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Date: Sunday, 05 Oct 2014 11:03
Jerry  Capeci is a mob expert who formerly covered the Mafia for the New York Daily News. His website, Gang Land News, is a paid subscription site. This article was re-printed with permission.  
 
By Jerry Capeci
Gang Land News

Longtime mob buster Gerard Conrad, who helped put scores of wiseguys behind bars working as a grunt agent on the FBI’s Gambino crime family squad and later as the hands-on supervisor of a revamped squad that now investigates two crime families, retired last week after a quietly illustrious 25 year career as a G-man.

A CPA, Conrad began his FBI career in Chicago and worked organized crime cases there for five years, three under John O’Neil, the counter-terrorism expert who died in the 9-11 attack on the World Trade Center.

Conrad, a New Jersey native, transferred to New York in 1994, working white collar crime cases for four years before joining the Gambino crime family squad in 1998.

Since then, Conrad played important roles in every major case the squad has made, including two racketeering indictments against Peter Gotti and 23 codefendants, three other racketeering cases involving mobsters in New York and Italy, and a huge 62-defendant case that included the Administration of the Gambino crime family in 2008.

Two years later he shared the podium with Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara and New York FBI boss George Venizelos when they announced a racketeering indictment that charged powerful Gambino capo Daniel Marino with the murder of his nephew and 13 codefendants with a litany of other crimes, including sex-trafficking charges involving a minor — a 15-year-old girl.

Conrad, who supervised two major Mafia Takedown Day cases — racketeering against capo Alphonse Trucchio and 20 cohorts and the murder indictment of consigliere Bartolomeo (Bobby Glasses) Vernace for the 1981 Shamrock Bar murders — supervised the FBI squad that currently investigates the Gambino and Luchese crime families for six years.

“Gerry was one of the finest agents I have ever worked with,” said retired FBI agent Philip Scala, whom Conrad succeeded as squad supervisor in 2008.

“The squad will miss him. He’s profoundly humble, with an unlimited willingness to sacrifice for his people and their mission.”

Conrad also knows that it’s always a good idea to keep your eyes open, and pay attention to what’s going on around you, because sometimes when you least expect it, you may come across some evidence that can help put a murderous mobster behind bars for life — even on a walk in the park.

That’s what happened to him at about 3:45 pm on August 15,  a warm and lazy afternoon when he took a break from his FBI duties and spotted three very familiar faces sitting at a  table and chatting behind a cyclone fence in Forest Park, a short stroll from his Kew Gardens office.

“I saw Bobby Vernace, JoJo Corozzo and Alphonse Trucchio,” Conrad recalled last year as one of the final witnesses at Vernace’s racketeering and murder trial in Brooklyn Federal Court. That’s Vernace, in the blue shirt on the left. Corozzo is in the middle. Trucchio on the right.

He wasn’t close enough to hear what they were saying but he knew that putting the three mobsters together just might be relevant at some point, so, he testified, “I immediately called back to the office to get some agents there with a camera” to record the session for posterity.

Conrad kept his eyes peeled on the trio, “from across the park” until agents Robert Herbster and William Johnson got there, and took photos of the trio, still talking to each other at  4:22 pm. Ten minutes later, they took one of Vernace, 65, and Corozzo, 72, who were speaking privately, as Trucchio, 37, stood out of earshot about 20 feet away.

The discussion between the two older mobsters lasted “just a short while,” said Conrad, “two to three minutes.”

The photos weren’t smoking gun evidence. But prosecutors were able to use them, along with Conrad’s detailed account, to tie Bobby Glasses to two powerful Gambino mobsters some 25 years after he had gunned down two bar owners and convince the jury that the killings were related to Gambino family activity and that Vernace was guilty of racketeering and murder.

 

Author: "allan" Tags: "Milestone, News Story, FBI, gerard conra..."
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Date: Friday, 03 Oct 2014 21:20

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story"
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Date: Friday, 03 Oct 2014 13:12
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the recovery of two high-powered weapons and body armor from an FBI agent’s car in North Carolina, WSOCTV.com reports.

The shotgun and rifle were stolen from the agent’s car sometime between midnight and 8 a.m. Monday in the Hunter Oaks neighborhood.

The agent was permitted to keep his weapons in his car because he is part of a special response team that must be ready to respond around-the-clock.

It’s still unclear how the vehicle was broken into.

“No windows were broken,” said John Strong, who is the special agent in charge of the Charlotte Division. “The weapons were in individual canvas bags and locked in the trunk, as required by policy.”

