journey to avenge her and find the song that will heal her. (Drama)

Marjoun and the Flying Headscarf written and directed by Susan Youssef, produced by Susan Youssef and Man Kit Lam, executive produced by Charlie Dibe and Frans Van Gestel. With her father imprisoned on terrorist-related charges, a teenage in Arkansas searches for identity in her headscarf and a motorcycle. (Coming of Age)

The Men From the Water produced by Frederico Esteban, directed by Fernando Lopez. In the middle of a war zone, Víctor Erralde begins a quest through the dead, looking the meaning of his own life. (Drama)

Microchip Blues written and directed by Aaron Beckum, produced by Riel Roch Decter and Sebastian Pardo. Fed up with his mundane existence working at the microchip factory, Jimmy teams up with a washed up mystic scientist to build the world’s fastest microchip, win back his girlfriend and save his factory from going quantum. (Comedy)

Modern Primitives produced, written and directed by Michael Wechsler, executive produced by Wendy Pronin Herst, Rick Porras, Khush Singh and Shawn Singh. A sick young man with overbearing parents falls in love with his beautiful neighbor but their romance becomes increasingly turbulent as the convictions of her past life as a polar bear become stronger. (Drama)

MOM written and directed by Jacob Chase, produced by Jennifer Dubin, Jenny Jue and Cora Olson. After Marion is confronted with the loneliness of her only child growing up and becoming a new parent himself, she does what any rational mom would do: she kidnaps her grandson to raise as her own. (Thriller)

Monos written and directed by Alejandro Landes and Alexis Dos Santos, produced by Fernando Epstein. On a faraway Colombian mountaintop, eight kids with guns carry out a mission: watching over a hostage and a milk cow. (Dramatic Thriller)

Moonlight written and directed by Barry Jenkins, produced by Adele Romanski. Two Miami boys navigate the temptations of the drug trade and their burgeoning sexuality in this triptych drama about black queer youth. (Drama)

Natural Justice written by Dennis Venter, directed by Thaddeus O’Sullivan, produced by Roberta Durrant. Set in South Africa, an Irish AWOL soldier on the run from the law risks his anonymity to assist an overzealous policewoman solve a child trafficking case. (Thriller)

Nessun Dorma written by Matteo Servente and Melissa Sweazy, directed by Matteo Servente, produced by Matteo Servente and Ryan Watt. An imaginative 11-year-old boy barrels into a rural town in a stolen Trans-Am, upending the routines of a widowed police dispatcher and a secretive barber. (Drama)

Overlap written by Lisa Rubin, directed by Brooke Sebold, produced by Susan Stover. OVERLAP centers on two women in crisis – one straight, one lesbian – who begin a passionate and addictive sexual affair, escaping their mundane lives and long-standing relationships. (Drama)

Oyster written and directed by Alistair Banks Griffin, produced by Alistair Banks Griffin and executive produced by Eric Overmeyer. Twenty-year-old Therese struggles to save her debt-ridden oystering family from destruction after the man who she was arranged to marry dies unexpectedly. (Thriller)

Patti Cake$ written and directed by Geremy Jasper, produced by Dan Janvey and Michael Gottwald. Patricia Dombrowski, aka Patti Cake$, aka White Trish, is a big girl with big dreams of rap superstardom. Stuck in Lodi , New Jersey, Patti battles an army of haters as she strives to break the mold and take over the rap game. (Coming of Age)

Salvation produced, written and directed by Carmen Sangion. A young man searches for his estranged sister, a stripper reconnects with her abandoned son and a doubtful priest is forced to confront his past. (Drama)

Seeds written by Steve Weisman and Owen Long, directed by Owen Long, produced by Chris Haney, Anthony Ambrosino and Steve Weisman. When his increasingly depraved behavior spirals out of control, eccentric billionaire Marcus Milton retreats to his family home along the New England coast. But instead of finding solace, Marcus is haunted by his darkest fears and deepest desire. (Horror)

Shale written and directed by Jed Cowley,produced by Traci Carlson and Kate Allgood Cowley, executive produced by Giles Andrew. A submissive 70 year-old housewife makes the terrifying decision to leave her domineering husband after 50 years of marriage and faces the consequences that follow. (Drama)

Sin Muertos No Hay Carnaval written by Andres Crespo, directed by Sebastian Cordero and produced by Arturo Yepez, directed by Sebastian Cordero and. A suspenseful thriller about a former wealthy young man whose only financial resource to give his family an honorable life is a piece of land where 150 poor families have settled. He will have to confront his own morality as he finds himself in a corrupt and violent world. (Thriller)

Strange Things Started Happening written and directed by Stacie Passon, produced by Mary Jane Skalski. A woman who has agreed to take in her grandson in his last year of high school becomes increasingly worried that the boy poses a threat to her and her elderly husband. (Thriller)

Tarda Primavera written and directed by Michelangelo Frammartino, produced by Marta Donzeli. After watching the strange event of a whale’s stranding, an old Pinocchio begins to remember and have dreams of his past. (Fantasy/Transmedia).

