• Shortcuts : 'n' next unread feed - 'p' previous unread feed • Styles : 1 2

» Publishers, Monetize your RSS feeds with FeedShow:  More infos  (Show/Hide Ads)


Date: Tuesday, 15 Apr 2014 16:24
Summary: The U.S. Geological Survey is celebrating the success of three distinguished researchers who are recipients today of the 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). This award is the highest recognition granted by the United States government to scientists and engineers in the early stages of their research careers

Contact Information:

Catherine Puckett ( Phone: 352-377-2469 );




RESTON, Va. — The U.S. Geological Survey is celebrating the success of three distinguished researchers who are recipients today of the 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). This award is the highest recognition granted by the United States government to scientists and engineers in the early stages of their research careers.

The 2012 PECASE recipients from USGS are ecologist Anna D. Chalfoun for her brilliant contributions toward an understanding of habitat and her tireless efforts in training students in conservation-based science; geophysicist Gavin P. Hayes for his critical contributions toward transforming the understanding of earthquake processes and incorporating these advances into real-time earthquake response activities, and for his educational and outreach efforts; and geophysicist Burke J. Minsley for his fundamental research on advancing airborne electromagnetic survey methodology and its use in studying permafrost, as well as his mentoring of students.

caption below
President Barack Obama talks with the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) recipients in the East Room of the White House, April 14, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza) (Official White House Photo).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"The impressive achievements of these early-stage scientists and engineers are promising indicators of even greater successes ahead," President Obama said in a White House press release announcing the awardees. "We are grateful for their commitment to generating the scientific and technical advancements that will ensure America's global leadership for many years to come."

Each year, ten federal departments and agencies join together to nominate outstanding scientists and engineers whose discoveries and advancements expand the horizons of science and technology, contribute to their agencies' missions, and benefit America’s economy and the health and safety of the nation’s people.

The awards, established by President Clinton in 1996, are coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President. Awardees are selected for their pursuit of innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology and their commitment to community service as demonstrated through scientific leadership, public education, or community outreach.

"The work of these creative and innovative young researchers is not only a huge asset to USGS – we couldn’t be prouder of them – but also to society because their work greatly benefits people and our country’s wild places," said Suzette Kimball, acting director of the USGS.

Meet the Awardees 

Dr. Anna D. Chalfoun

Presidential Citation: "For her brilliant contributions toward an understanding of habitat, the most critical element of species, landscape, and ecosystem management and for her tireless efforts to train students while imparting her enthusiasm for conservation-based science." 

Anna D. Chalfoun, assistant unit leader with the USGS's Wyoming Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit and assistant professor at the University of Wyoming, is known for her work addressing wildlife habitat issues and imparting that knowledge and enthusiasm to train students. Chalfoun integrates multi-scale research approaches, from small patches to the landscape, across taxa within ecosystems to understand the impacts of land change, and across broad scientific disciplinary areas.

"Anna is quickly becoming one of the experts on the ecology of the sage brush steppe and the various wildlife species that depend on this important habitat," said Matthew Kauffman, leader of the USGS Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and associate professor at the University of Wyoming. "She has also geared her research program to provide clear information to managers that seek to reduce the impact to wildlife species caused by human-caused changes to the landscape."

A unique mixture and synthesis of experiments and observational studies have made Chalfoun's contributions to science and conservation beneficial at the local, national and international levels. For example, a recent paper of hers in the prominent Journal of Animal Ecology was one of the most downloaded papers of that year.

Chalfoun's research with her graduate students has received significant local, national and international media attention. Her efforts to train graduate students in conservation-based science have been successful, with many of her students earning best student paper awards. Despite this very active research and he training of students, Chalfoun still finds time to serve and contribute to scientific societies. 

Current research in her laboratory spans the disciplines of ecology, evolution, behavior and conservation biology, including research on climate change, energy development, and the mountain pine beetle epidemic.  Chalfoun has a Ph.D. in Wildlife Biology from the University of Montana, Missoula.

Dr. Gavin P. Hayes

Presidential Citation: "For his critical contributions toward transforming our understanding of earthquake processes and incorporating these advances into the real-time earthquake response activities when major global earthquakes occur plus related education and outreach efforts in the U.S. and abroad."