 

Author: "allan" Tags: "FBI, Award, car, Guns, North Carolina, s..."
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Date: Friday, 03 Oct 2014 13:11

Eric Frein

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It’s still anyone’s guess why someone would ambush two Pennsylvania state troopers and then shoot them with a high-caliber rifle on Sept. 12.

One special agent with the FBI offered some insight into the suspect – 31-year-old Eric Matthew Frein.

Frein lived with his parents and likely was unsatisfied with life, said Ed Hanko, special agent in charge of the Philadelphia Division of the FBI. He played in military re-enactments and may have wanted to fulfill one of those roles.

“We want to arrest this person,”  Hanko said, adding later, “We have the who, the what, the where. We want the why.”

After the attack, Frein took cover in the woods and has been missing since.

Author: "allan" Tags: "FBI, investigation, Missing, Pennsylvani..."
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Date: Friday, 03 Oct 2014 13:08

Secret Service photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Whoever takes over the embattled Secret Service will face an insurmountable task.

They must handle plunging morale, a tarnished reputation, budget holes and plenty of blunders that led to the resignation of Director Julia Pierson, the Wall Street Journal reports.

How disgruntled are employees? A 2013 survey found that Secret Service agents had the lowest employee job satisfaction in a decade.

And now there are elected officials who want to change how the Secret Service operates.

“Long term, we must consider restructuring the Secret Service’s mission,” said Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican who has emerged as one of the agency’s most vocal critics in recent days.

From 2010 to 2014, the number of people who protect the president and others fell from 3,800 to 3,533.

Now Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is considering appointing an outsider to operate the Secret Service.

The problems are numerous, said Jon Adler, the president of Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association, a group whose members include Secret Service agents.

“You don’t have the current training, you have an overworked, tired overextended workforce and it’s going to factor into response time,” he said. “If the agency is properly funded, properly staffed and properly trained, those things in conjunction with the right protocols, then the system works,” he added.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, Congress, Morale, President ..."
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Date: Friday, 03 Oct 2014 12:59

tsa.gov

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Cleveland man was on his way to Puerto Rico to spread his mother’s cremated remains in the Caribbean Sea.

But when Shannon Thomas opened his bag, he discovered that his mom’s ashes had spilled all over the suitcase with a TSA inspection notice, the Cleveland Scene reports.

In a lawsuit against the TSA, Thomas said his bag was packed with a “very heavy and steady” urn that was tightly screwed.

He argues the TSA “”negligently, carelessly, and recklessly replaced the lid of the urn, placed a bag inspection notice in Plaintiff’s suitcase and sent the bag on its way. This action caused the urn to open and spilled the remains of Plaintiff’s mother on the inside of Plaintiff’s suitcase and on Plaintiff’s personal effects.”

Thomas said he can’t understand why the agency hasn’t even issued an apology.

“No person speaking on behalf of the United States or TSA has ever issued an apology, explanation, or notification to [Thomas] aside from the bag search notice.”

Other Stories of Interest


Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, airplane, Caribean sea, insp..."
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Date: Thursday, 02 Oct 2014 13:18
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A federal judge has awarded $1.1 million in damages to a former undercover DEA informant who was kidnapped in Colombia and held captive for more than three months, the Legal Times reported.

The Legal Times reports that a U.S. Court of Federal Claims said the informant, identified in court papers as “The Princess,” “demonstrated that [the DEA’s] breach of contract was a substantial factor in causing the Princess’ kidnapping and captivity, and triggering her multiple sclerosis.”

The informant claimed in a suit that the DEA violated its implied-in-fact contract when it failed to prevent her from being kidnapped and held captive for more than three months, the Legal Times reported.

To read more click here.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, Colombia, DEA, Informant"
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Date: Thursday, 02 Oct 2014 12:58
By Rhonda Cook
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

A federal agent was in critical but stable condition Tuesday night and a suspect was dead after a shooting during an undercover law enforcement operation in Athens. A second suspect has been charged in the case.

State and federal officials told reporters an Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agent was in the intensive care unit at an area hospital recovering from his wounds.

They identified the dead man as 20-year-old Javonta Darden. The other suspect, 21-year-old Steven McKinley, was arrested.

To read full story click here.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, ATF, athens, Georgia, shot, ..."
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Date: Thursday, 02 Oct 2014 12:50

Director Julia Pierson

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

I think the American public in general has been blown away by recent news of the lapses in Secret Service security involving the President.

I have to think, had terrorists any clue that it was so easy to breach security and get into the White House, they would have tried something long ago.

Thank goodness that the perception of a secure White House has trumped the reality. How any one could make it so far into the White House is mind boggling. 

Of the many times I passed the White House, I never once thought it would be easy to get in.  It looked so daunting. So secure. Apparently, not so.