We The Animals written by Jeremiah Zagar and Dan Kitrosser, directed by Jeremiah Zagar, and produced by Jeremy Yaches. Based on the bestselling novel by Justin Torres, We the Animals is about the brutal love of a multi-racial working class family, seen through the eyes of the youngest son, as he discovers his heritage, his sexuality and his madness. (Coming of Age)

Wounded written and directed by Maxwell McGuire, produced by Michael Dobbin. On a remote hunting trip, a military veteran and his son witness a fatal gunshot, spiraling into a life or death battle for survival. (Thriller)

Spotlight on Documentaries

Presenting 50 documentary features ranging from an early financing stage (i.e. early development/production) to those nearing completion (i.e. in postproduction or at the rough cut stage), this section includes emerging and established filmmakers in non-fiction.


#Single: girl behind the camera directed and produced by Paula Schargorodsky, written by Paula Schargorodsky and Julieta Steinberg, and executive produced by Julie Goldman.
An Argentine woman shares her intimate search for love, answers and happiness: must she settle down or remain a free spirit in order to be happy?

500 Years directed by Pamela Yates and produced by Paco de Onís. The first trial in history to judge the genocide of indigenous peoples in the Americas unleashes a battle for the soul and destiny of a nation.

Almost Sunrise directed by Michael Collins and produced by Marty Syjuco. Almost Sunrise is the inspiring story of two friends, ex-soldiers, who embark on an epic journey across America to heal from war.

American Warlord directed and produced by Tony Gerber, written by Johnny Dwyer, and executive produced by Johnny Dwyer and Lynn Nottage. The story of Charles Taylor’s American-born son’s transformation from American teen with hip-hop ambitions to one of his father’s most feared enforcers in Liberia’s civil war.

Big Sonia directed by Leah Warshawski and Todd Soliday and produced by Leah Warshawski. “National treasure,” local celebrity, Holocaust Survivor – Sonia (88) grapples with retirement from John’s Tailoring, the last shop standing in a giant dying suburban mall.

The Bill (working title) directed, written, and produced by Ramona Diaz. The Bill is set in the Philippines, one of the world’s poorest and most populous countries, and its struggles with reproductive health policy—in the legislature, where laws are debated, and in a hospital, the busiest maternity ward on the planet.

The Birth of Saké directed by Erik Shirai and produced by Makoto Sasa. A small group of workers must brave unusual working conditions to bring to life a 2,000 year old tradition known as saké. Surrounded by 1,000 competitors, Yoshida must surface as a worthy contender in a market overrun by choices.

Blunderbust directed by Michael Dweck and produced by Michael Dweck, Ben Correale, and Gregory KershawBlunderbust is the story of a small town American racetrack fighting for survival when land hungry corporations come to town.

Boone directed by Christopher LaMarca and executive produced by Laurie Collyer. Booneexplores the unsentimental journey of three young goat farmers and the gritty, complex reality of living off the land.

¡Brimstone and Glory! directed by Viktor Jakovleski and produced by Benh Zeitlin, Dan Janvey, and Affonso Goncalves. ¡Brimstone and Glory! is an immersive look at the National Pyrotechnic Festival in Tultepec, Mexico, an event that combines monumental fireworks with conflagrant celebration.

Care directed by Deirdre Fishel and produced by Tony Heriza. Nearly everyone will eventually need elder care, but can we count on it? Care reveals how our broken system is failing both elders and caregivers.

A Family Affair directed and written by Tom Fassaert, produced by Wout Conijn and Sigrid Dyekjær, and executive produced by Wout Conijn. What to do with a grandmother who wants to sleep with you?

Forever Pure directed by Maya Zinshtein, produced by Geoff Arbourne, and executive produced by John Battsek. Beitar Jerusalem Football Club is on dangerous ground as they fight to keep their club “forever pure.”

Gennadiy directed by Steve Hoover and produced by Danny Yourd. Gennadiy spent years rescuing drug-addicted kids from Mariupol’s streets, using any means necessary. But Ukraine’s civil unrest could threaten everything that he has fought for.

The Guys Next Door directed and produced by Amy Geller and Allie Humenuk. Two girls, gay dads, a surrogate and donor eggs – a poignant and amusing family portrait that explores what factors influence who we become.

HAVEABABY.COM directed by Amanda Micheli, produced by Amanda Micheli and Serin Marshall, and executive produced by Julie Goldman. Some think an in vitro fertilization contest sounds crazy, but for countless Americans desperate to start a family, this social media sweepstakes is their only hope.

Hondros: A Life in Frames directed and written by Greg Campbell and produced by Mike Shum and Daniel Junge. A journey to the world’s most dangerous places to uncover the surprising and poignant details of the life and career of late photojournalist Chris Hondros.