USGS scientist Gavin P. Hayes is receiving a PECASE in recognition of his contributions to improving our knowledge of earthquake processes and integrating these developments into USGS operations for major earthquakes worldwide. After the massive Sumatra earthquake and resulting Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004, it became clear that the existing geophysical models of major earthquakes at plate boundaries and seismologic analysis tools were inadequate to quickly and accurately define such events and estimate their impacts.

In his short tenure at the USGS, Hayes has developed new methodology to determine the seismologic context of major subduction earthquakes. He has also combined new and existing analysis tools into integrated real-time determinations of earthquake magnitudes, fault slip distributions, and potential for collateral effects such as tsunami and land failure.

Hayes also went a step further by implementing these tools into the real-time earthquake response activities of the USGS National Earthquake Information Center. Hayes developed new models of the earth structure in regions with major earthquakes, effectively combining those models with new methodologies to remotely and rapidly image the earthquake rupture. These advances provide key capabilities to the NEIC in fulfilling their mission of rapid and reliable analyses of global earthquakes, while also providing critical framework results for use by the earthquake science community in advancing the understanding of earthquake physics and earthquake vulnerability.

"Gavin is an outstanding scientist and dedicated public servant," said Jill McCarthy, director of the Geologic Hazards Science Center in Golden, Colo. "He has advanced our understanding of earthquake processes and applied that knowledge into the real-time response activities of the USGS. Gavin's new methodologies and insights enable us to better understand, prepare and respond to large, potentially damaging earthquakes."

Although still in the early stages of his career, Hayes has already had significant impact on very important problems in earthquake science. Hayes is unique in that he is both one of the leading, high-impact young research scientists in the global seismology community, while also developing and implementing critical mission-oriented capabilities for the NEIC and the global earthquake response community.

Hayes has a Ph.D. in Geosciences from the Pennsylvania State University. 

Dr. Burke Minsley

Presidential Citation: "For his fundamental research on advancing airborne electromagnetic survey methodology and its application to describe the extent and dynamic state of permafrost during a time of changing climate and his mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students."

As part of an interdisciplinary team of scientists developing applications of airborne electromagnetic methods for a variety of mission-oriented studies, Burke Minsley's work has significantly placed the USGS as a leader in scientific studies of permafrost terrains.  Minsley uses remotely sensed airborne geophysical data to provide detailed new information about the earth’s subsurface, where few details are available, but which is host to critical geological and environmental variables related to groundwater, mineral resources, infrastructure, and permafrost. 

His work has involved the development of new computational tools for uncertainty quantification that redefine how geophysical information is communicated to geologists, hydrologists, and other stakeholders.  For example, his research has resulted in significant advances in calibration of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys and application of earth imaging algorithms.  These advances have resulted in significant contributions to USGS groundwater studies that use both geophysical and hydrologic modeling. His work exemplifies the team approach to integrated science studies, particularly in the challenging area of mapping permafrost.  In addition to permafrost studies, Minsley’s new processing and inversion algorithms have hydrological applications for investigations at the watershed scale to address emerging water resource management issues.

"Burke has made significant contributions in the challenging realm of geophysical and hydrologic modeling," said Trude Ridley, center director for the USGS Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center in Denver.  "His integrated science approach, particularly in the application of airborne electromagnetic methods, has resulted in a better understanding of the shallow subsurface environment."

One of his 2012 permafrost publications was an Editor's Choice article in Science Magazine, with the editor noting that the research not only provides a baseline for future studies on permafrost, but also reveals "important details about potential connections between surface and groundwaters and the evolution of the permafrost over the past 1,000 years."

Minsley began his studies with a B.S. in Applied Physics at Purdue University, followed by a five-year stint on seismic exploration vessels that solidified his interests in geophysics before completing a Ph.D. in Geophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, PECASE Ecosystems Hazards Earthquake..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Friday, 11 Apr 2014 16:30
Summary: Open-File Report 2014-1058: Hydrogeology of the Old Faithful Area, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and its Relevance to Natural Resources and Infrastructure YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. — A newly published scientific report on the geology and hydrology in the area around Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park includes suggestions on how to avoid harming the unique hydrothermal (hot water) features during maintenance of nearby park roads, utilities, and historic buildings.