 I’ve known a lot of outstanding Secret Service agents over the years, and I have to believe there’s a collective feeling of shame for the agency.  

Should Secret Service Director Julia Pierson have been fired?

Well, under the circumstances there seemed to be no other choice.  

There had to be an expression of outrage that came from the Hill as well as the White House, not to mention the public.

So, yes, the coach had to be fired when the team performed so poorly. In this case, it’s not a game.  

Now, we have to bring some of the top security experts in the world to evaluate the weak points in the presidential security details, both on the road and at the White House. It wouldn’t hurt to bring someone from Israel, a nation obsessed with security.

 We in America need so be obsessed about this issue. 

 

 

Author: "allanlengel" Tags: "Uncategorized, julia pierson, Secret Ser..."
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Date: Thursday, 02 Oct 2014 12:43

By Boston Globe
Editorial Board

For the federal agency tasked with protecting the president, it’s embarrassing enough that a man could scale the White House fence and make it well into the executive mansion before being apprehended. But the Secret Service’s defensive response to the incident, including withholding key information about the breach, is a sign of deeper trouble within the agency. The announcement Wednesday that Secret Service Director Julia Pierson had resigned her post and that the Department of Homeland Security will conduct an investigation of the service shows that problems within the agency are being taken seriously. But the review shouldn’t just result in further layers of security around the White House. What’s needed is a reexamination of an internal culture that permitted serious security breaches and a failure of communication with the members of Congress who are supposed to oversee the agency.

On Sept. 19, Omar Gonzalez, a war veteran who is believed to be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, hopped the fence and ran through the unlocked front door into the first floor of the White House. It wasn’t until Gonzalez was in the East Room, well within the building, that an off-duty Secret Service officer was able to tackle him. But that was not the version of events made available to members of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform before their Sept. 30 hearing with Pierson. According to a press release, Gonzalez was apprehended “after entering the White House North Portico doors.” Neither the White House nor the service clarified that statement. The service also said that Gonzalez was unarmed; in fact, he had a knife. According to Representative Stephen Lynch of Massachusetts, who sits on the panel, the committee was unaware of both of those details before they were reported in The Washington Post.

That incident came on the heels of another security failure, in which an armed private security contractor with three prior assault and battery convictions was allowed to ride in an elevator with President Obama during his Sept. 16 visit to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Allowing someone with a criminal record, let alone someone who is armed, within arm’s reach of the president is a direct breach of Secret Service protocol. But according to the Post, Obama was not briefed on the incident.

To read more click here.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, editorial, julia pierson, Pr..."
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Date: Thursday, 02 Oct 2014 12:42
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Want to spy on someone and have immediate access to their calls, texts and photos?

There’s an app for that – and the FBI has tracked down the maker.

The Daily Mail reports that the FBI shut down a website selling the “spyware” app and arrested a Pakistani national in Los Angeles for selling the technology.

The $59.99 app enabled people to intercept call in real time, while also giving them full access to the phone and its data.

The company says it sold more than 100,000 apps.

Andrew McCabe, assistant director of the Washington Field Office said: ‘This application allegedly equips potential stalkers and criminals with a means to invade an individual’s confidential communications.

‘They do this not by breaking into their homes or offices, but by physically installing spyware on unwitting victims’ phones and illegally tracking an individual’s every move.’

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, app, cell phone, FBI, mobile..."
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Date: Thursday, 02 Oct 2014 12:42
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Awaiting DNA results can be frustrating for law enforcement.

But the FBI hopes to change that by expediting the process using the government’s new biometric identification database, Biometric Update reports.

The FBI is accelerating the collection of DNA profiles for the Next Generation Identification System. Law enforcement officers will be able to take DNA swabs from suspects using a portable machine that is designed to create matches within 90 minutes.

That means officers will be able to run tests while temporarily detaining a suspect.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2013 that police officers have the right to capture and analyze a cheek swab just like they have the right to take fingerprints or photographs.

Author: "allan" Tags: "FBI, DNA, fingerprints, Next Generation ..."
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Date: Wednesday, 01 Oct 2014 23:27

Director Julia Pierson

By MATT HANSEN
Los Angeles Times

 WASHINGTON — Battered by a mounting series of security lapses, the head of the Secret Service resigned Wednesday, a day after enduring fierce criticism from lawmakers for failing to fix what they called systemic problems in the agency.

The agency’s director, Julia A. Pierson, herself brought in as a reformer amid embarrassments including a prostitution scandal in 2012, will be replaced by retired agent Joseph Clancy.