The Jerusalem Syndrome directed by Beth Earl and produced by Tim Williams. The line between religious belief and insanity begins to blur when 12 psychotic patients enter a community house in Jerusalem.

Just Kids directed and written by Tamar Tal and produced by Tamar Tal, Hilla Medalia, and Neta Zwebner-Zaibert. Three Italian-born Israeli brothers who had long gone their separate ways search for the cave that saved their lives during the Holocaust, uncovering forgotten truths and discovering secrets about each other and themselves along the way.

Kiryas Joel directed by Jesse Sweet and produced by Hannah Olson. Kiryas Joel chronicles a year-in-the-life of the controversial Hasidic community, Kiryas Joel, New York. To outsiders, it’s a small-town theocracy; to insiders, it’s Judaism’s best hope.

Land of Songs directed by Aldona Watts and produced by Aldona Watts and Julian Watts. In a region of Lithuania known as the “Land of Songs,” five grandmothers may be the last voices of their village’s ancient folk singing tradition.

Les Blank: A Quiet Revelation directed, written, and produced by Gina Leibrecht and executive produced by Harrod Blank. Les Blank: A Quiet Revelation will reveal the creative force behind this legendary filmmaker and how he used film as a means to express those things he loved most about the world — all the while preserving this national treasure’s legacy for generations to come.

Lucchy directed and written by Pablo Levinas and Mark Monroe and produced by Daniel Chalfen and Mark Monroe. The devastating effect of American immigration policy is exposed when a child guitar prodigy’s rock and roll road-trip across the USA takes a tragic turn.

Madina’s Dream directed by Andrew Berends and produced by Mariah Wilson. An unflinching glimpse into Sudan’s growing humanitarian crisis through the stories of both rebels and refugees fighting for their lives on the country’s embattled border.

Maya Angelou: The People’s Poet directed by Bob Hercules and Rita Coburn Whack. The People’s Poet is the first feature documentary to tell the full story of the remarkable writer, performer, activist Maya Angelou.

Mothership: The Untold Story of Women and Hip Hop directed by Lisa Cortés, written by Bill Adler, and produced by Tony Gerber and Lynn Nottage. An intimate look at the ups and downs of the women of hip-hop, narrated in the first-person by a handful of the women — artists and executives — who have done much more than most to shape the culture during the last 30 years.

The Movie About Anna directed by Alexandra Sichel and Elizabeth Giamatti and produced by Elizabeth Giamatti. Filmmaker Alex Sichel creates a fictional alter ego, played by Lili Taylor, who teaches her how to navigate gracefully through life with an incurable disease.

The Newark Project: Safe Passage directed by Derek Koen and produced by Ouida Washington. Six students in Newark, New Jersey struggle to build a future as one of the most troubled cities in America tries to fix a “failing” education system.

No Le Digas a Nadie (Don’t Tell Anyone) directed by Mikaela Shwer and produced by Katie O’Rourke and Alexandra Nikolchev. As the “Dear Abby” of the undocumented community, Angy Rivera steps out of the shadows with young immigrant activists to claim their future in America.

Nuns On The Bus directed by Melissa Regan and produced by Melissa Regan, Ariana Garfinkel, and Todd Shaiman. Sister Simone Campbell leads a bold group of rebel nuns on a road trip for justice, compassion, and community.

NUTS! The Brinkley Story directed by Penny Lane and produced by Penny Lane and Caitlin Mae Burke. NUTS! The Brinkley Story is the mostly-true story of John Romulus Brinkley, who in 1917 discovers that he can cure impotence by transplanting goat testicles into men. After that, the story only gets weirder…

Obit directed, written, and produced by Vanessa Gould and executive produced by Sally Rosenthal. LIFE ON THE DEAD BEAT: an inside look at the famed New York Times obituary writers as they reflect on death, deadlines and the cycles of life.

Old South directed and produced by Danielle Beverly and executive produced by Marco Williams. Two Southern communities steeped in history – one black, one white – collide while striving to keep their respective legacies relevant in a changing America.

The Patriarch directed and written by Danae Elon and produced by Danae Elon and Paul Cadieux. A mysterious and dark story that delves into a closed world of monastic faith.

Phantom Cowboys directed by Daniel Patrick Carbone and Annie Waldman and produced by Annie Waldman and Ryan Scafuro. A portrait of the social and geographical landscape of small town America, through the eyes of the teenage boys who call these places home.

A Photographic Memory directed by Rachel Seed and produced by Rachel Seed and Jessica Wolfson. A photographer goes on a transformative journey to learn about her late mother by revisiting the same iconic photographers her mother interviewed in the 1970s.

Pizarro directed by Simon Hernandez Estrada and produced by Christian Bitar Giraldo. This film follows the personal quest of a woman to reconstruct her life and the life of her father, in order to reconcile with him.