Contact Information:

Leslie  Gordon, USGS ( Phone: 650-329-4006 ); Al Nash, NPS ( Phone: 307-344-2015 );




Cover of the publication.
Open-File Report 2014-1058: Hydrogeology of the Old Faithful Area, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and its Relevance to Natural Resources and Infrastructure

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. — A newly published scientific report on the geology and hydrology in the area around Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park includes suggestions on how to avoid harming the unique hydrothermal (hot water) features during maintenance of nearby park roads, utilities, and historic buildings.

Since 1872, park administrators have grappled with the delicate balance of preserving natural features while maximizing the ability of the public to enjoy and explore this natural wonderland. Over the past 50 years, visitation to YNP and Old Faithful has almost doubled, resulting in growing needs for parking, lodging, food service, and other essentials. Park administration must frequently consider the tradeoffs involved with simultaneously providing for public enjoyment of the area, maintaining cultural resources, and minimizing impacts to hydrothermal resources in an ever-changing landscape as hydrothermal features continuously migrate.

A panel of leading experts (The Old Faithful Science Review Panel) was convened by Yellowstone National Park to review and summarize the geological and hydrological understanding that can inform park management of the Upper Geyser Basin area. The report, written by U.S. Geological Survey and park geologists, working with university, and private-sector scientists, includes a discussion of the local rock types, and water chemistry, and the behavior of geysers and other features within the hydrothermal system. The panel of scientists also reviewed the effects of infrastructure (utilities, roads, buildings) on thermal features and vice versa.

"Infrastructure and thermal ground don't easily coexist. Hot ground isn't good for buildings, roads and pipelines; conversely, parking lots and sewer lines disrupt the natural hydrology,” explained USGS Geologist and Science Review Panel Co-Chair Jacob Lowenstern. “The popularity of Yellowstone is only increasing with time, so the park needs to consider means to minimize the human impact on both its cultural and natural resources."

The report identifies knowledge gaps and suggests topics for further research. It includes a variety of techniques that can assist park managers as they evaluate options for future management of the Old Faithful area. It also includes suggestions on how to avoid harm to changing and sometimes migrating thermal features during maintenance of critical infrastructure such as the nearby lodging, including the historic Old Faithful Inn.

Visitors watching an eruption of Old Faithful Geyser from the Old Faithful Inn's balcony Photo by: Jim Peaco, Yellowstone National Park (August 2013).
Visitors watching an eruption of Old Faithful Geyser from the Old Faithful Inn's balcony. Photo by: Jim Peaco, Yellowstone National Park (August 2013). (Multimedia Gallery)

“This report, based on the symposium held last June and the deliberative work of the panel, serves as a starting point for management of the most intensively visited location within Yellowstone National Park,” said Dan Wenk, Yellowstone National Park Superintendent. “There may be no place on earth that presents the challenges where such iconic natural and cultural features are within such a short distance of each other.”

Increased research and monitoring of changing temperatures and natural chemical compositions of the waters of the many geysers in the Old Faithful area will help assess whether the long-term changes in eruptive behavior are related to local human impacts or natural regional meteorological or hydrologic factors. Monitoring groundwater levels, and the changes in frequency and the amount of hot water erupted from the geysers will give scientists a better understanding of the underground dynamics of moving fluids, and the many complex factors that affect the geyser’s behavior. 

Weighing both the costs and usefulness, the report recommends which scientific studies would be of most benefit for immediate and long-term park infrastructure planning and management, and emphasizes the important role of science in informed stewardship of the park. Comprehensive assessment and archiving of existing data, and development of an Old Faithful-specific hydrothermal monitoring plan are suggested as high priorities.

The report also addresses a host of related issues regarding cultural resources, facilities maintenance, traffic control, visitor services, and law enforcement—all of which require thoughtful balancing and prioritization. Faced with considerable uncertainty, and given the high value placed on hydrothermal features in the Old Faithful area, the report encourages the application of the precautionary principle in any decisions. 