Pierson’s tenure began to unravel when an intruder with a knife scaled a fence and ran into the White House on Sept. 19, followed by days of revelations that undermined the initial Secret Service account of what happened. A torrent of news reports also uncovered the agency’s fumbled response to a 2011 shooting attack on the White House and an elevator ride last month that President Obama shared with a security contractor who was armed, which Secret Service agents were unaware of at the time.

To read the full story click here. 

 

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story"
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Date: Wednesday, 01 Oct 2014 23:14

Allan Lengel

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

I think the American public in general has been blown away by recent news of the lapses in Secret Service security involving the President.

I have to think, had terrorists any clue that it was so easy to breach security and get into the White House, they would have tried something long ago.

Thank goodness that the perception of a secure White House has trumped the reality. How any one could make it so far into the White House is mind boggling. 

Of the many times I passed the White House, I never once thought it would be easy to get in.  It looked so daunting. So secure. Apparently, not so.

 I’ve known a lot of outstanding Secret Service agents over the years, and I have to believe there’s a collective feeling of shame for the agency.  

Should Secret Service Director Julia Pierson have been fired?

Well, under the circumstances there seemed to be no other choice.  

Director Julia Pierson

There had to be an expression of outrage that came from the Hill as well as the White House, not to mention the public.

So, yes, the coach had to be fired when the team performed so poorly. In this case, it’s not a game.  

Now, we have to bring some of the top security experts in the world to evaluate the weak points in the presidential security details, both on the road and at the White House. It wouldn’t hurt to bring someone from Israel, a nation obsessed with security.

 We in America need so be obsessed about this issue. 

 

 

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, Secret Service, terrorists"
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Date: Wednesday, 01 Oct 2014 13:13

By Miami Herald
Editorial Board

Last year, the White House was breached twice.

In the movie Olympus Has Fallen, Gerard Butler faced off against Dylan McDermott and a band of Korean terrorists. In White House Down, Channing Tatum fought to save President Jamie Foxx from a band of mercenaries. In both movies, the bad guys found getting into the executive mansion no easy feat; it required ingenious planning and overwhelming force.

Who knew you could just hop the fence and jog through the front door?

That, we now know, is pretty much what alleged intruder Omar Gonzalez, an Iraq War vet suffering from PTSD, did on Sept. 19. The Secret Service initially claimed its agents stopped Gonzalez just inside the front door on the North Portico. Monday, it was revealed he actually made it deeper into the mansion than we were told, running through the main floor of the building — past a stairwell leading to the first family’s living quarters — before being tackled and subdued in the East Room.

The incident would be appalling enough had it happened in a vacuum. But it is only the latest in a series of lapses. There was the incident in 2009 when would-be reality show stars Michaele and Tareq Salahi essentially walked in off the street and crashed a state dinner. There was the 2012 scandal that revealed Secret Service agents partying with prostitutes during a presidential visit to Colombia.

In 2011, a man parked just south of the president’s house and fired a high-powered rifle, striking the building at least seven times. A report in Sunday’s Washington Post describes a Secret Service response filled with miscues, including a supervisor mistakenly ordering subordinates to stand down because the gunshots were only backfires from a vehicle. It took four days for the Secret Service to even realize the building had been hit. And it was only dumb luck the shooter was identified; he crashed his car seven blocks away.

Not to put too fine a point on this, but Barack Obama is the nation’s first African-American president. Since before he took office, he has been the target of attacks from the extreme right so vociferous, shrill and hate-filled as to seem truly unhinged. He is also the president who killed Osama bin Laden.

For these reasons and more, you’d think the Secret Service would be at a heightened level of alert when it comes to his safety. But these incidents suggest the exact opposite: a sloppy, lackadaisical agency unequal to its primary mission. And if it has this much difficulty defending the White House against publicity seekers and disaffected loners, what confidence can we have in its ability to defend against serious people mounting serious attacks?

To read more click here.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, editorial, President Obama, ..."
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Date: Wednesday, 01 Oct 2014 13:11

Julia Pierson

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Secret Service Director Julia Pierson accepted full responsibility for the recent White House intrusion and pledged to improve security at a House Oversight Committee hearing Tuesday, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Pierson divulged that Omar J. Gonzalez, who was armed with a knife, made it deeper into the White House on Sept. 19 than previously thought.

Pierson said Gonzalez was able to make it so far because the White House had two open front doors that don’t automatically lock and a muted alarm system. Secret Service officers also decided to subdue the intruder instead of shoot him.

“Eight hundred million dollars a year…during your tenure…and that door was unlocked,” said Rep. Darrell Issa (R., Calif.), referring to the Secret Service’s personnel budget.