Return to Timbuktu directed by Michael Meredith, produced by Alex Gibney, T Bone Burnett, and Amit Nizan, and executive produced by Wim Wenders. Return to Timbuktu is a documentary about a daring musical quest to restore the soul of a war-torn nation.

The Sensitives directed by Drew Xanthopoulos and produced by David Hartstein. Set in remote American edgelands, The Sensitives captures the exodus from mainstream society of those fleeing the toxic triggers of a debilitating and taboo illness.

The Settlers directedand written by Shimon Dotan, produced by Shimon Dotan and Jonathan Aroch, and executive produced by Charles Ferguson. With unprecedented access, The Settlersoffers the first ever comprehensive look at the Israeli settlement phenomenon from its dramatic origins right up until today.

The Silence of Others directed, written, and produced by Robert Bahar and Almudena Carracedo. After decades of silence, lawyers and victims attempt to bring crimes of Spain’s 40-year Franco dictatorship before a court for the first time in history.

The Silk Railroad directed by Martin DiCicco and produced by Martin DiCicco and Kakha Matcharashvili. Wealth, opportunity, and discord collide along the route of a railroad being constructed between Europe and Asia.

Supergirl directed by Jessie Auritt and produced by Jessie Auritt, Carmen Osterlye, and Justin Levy. Naomi Kutin seems like a typical eleven-year-old Orthodox Jewish girl. Watching her deadlift 265 pounds at an international powerlifting competition tells a different story.

Thank You for Playing directed, written, and produced by David Osit and Malika Zouhali-Worrall. Ryan, an indie video game developer, is creating a poetic video game to document his experiences raising Joel, his 5-year-old son who has terminal cancer.

Three Days To See directed by Garrett Zevgetis; produced by Ariana Garfinkel, Jeff Consiglio, and Jordan Salvatoriello; and executive produced by Kevin Bright. A passionate young woman, who is legally blind and diagnosed with autism, charts an unexpected course toward adulthood, love, and her own sense of identity.

Through You Princess directed and written by Ido Har and produced by Liran Atzmor. Samantha could never even imagine that someone is listening to her on the other side of the world. Kutiman is inspired by her songs, and he’s about to increase the numbers who likes her music in ways that she can’t even imagine.

The Trials of Spring directed by Gini Reticker, produced by Beth Levison and Razan Ghalayini, and executive produced by Gini Reticker, Abigail Disney, and Zainab Salbi. Against the backdrop of the Arab uprisings, The Trials of Spring features women from the region who risk everything to fight for human rights.

Trophy directed by Shaul Schwarz and produced by Jay Van Hoy, Lars Knudsen, Lauren Haber, Lucas Ochoa, and Julia Nottingham. Thousands of endangered African animals are killed each year. Most are poached for the black market, but many are hunted legally on luxury safari trips.Trophy looks beyond these controversial practices at what motivates a person’s need to possess, consume, or display these majestic creatures.

Uncle Howard directed and written by Aaron Brookner, produced by Aaron Brookner and Paula Vaccaro, and executive produced by Jim Jarmusch. Burroughs: the Movie launched the career of filmmaker Howard Brookner; 25 years later his nephew seeks to discover Brookner’s work and the legacy of a life cut short by the plague of AIDS.

Welcome to Leith directed and produced by Michael Nichols and Christopher Walker and executive produced by Jenner Furst and Joey Carey. Oil + Ghost Town = Takeover.

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Author: "Tambay A. Obenson"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 19:19
We here at Women and Hollywood are always interested in new data that reveals where women stand in the film industry. Today, Stephen Follows, a producer and writer in the UK, released a new study called Gender Within Film Crews, and not surprisingly, men dominate most positions.

This data wonk took the 100 top-grossing films at the US box office over the last 20 years -- 2,000 films in all -- broke down all the crew positions, and discovered that women make up a paltry 22.6% of people behind the camera. And sadly, the number in 2013, at 21.8%, is lower than the average of the past twenty years. What this clearly shows is that opportunities for women working behind the scenes in film has not increased over two decades and, in many places, the number has gone down.

Mr. Follows, who blogs about film data each week, painstakingly went through each crew position, and the data tells us that certain departments, like camera, electrical, sound, and special effects, hire mostly men, while other departments like makeup, costumes, and casting hire more women. But all in all, men outnumber women across the board. (Caveat: I take a bit of an issue with including the "thanks" section as a crew department.)

Other facts of note:

  • Musicals have more women on the crew and action films have less. 
  • Opportunities for women as directors, writers and producers have decreased over the two decades.
  • Women went from 0% cinematographers to only 2% -- fucking awful.
  • Tina Fey will save the world. Mean Girls had the highest amount of female crew members in the last 20 years -- 42% -- and Steven Segal's On Deadly Ground had the least -- 10%. 
  • All of the films that were most popular with men were written and directed by men.
  • 42% of the films that were most popular with women were written by women.
  • Women go to see more romances, comedies and dramas; men go to see more action, thrillers and sci- fi.