To balance the protection of the hydrothermal system with infrastructure needs in the Old Faithful area, the report recommends delineating zones of varying degrees of hydrothermal activity, and managing infrastructure accordingly. “Green” zones where there is no evidence of hydrothermal activity might have no constraints on infrastructure, whereas in “red” zones of active hydrothermal activity, building new structures would be prohibited, and special protocols developed for the maintenance of existing infrastructure.

The full report of the Old Faithful Science Review Panel, “Hydrogeology of the Old Faithful Area, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and its Relevance to Natural Resources and Infrastructure,” U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2014-1058, is available online.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, NR2014_04_11 Yellowstone OldFaithful..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 09 Apr 2014 14:00
Summary: Oyster aquaculture in the Potomac River estuary could result in significant improvements to water quality, according to a new NOAA and U.S. Geological Survey study published in the journal Aquatic Geochemistry.

Contact Information:

Ben  Sherman ( Phone: 301-713-3066 ); Karen Rice ( Phone: 434-243-3429 );




Oyster aquaculture in the Potomac River estuary could result in significant improvements to water quality, according to a new NOAA and U.S. Geological Survey study published in the journal Aquatic Geochemistry.

All of the nitrogen currently polluting the Potomac River estuary could be removed if 40 percent of its river bed were used for shellfish cultivation, according to the joint study. The researchers determined that a combination of aquaculture and restored oyster reefs may provide even larger overall ecosystem benefits. Oysters, who feed by filtering, can clean an enormous volume of water of algae which can cause poor water quality 

The study is based on data modeling and an ecosystem-wide scientific evaluation, which examined how activities in the watershed affected the river estuary’s water quality. The research team evaluated nitrogen flows from the Potomac River headwaters and the nutrient-related water quality conditions of the estuary, called eutrophication.

Eutrophication takes place when a body of water becomes enriched in dissolved nutrients that stimulate the growth of aquatic plants, causing nuisance algal blooms. These blooms often result in the depletion of dissolved oxygen and the loss of seagrasses.

The team sought to assess how shellfish aquaculture – specifically oyster aquaculture -- could be used to remove nutrients directly from the water, complementing traditional land-based measures.

Although the estuary bottom area needed to grow oysters to remove the nutrients exists, it is unlikely that such a management measure would be implemented because of conflicting uses. However, a smaller area could still provide great benefits if aquaculture leases were approved. According to the study, if only 15 to 20 percent of the bottom was cultivated it could remove almost half of the incoming nutrients.

“Our study looked to see just how much impact oyster aquaculture could have in restoring some balance to the system,” said Suzanne Bricker, physical scientist in NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the paper’s lead author. “Eutrophication conditions in the Potomac River estuary are representative of conditions found in the Chesapeake Bay and many other U.S. estuaries. Historically, waters of the Potomac and other Chesapeake region estuaries were filtered by oysters, but as their populations declined so did their filtration capabilities. This resulted in increased concentrations of nutrients and related water quality concerns, such as algal blooms and low dissolved oxygen.

“The most expedient way to reduce eutrophication in the Potomac River estuary would be to continue reducing land-based nutrients complemented by a combination of aquaculture and restored oyster reefs. The resulting combination could provide significant removal of nutrients and eutrophication impacts directly from the water column, and offer innovative solutions to long-term persistent water quality problems.”

This alternative approach to water quality management has the potential to address legacy pollution, provide a marketable seafood product if there are no other contaminant issues that would prevent human consumption, and enhance local economies with additional income to growers through the possible development of a program -- similar to those being considered in other parts of the country -- where growers would be paid for the water cleaning services done by their oysters.

Flowing into the Chesapeake Bay, the Potomac River is the fourth largest river on the Atlantic coast, with more than six million people living in its watershed. The NOAA and USGS research about human influences on water quality found that the effects of high nutrient levels have not changed overall since the early 1990s. There are, however, some signs of improvement, such as decreased nitrogen loads from the watershed, increased dissolved oxygen and decreased algal blooms in the upper estuary, and continued regrowth of seagrasses.

While scientists have seen signs of improvement, they remain concerned with eutrophication. Dissolved oxygen, a key measure of water quality, is something fish and other aquatic species can’t survive without.