“The door was unlocked at the time of Mr. Gonzalez’s entry, that’s correct,” Ms. Pierson said, adding that automatic locks have since been installed on the White House front doors.

“The fence failed, officers chased him, didn’t catch him, sniper was in position, no shots were fired, dogs were out there, weren’t released, countersurveillance, I’m understanding, is understaffed…nobody shot anything,” Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R., Utah) said.

“It’s clear that our security plan was not properly executed,” Ms. Pierson said. “This is unacceptable and I take full responsibility. And I will make sure that it does not happen again.”

Elected officials said the meeting fueled concerns that the White House is vulnerable.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, Congress, President Obama, S..."
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Date: Tuesday, 30 Sep 2014 13:13
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Omar J. Gonzalez was armed with a knife when he managed to make it much deeper into the White House mansion than previously disclosed, the New York Times reports.

The 42-year-old made it to the ceremonial East Room after overpowering a Secret Service agent inside the North Portico entrance.

Gonzalez finally stopped after trying to enter the Green Room, said Rep. John Chaffetz, R-Utah.

The New York Times writes that the discovery “will set the stage for an explosive congressional hearing on Tuesday when lawmakers” plan to question Secret Service Director Julia Pierson.

The focus of the hearing is a series of security blunders over the past several years.

One law enforcement official told the New York Times that Secret Service officers failed to follow several protocols that made it possible for Gonzalez to nearly reach the Green Room.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, president, Secret Service, s..."
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Date: Tuesday, 30 Sep 2014 13:12
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A retired FBI agent pleaded guilty to 11 federal charges of fraud, conspiracy and obstruction of justice after prosecutors say he tried to derail an investigation into a $54 million military contract, the Associated Press reports.

Robert Lustyik Jr. was expected to start trail Monday in federal court but decided to please guilty at the last moment.

The 52-year-old, however, declined a plea bargain because he doesn’t want to implicate anyone.

Federal prosecutors say Lustyik was helping a company started by former soldiers. They are accused of using insider information to win a $54 million contract with the U.S. government.

Lustyik agreed to take a cut of the contract in exchange for disrupting the investigation by fabricating interviews.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, conspiracy, FBI, Fraud, inve..."
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Date: Tuesday, 30 Sep 2014 13:10
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Joe Ciccarelli, a retired FBI special agent, is taking over as the Huntington Police Department’s new police chief, Metro News reports.

Ciccarelli got his start in law enforcement with the Huntington Police Department in West Virginia.

“Joe Ciccarelli understands our city, our opportunities and our challenges,” Huntington Mayor Steve Williams said in a release. “He is equipped to move our police department forward immediately. His career path is familiar to me. He began his career here and advanced through the ranks to the highest levels of his given profession, all the while having an eye on coming home.”

Ciccarelli joined the FBI in 1984.

“I hope to translate the experience I’ve gained in various assignments throughout my career into positive results for the police department and the city,” he said. “The brave men and women of the Huntington Police Department deserve the best leadership possible and all my efforts will be directed toward seeing that they get that every day.”

U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin said Huntington made a good choice.

“I have known and worked with Joe Ciccarelli for many years during his time as a special agent with the FBI,” Goodwin said. “He has long been a leader in the law enforcement community in southern West Virginia. Joe has a unique ability to bring agencies together in pursuit of a common goal. Mayor Williams made a great choice.”

Author: "allan" Tags: "FBI, FBI agent, Huntington Police Depart..."
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Date: Tuesday, 30 Sep 2014 13:10
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Homeland Security reached a rare settlement with a newspaper after seizing a reporter’s notes and records from her home while executing a warrant for information on guns allegedly possessed by her husband, the Washington Times reports.

The agency agreed to reimburse some of the legal bills accred by the newspaper and the reporter, Audrey Hudson, whose home was raided in August 2013 and her notes and records on the problems inside the Federal Air Marshal Service seized.

“While the settlement payments cover just a fraction of the legal bills we accrued, the fight was, in the end, about protecting a journalist’s right to keep her sources confidential and to engage in the First Amendment protected activity of reporting without unwarranted government intrusion,” said Larry Beasley, the president and chief executive officer of The Times.

Hudson said she hopes the settlement puts an end to similar seizures.

“The importance of this case was that we just were not going to let it stand, the idea that federal officers at will could confiscate a reporter’s notes without any sort of subpoena or search warrant seeking the notes or even directed at the reporter,” Ms. Hudson said.

Homeland Security also returned documents and other notes to Hudson.

Homeland Security did not return calls from the Washington Times for comment.

Author: "allan" Tags: "News Story, FOIA, free speech, Homeland ..."
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