This data shows what we all know already, that serious work needs to be done in the hiring stage and that people need to work much much harder to have gender diversity on their crews. These numbers are just brutal, and people who work in this business should be very concerned that women are being shut out of so many positions.
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Author: "Melissa Silverstein"
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Date: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 19:03

Um, were not sure it gets any better than this: The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced today that it will present "Fifty Years of John Waters: How Much You Take?" -- a complete retrospective of the legend's work -- from September 5-14, 2014.

The retrospective will include all 12 Waters features, a special "scentsational" odorama screening of "Polyester," free screenings of rare shorts, and a special sidebar "John Waters Presents: Movies I'm Jealous I Didn't Make."

What's more: Waters will be making appearances throughout the series!

Said Waters in an official statement: “Are you kidding?  I’m beyond excited!  It took me fifty years to claw my way up from the cinematic gutters of Baltimore to Lincoln Center.  Finally I’m filthy and respectable!”
 
Check out the full schedule below and start clearing your early September schedules:

FILMS, SCHEDULE & DESCRIPTIONS
 
OPENING NIGHT
Female Trouble
John Waters, USA, 1974, 35mm, 89m
Waters’s hysterical, full-throated assault on celebrity culture pivots on an unforgettable performance by Divine as Dawn Davenport, a runaway teen who falls into a life of petty thievery only to becomes a media icon with the help of a pair of sexually repressed, upper-crust hairdressers. Divine called Female Trouble his favorite of his own films, and it’s not hard to see why: everything about the film, from the theme song down, is marked by his electric, gender-defying presence. (He also plays the male truck driver who, in one of the movie’s most grotesque scenes, knocks Dawn up.) But it’s the couple, played by David Lochary (“we rarely eat any form of noodle”) and Mary Vivian Pearce (“spare me your anatomy”), who become both the chief targets of Waters’s satire and, with their theory of beauty’s relationship to transgression and crime, improbable mouthpieces for his filmmaking philosophy. With memorable turns by Mink Stole as Dawn’s ill-fated daughter and Edith Massey as their hot-blooded next-door neighbor.
September 5, 6:30pm (discussion with John Waters and critic J. Hoberman)
September 10, 9:00pm
 
Cecil B. Demented
John Waters, USA, 2000, 35mm, 87m
“We ain’t got no budget,” goes a line in the tongue-in-cheek hip-hop theme song to Waters’s freewheeling attack on the Hollywood star system. Stephen Dorff and Melanie Griffith star as, respectively, the leader of a guerrilla band of horny misfit filmmakers (the Sprocket Holes), and the A-list Hollywood star they kidnap and coerce, Patty Hearst–style, into a string of terrorist activities. (Hearst, in fact, had a cameo in the film, her fourth for Waters.) With its movie premiere abduction scene, its passages of show biz mayhem, and its bloody penultimate sequence—a shootout on the set of aForrest Gump sequel—Cecil B. Demented is Waters’s most extreme and sustained attempt to bite the hand that once fed him.
September 12, 7:00pm (discussion with John Waters)
 
Cry-Baby
John Waters, USA, 1990, 35mm, 85m
Johnny Depp—already a teen icon for playing the lead on TV’s 21 Jump Street—appears as the titular bad-boy hero of Waters’s raucous, exuberant salute to the teen rock ’n’ roll films of the 1950s. What Hairspray had done for the message movie, Cry-Baby did for the likes of Rebel Without a Cause and Jailhouse Rock, with Depp playing a parentless, leather-jacketed “drape” (think “greaser”) bent on edging out his high school’s leading square for the affections of a beautiful, conflicted good girl (Amy Locane)—she too, in a typical Waters twist, orphaned under bizarre circumstances. Even when playing it soft, Waters never plays it straight, and Cry-Baby, for all its affectionate evocations of Baltimore’s past, continues the director’s fascination with the way people transform themselves (often grotesquely) for the sake of social acceptance, recognition, and fame. With supporting turns by Polly Bergen, Joe Dallesandro, Troy Donahue, Joey Heatherton, Traci Lords, Susan Tyrrell, and Iggy Pop.
September 13, 3:00pm
September 14, 8:00pm
 
Desperate Living
John Waters, USA, 1977, 35mm, 90m
Mortville—the fictional setting of Waters’s mid-career masterpiece—is a dangerous place. Ruled by a despotic queen (Edith Massey) and her small army of leathered-up Nazi enforcers, overrun with ruin, dilapidation, and decay, and populated by a motley crew of outlaws and outcasts, it’s a vision of what the world might look like if Waters were God. When two runaways, a mentally unstable suburban housewife (Mink Stole) and her obese maid (Jean Hill), disrupt the town’s already unstable balance of power, chaos and revolution ensue. Amateur sex-change-operation reversals, attempts at biological warfare, cross-dressing highway patrolmen, butch-lesbian wrestlers, frozen babies, and nudist-colony digressions: Waters’s first feature made without Divine or David Lochary—the latter passed away the year of the film’s release—is a catalogue of horrors that veers between comedy and disgust, or, as Waters himself described it, “a fairy tale for fucked-up children.”
September 7, 6:30pm
 