Atmospheric deposition—where gases and particles are released into the atmosphere from combustion of fossil fuels and return to the land as contaminants—also plays a role in polluting the estuary.

“Less attention has been paid to monitoring the effects of atmospheric deposition in headwater streams now that acidic emissions have declined because of the Clean Air Act and Amendments going into effect,” said Karen Rice, USGS research hydrologist. “Nevertheless, monitoring of forested, headwater streams that reflect changes in atmospheric inputs should be continued, if not expanded, so that changes in stream-water quality as related to atmospheric deposition can be tracked.”

The researchers believe the results of the study may be useful on a broad basis, as there are other river-dominated estuaries in the Chesapeake region and elsewhere along the U.S. coastline that could support shellfish aquaculture.

USGS provides science for a changing world. Visit USGS.gov, and follow us on Twitter @USGS and our other social media channels. Subscribe to our news releases via e-mail, RSS or Twitter.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join NOAA on Facebook, Twitter and our other social media channels.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, Water ChesapeakeBay waterQuality Pot..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 08 Apr 2014 16:45
Summary: Northern sea otters living off the coast of Washington state were infected with the same H1N1 flu virus that caused the world-wide pandemic in 2009, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study

Human H1N1 Pandemic Virus Infected Washington State Sea Otters

Contact Information:

Gail Moede Rogall, USGS ( Phone: 608-270-2438 ); Marisa Lubeck, USGS ( Phone: 303-526-6694 ); CDC Media Relations ( Phone: 404-639-3286 );




Northern sea otters living off the coast of Washington state were infected with the same H1N1 flu virus that caused the world-wide pandemic in 2009, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. 

During an August 2011 health monitoring project, USGS and CDC scientists found evidence that the Washington sea otters were infected with the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus, although the exact date and source of exposure could not be determined. The findings suggest that human flu can infect sea otters.

“Our study shows that sea otters may be a newly identified animal host of influenza viruses,” said Hon Ip, a USGS scientist and co-author of the study. 

The researchers discovered antibodies for the 2009 H1N1 flu virus in blood samples from 70 percent of the sea otters studied. None of the otters were visibly sick, but the presence of antibodies means that the otters were previously exposed to influenza. Further tests concluded that the antibodies were specific to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 flu virus, and not from exposure to other human or avian H1N1 viruses. 

“We are unsure how these animals became infected,” said Zhunan Li, CDC scientist and lead author on the paper. “This population of sea otters lives in a relatively remote environment and rarely comes into contact with humans.” 

An unrelated 2010 study showed that northern elephant seals sampled off the central California coast had also been infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. This elephant seal exposure is the only other known pandemic H1N1 influenza infection in marine mammals, and similar to sea otters, it is unclear how the seals were exposed.

“Our new study identifies sea otters as another marine mammal species that is susceptible to influenza viruses and highlights the complex interspecies transmission of flu viruses in the marine environment,” said USGS scientist LeAnn White.

The 2009 H1N1 virus has spread globally among people since 2009 and was the predominant flu virus in circulation during the 2013-2014 flu season. This study is the first time that evidence of influenza infection has been detected in sea otters, although these viruses have previously been found in many different animals, including ducks, chickens, pigs, whales, horses and the elephant seals.

The study is published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases and is available online.

Sea otter sampling was performed by a collaboration of the USGS National Wildlife Health Center, USGS Alaska Science Center, USGS Western Ecological Research Center, Monterey Bay Aquarium and Seattle Aquarium. 

The USGS and the Interior Department work with CDC and other state and federal partners on research related to zoonotic diseases – diseases that can be passed between animals and humans – to help provide an early warning to the agriculture, public health and wildlife communities, as well as to the public. For more information, please visit the USGS National Wildlife Health Center or CDC websites.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, Ecosystems WildlifeHealth WildlifeDi..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 08 Apr 2014 13:00
Summary: The Water Environment Federation (WEF) and the Northeast Midwest Institute invite you to a briefing by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) on findings of trends in nutrients and pesticides in the Nation's streams and rivers

Contact Information:

Ethan Alpern ( Phone: 703-648-4406 );




The Water Environment Federation (WEF) and the Northeast Midwest Institute invite you to a briefing by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) on findings of trends in nutrients and pesticides in the Nation's streams and rivers. The briefing will primarily focus on the Mississippi River Basin, which covers about 40% of the nation and represents a wide range of important climatic, agricultural, and urban influences that are present throughout the country.

As Congress debates federal activities and funding for water-quality protection and restoration efforts, it is critical to know how conditions are actually changing over time and to understand why changes have occurred. From NAWQA monitoring, we now know that nitrate loadings from the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico increased 14 percent from 1980 to 2010 despite extensive efforts to improve and expand the use of urban and agricultural management practices during the period. Have governmental actions been effective or are other influences causing the changes?

The briefing will also include findings from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) efforts to assess the health of the Nation’s estuaries and will explain how information and findings from NAWQA’s monitoring and assessments contribute to their assessments and the protection of our estuaries.

Who: Alan Vicory, Principal – Stantec Consulting & Chair – WEF Government Affairs Committee, Moderator
Lori Sprague, Coordinator – NAWQA Surface-Water Trends, U.S. Geological Survey
Suzanne Bricker, NOAA National Center for Coastal Ocean Science

When: Friday, April 11, 2014
10:00AM – 11:30AM

Where:   Congressional Room South, CVC 217
Washington, D.C.
 

Following presentations by the two speakers, there will be time for questions and discussion from the audience. This briefing is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to cbarbour@usgs.gov. If you did not respond, you must show a picture ID. For more information, contact Ethan Alpern.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, Water WaterHydrologicNetworksandAnal..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 08 Apr 2014 13:00
Summary: The Water Environment Federation (WEF) and the Northeast Midwest Institute invite you to a briefing by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) on findings of trends in nutrients and pesticides in the Nation's streams and rivers

Contact Information:

Ethan Alpern ( Phone: 703-648-4406 );




The Water Environment Federation (WEF) and the Northeast Midwest Institute invite you to a briefing by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) on findings of trends in nutrients and pesticides in the Nation's streams and rivers. The briefing will primarily focus on the Mississippi River Basin, which covers about 40% of the nation and represents a wide range of important climatic, agricultural, and urban influences that are present throughout the country.

As Congress debates federal activities and funding for water-quality protection and restoration efforts, it is critical to know how conditions are actually changing over time and to understand why changes have occurred. From NAWQA monitoring, we now know that nitrate loadings from the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico increased 14 percent from 1980 to 2010 despite extensive efforts to improve and expand the use of urban and agricultural management practices during the period. Have governmental actions been effective or are other influences causing the changes?

The briefing will also include findings from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) efforts to assess the health of the Nation’s estuaries and will explain how information and findings from NAWQA’s monitoring and assessments contribute to their assessments and the protection of our estuaries.

Who: Alan Vicory, Principal – Stantec Consulting & Chair – WEF Government Affairs Committee, Moderator
Lori Sprague, Coordinator – NAWQA Surface-Water Trends, U.S. Geological Survey
Suzanne Bricker, NOAA National Center for Coastal Ocean Science

Where: Friday, April 11, 2014
10:00AM – 11:30AM

When: Congressional Room South, CVC 217
Washington, D.C.
 

Following presentations by the two speakers, there will be time for questions and discussion from the audience. This briefing is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to cbarbour@usgs.gov. If you did not respond, you must show a picture ID. For more information, contact Ethan Alpern.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, Water WaterHydrologicNetworksandAnal..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 07 Apr 2014 15:00
Summary: Dramatic distribution losses and a few major distribution gains are forecasted for southwestern bird and reptile species as the climate changes, according to just-published research by scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of New Mexico, and Northern Arizona University.

Southwestern Bird and Reptile Distributions to Shift as Climate Changes

Contact Information:

Catherine Puckett ( Phone: 352-377-2469 );




Dramatic distribution losses and a few major distribution gains are forecasted for southwestern bird and reptile species as the climate changes, according to just-published research by scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of New Mexico, and Northern Arizona University.

Overall, the study forecasted species distribution losses – that is, where species are able to live – of nearly half for all but one of the 5 reptile species they examined, including for the iconic chuckwalla. The threatened Sonoran (Morafka’s) desert tortoise, however, is projected to experience little to no habitat losses from climate change. 