A Dirty Shame
John Waters, USA, 2004, 35mm, 89m
After taking on the suburban melodrama, the message picture, and the rock ’n’ roll film, Waters tried his hand at making an old-fashioned sexploitation movie (the kind, he recalled, that “all the nuns told him he would go to hell” for watching). Tracey Ullman plays a frigid housewife who suffers a concussion that fills her with a sudden, extreme sexual appetite. Most of the movie’s characters—including a voracious sex-addicted mechanic (Johnny Knoxville) and a go-go dancer with breasts the size of life rafts (Selma Blair)—follow suit, each developing their own peculiar (and, according to Waters, entirely genuine) fetish. A Dirty Shame has the encyclopedic, freak-show flair of Waters’s earlier movies, coupled with the nostalgic tinge of his recent work—a fitting balance for the director’s last completed film to date.
September 13, 5:00pm
 
Hairspray
John Waters, USA, 1988, 35mm, 92m
After spending six films and 20 years overturning the principles and conventions of his middle-class Catholic upbringing, Waters made this affectionate, PG-rated tribute to growing up in early-1960s Baltimore—and promptly became a crossover sensation. A bundle of narratives centered around Tracy (Ricki Lake), a heavyset teenager who dances a mean Limbo Rock, and her fight to integrate a local TV dance show—inspired by the real-life The Buddy Deane Show, which ended its run in 1964 after a series of NAACP protests—Hairspray proudly carried over the sharp-edged, often self-incriminating irony of Waters’s earlier films. The movie’s tone, on the other hand, was warmer, gentler, and more reflective than those movies ever would have allowed. What seemed like a new beginning for Waters turned out to be a farewell for Divine, whose dual role as both Tracy’s mom and the TV station’s bigoted owner was his final Dreamland screen performance.
September 7, 4:30pm
 
Pecker
John Waters, USA, 1998, 35mm, 87m
Waters’s send-up of the New York art world is also a loving, detailed portrait of working-class life in Baltimore—where Waters, by the time of Pecker’s production, had become a bona fide local hero—and a sort-of allegory for his own rise to fame. Edward Furlong plays an irrepressible teen photographer whose grainy snapshots of local outcasts unexpectedly make him and his girlfriend (Christina Ricci) heroes of the Manhattan cognoscenti (among them Cindy Sherman, playing herself). Whitney exhibits and magazine cover offers follow, but Pecker, in the end, stays true to his roots—in this case, his sister’s gay strip club and his grandmother’s talking statue of the Virgin Mary. At the time of its making, Pecker, despite Waters’s public protests to the contrary, was likely the closest he had come to expressing his own attitude toward the Hollywood system that embraced him.
September 14, 4:00pm
 
Pink Flamingos
John Waters, USA, 1972, 35mm, 93m
The movie’s long lineup of abuses—bestiality, indecent public exposure, cannibalism, sexual violence, forced impregnation, incest, castration, and, in the movie’s infamous finale, on-screen coprophagia—made it an instant sensation on the midnight-movie circuit. But the story of ferocious trailer-park resident Babs Johnson (Divine) and her quest to upstage her neighbors as the “filthiest person alive” is, at its heart, a warped celebration of community and a showcase for Waters’s particular brand of pitch-black humor. The result is a classic of transgressive cinema, less a scream against convention than a gleeful laugh in its face.
September 13, 9:15pm
September 14, 6:00pm
 
Polyester
John Waters, USA, 1981, 86m
For his typically subversive take on the Hollywood melodrama, Waters shifted his focus from Baltimore’s urban crannies to its middle-class suburbs. Divine—in his penultimate performance for Waters—plays a sharp-nosed suburban housewife caught between the demands of her philandering porn-hawking husband, her go-go dancer daughter, and her glue-sniffing son, a foot-fetishist wanted for mangling the toes of a series of women. Her only solace is in the company of her old friend Cuddles (Edith Massey) and in her new covert romance with the dashing art-house movie theater owner Todd Tomorrow (Tab Hunter, a Hollywood star whose old-fashioned good looks make him hilariously—and pointedly—out of place among Waters’s Dreamlanders). Presented in Odorama, a system Waters devised in which theatergoers were handed scratch-and-sniff cards to use during the film, Polyester is a key transitional film in Waters’s career, and a pivotal entry in the history of the sordid-suburbia black comedy. (Todd Solondz, eat your heart out!)
Audience members will receive a free rare ODORAMA card to scratch and sniff their way through the film.
September 6, 7:30 pm 
 
Serial Mom
John Waters, USA, 1994, 35mm, 95m
In this scathing suburban satire—a kind of spiritual sequel to Polyester—Waters continued to develop his interest in unorthodox, tight-knit domestic groups, his obsession with the connections between cruelty, criminality, and fame, and his deep feeling for the closeness of humor to disgust. Serial Mom, like its immediate predecessors, was another polished Hollywood production, but with a harsher MPAA rating than Hairspray or Cry-Baby to go along with its edgier premise: a conscientious mother of two (Kathleen Turner, in a rafter-shaking performance) casually takes up serial murder out of a combination of boredom and mild irradiation at perceived slights and faux pas. The result is one of Waters’s most sustained critiques of a world in which life is supposedly safe and secure—unless, that is, you wear white shoes after Labor Day.
September 5, 9:15pm (Introduction by John Waters)
September 6, 3:00pm
 

CELLULOID ATROCITY NIGHT!
 
Join us for a once-in-a-lifetime evening as John Waters presents his first two features, Mondo Trasho and Multiple Maniacs, along with early short The Diane Linkletter Story, all on 16mm. These exceedingly rare prints are from Waters's personal collection, and probably screening for the last time ever! Waters will be joined onstage for a conversation with critic Dennis Dermody. 
 
Multiple Maniacs
John Waters, USA, 1970, 16mm, 90m
Poised between the grimy black-and-white chaos of Mondo Trasho and the fierce, demented intelligence of Pink Flamingos, Waters’s second feature is an equal-opportunity assault on conventional morality and the virtues of hippiedom. Divine is the haughty proprietress of a traveling freak show—“Lady Divine’s Cavalcade of Perversions”—that exists as little more than an excuse for her and her lover (David Lochary) to rob and kill their bourgeois patrons. When her partner turns against her, she embarks on a dark night (and day) of the soul that includes a confrontation with the National Guard, a burst of cannibalism, a giant lobster, and a vision of the Stations of the Cross as only Waters could film them. For all its outré sacrileges, Multiple Maniacs ultimately arrives at its own kind of religious ecstasy.
+
The Diane Linkletter Story
John Waters, USA, 1970, 10m
The day after conservative radio host and TV celebrity Art Linkletter’s 20-year-old daughter committed suicide, Waters whipped up—“by accident,” he later said—this improvised, deliciously nasty satire of the girl’s final days, with David Lochary and Mary Vivian Pearce as the victim’s fretful parents and Divine as Diane.
+
Mondo Trasho
John Waters, USA, 1969, 16mm, 95m
Waters’s first feature—a ragged, nearly dialogue-free fable shot guerrilla-style in the streets, alleyways, laundromats and immediate surroundings of Baltimore for just over $2,000—introduced moviegoers to his recurring company of players and caught his singular trash-opera style in full bloom. A mysterious blonde (Mary Vivian Pearce) passes through a series of nightmarish encounters with (among others) a foot fetishist, a diva with questionable driving skills seeking salvation (Divine), a topless tap dancer, a hacksaw-wielding mad scientist and his sickness-prone nurse, and, eventually, the Virgin Mary, accompanied by a soundtrack of traditional liturgical music, bells, whistles, moans, gossip, and prayers. Mondo Trasho’s plot setup comes from a rich tradition of grimy women-in-trouble cult films, from Daughter of Horror to Carnival of Souls, but its skewed comic sensibility is all Waters’s own.
September 11, 7:00pm (including a conversation between John Waters and Dennis Dermody)
 
 
SHORTS PROGRAM (FREE)
 
Eat Your Makeup
John Waters, USA, 1968, digital projection, 45m
Maelcum Soul—“the Kiki of Baltimore”—plays a governess who kidnaps young women and forces them to model themselves to death. Waters’ first narrative short, also includes a 21-year old Divine doing his best Jackie Kennedy impersonation in a startling reenactment of John F. Kennedy’s assassination.
 
Hag in a Black Leather Jacket
John Waters, USA, 1964, digital projection, 17m
In Waters’s first short—shot on stolen 8mm film for $30 on his parents’ rooftop when he was still a teenager, and screened precisely once after its completion—a wedding ceremony between an African-American man and a white ballerina performed by a Ku Klux Klan minister takes a turn for the surreal.
 
Roman Candles
John Waters, USA, 1966, digital projection, 40m
Under the influence of Warhol’s Chelsea Girls, Waters designed this free-form, disruptive collage of image and sound to be triple-projected on three screens side by side. Roman Candles found Waters, then fresh out of film school, testing out a handful of techniques he’d refine in his first two features, not to mention working for the first time with many of the actors—Divine, David Lochary, Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce—who were constant presences in his life and work.
September 5, 4:00pm; September 6, 5:00pm and 9:30pm; September 7, 6:30pm and 8:30pm; September 11, 5:00pm
 

JOHN WATERS PRESENTS: “MOVIES I’M JEALOUS I DIDN’T MAKE”
 
Here they are—eight extreme, astoundingly perverse, darkly funny, and, most importantly, supremely surprising films that turn me green with envy. Every day I feel inadequate thinking of these fanatically obsessive, ludicrously sexual, unfathomably criminal, melodramatically misguided cinematic gems. Why oh why can’t I make films like these—ones that jolted me out of all cinematic lethargy? Exploitation, art, horror? There’s no such thing as genre when you’ve slipped to the other side of cinema-sanity. See for yourself the movies that drove me beyond the pale of normal movie madness. Jealousy over other directors’ careers is a terrible thing to waste. — John Waters

Before I Forget
Jacques Nolot, France, 2007, 35mm, 108m
French with English subtitles
This wonderfully depressing movie about an older HIV-positive man is brave, funny, gayly incorrect, and smart as a whip. The shitting-in-your-pants-when-you-try-to-go-out-cruising scene is one I will never be able to shake.
September 14, 1:45pm
 
Crash
David Cronenberg, Canada/UK, 1996, 35mm, 100m
A hilariously brilliant and erotic movie about car crashes and the sexual cultists who fetishize them.
September 13, 7:00pm
 
Final Destination
James Wong, USA/Canada, 2000, 35mm, 98m
I’m a sucker for plane-crash scenes, and the opening of this “you can’t cheat death” nail-biter was so suspenseful and horrifying that it spawned four sequels (all good, too!). You’ll never tell anyone to “have a safe flight” again.
September 12, 9:30pm (introduction by John Waters)
 
Killer Joe
William Friedkin, USA, 2011, 35mm, 102m
The best Russ Meyer film of the decade—only it’s directed by an 80-year-old William Friedkin, proving the adage “old chickens make good soup.” Gina Gershon, your performance here shocked me raw!
September 7, 8:30pm
 
The Mother
Roger Michell, USA, 2003, 35mm, 112m
A recently widowed grandmother turns horny and has a secret affair with her daughter’s much younger, loutish boyfriend (played by pre-Bond Daniel Craig). Gerontophilia never seemed so exciting.
September 6, 5:00pm
 
Night Games
Mai Zetterling, Sweden, 1966, 35mm, 105m
Swedish with English subtitles
The Swedish art shocker that made board member Shirley Temple Black quit the San Francisco International Film Festival in protest over their refusal to pull it from the screening schedule.
September 6, 9:30pm
 
Of Unknown Origin
George P. Cosmatos, Canada/USA, 1983, 35mm, 88m
The best rat movie ever. Period. End of discussion.
September 10, 7:00pm
 
Thérèse
Alain Cavalier, France, 1986, 35mm, 94m
French with English subtitles
The insane life of nutcase Saint Theresa, told in a haunting, minimalist way. Yes, she was in love with Jesus—but does that make her a bad person? Catholic lunacy at its most disturbing.
September 7, 2:30pm
 
 
Public Screening Schedule
 
Screening Venues:
The Film Society of Lincoln Center
Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th Street
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, 144 West 65th Street
 
Friday, September 5
4:00PM Shorts Program: Eat Your Makeup (45m) + Hag in a Black Leather Jacket (17m) + Roman Candles (40m)
6:30PM OPENING NIGHT: Female Trouble (89m) + Discussion with John Waters and J. Hoberman
9:15PM Serial Mom (95m) + Introduction by John Waters
 
Saturday, September 6
3:00PM Serial Mom (95m)
5:00PM The Mother (112m)
5:00PM and 9:30PM Shorts Program: Eat Your Makeup (45m) + Hag in a Black Leather Jacket (17m) + Roman Candles (40m)
7:30PM Polyester (86m)
9:30PM Night Games (105m)
 
Sunday, September 7
2:30PM Thérèse (94m)
4:30PM Hairspray (92m)
6:30PM Desperate Living (90m)
6:30PM and 8:30PM Shorts Program: Eat Your Makeup (45m) + Hag in a Black Leather Jacket (17m) + Roman Candles (40m)
8:30PM Killer Joe (102m)
 
Wednesday, September 10
7:00PM Of Unknown Origin (88m)
9:00PM Female Trouble (89m)
 
Thursday, September 11
5:30PM Shorts Program: Eat Your Makeup (45m) + Hag in a Black Leather Jacket (17m) + Roman Candles (40m)
7:00PM Celluloid Atrocity Night: Multiple Maniacs (90m) + The Diane Linkletter Story (10m) + Mondo Trasho (95m) + Conversation with John Waters & Dennis Dermody
 
Friday, September 12
7:00PM Cecil B. Demented (87m) + Discussion with John Waters
9:30PM Final Destination (98m) + Introduction by John Waters
 
Saturday, September 13
3:00PM Cry-Baby (85m)
5:00PM A Dirty Shame (89m)
7:00PM Crash (100m)
9:15PM Pink Flamingos (93m)
 
Sunday, September 14
1:45PM Before I Forget (108m)
4:00PM Pecker (87m)
6:00PM Pink Flamingos (93m)
8:00PM Cry-Baby (85m)
 
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