Breeding bird ranges exhibited greater expansions and contractions than did reptile species. For example, black-throated sparrows and gray vireos are projected to experience major gains in breeding habitat, but pygmy nuthatches, sage thrashers and Williamson sapsuckers are forecasted to experience large losses in breeding habitat, in some cases by as much as 80 percent. Thus, these three species might be expected to experience large future population declines.

The iconic pinyon jay is expected to experience from one-fourth to one-third loss in breeding habitat in the future, as its welfare is tied to declining pinyon pine habitat.

“Not surprisingly, whether a species is projected to be a winner or a loser depends primarily on its natural history and habitat needs and requirements,” said USGS scientist Charles van Riper III, the lead author on the study. “Land managers should be aware of these potential changes so that they can adjust their management practices accordingly.”

To conduct the study, scientists coupled existing global climate change models with newly developed species distribution models to estimate future losses and gains of 7 southwestern upland bird species and 5 reptile species. The study area focused on the Sonoran Desert and Colorado Plateau ecosystems within Arizona, western New Mexico, Utah, southwestern Colorado and southeastern California, but also included the rest of the Western United States. Focal wildlife species included resident and migratory birds and reptiles, which make up most of the vertebrate biodiversity in the region. 

Temperatures in this region are projected to increase 6.3-7.2 F (3.5–4°C) within the next 60–90 years while precipitation is projected to decline by 5–20 percent.

“Changes of this magnitude may have profound effects on distribution and viability of many species,” noted Stephen T. Jackson, director of the Interior Department’s Southwest Climate Science Center. “Temperature matters a lot, biologically, in arid and semi-arid regions."

One very practical result of the project is a website with a series of range maps projecting the potential effects of climate change on bird and reptile distributions in the Western United States for three different time periods in the next 90 years. These predictions can help managers and policy makers better prioritize conservation effects, van Riper said.

“Wildlife resource managers need regionally specific information about climate change consequences so they better identify tools and strategies to conserve and sustain habitats in their region,” said Doug Beard, director of the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center that supported the project.  “Managers can use these results to help plan for ways to offset projected effects of climate change on these species.”

Detailed Bird Species Projections:

Overall: Black-throated sparrow and gray vireo are projected to experience major gains in breeding habitat.  In contrast, pygmy nuthatches, sage thrashers and Williamson sapsuckers are projected to experience large losses in breeding habitat.  Thus, these three species might be expected to experience large future population declines. (Note: species are linked to their in-depth report summaries.)

  • Black-throated sparrow: breeding range projected to increase by 34-47 percent between 2010 and 2099.
  • Gray vireo: breeding range projected to increase from 58-71 percent between 2010 and 2099.
  • Virginia’s warbler: breeding range projected to decrease slightly, by 1.5-7 percent between 2010 and 2099.
  • Sage thrasher: breeding range projected to decrease by 78 percent between 2010 and 2099.
  • Pinyon jay: breeding range projected to decrease by 25-31 percent between 2010 and 2099.
  • Pygmy nuthatch: breeding range projected to decrease by 75-81 percent between 2010 and 2099.
  • Williamson’s sapsucker: breeding range projected to decrease by 73-78 percent between 2010-2099.

Reptiles

Overall: Future climate change will negatively affect the distributions of reptiles in the Western and Southwestern U.S. The one exception is the Sonoran desert tortoise, which is forecasted to expand, and, if a decrease happens, only by about one percent.

Reptiles can’t move as easily as birds nor can they regulate their body temperature, so they can only move minimally in response to changing climates.  The authors found that the greater the projected distributional gain or loss in a reptile species was directly tied to the warmth of its current range.  Thus, the less mobile reptiles will be more greatly affected by increasing temperatures.

  • Plateau striped whiptail: range projected to decrease by 42 percent, assuming no dispersal, or by 17 percent, with unlimited dispersal, between 2010 and 2099.
  • Arizona black rattlesnake:  range projected to decrease between 32 and 46 percent between 2010 and 2099.
  • Sonoran desert tortoise: The Sonoran (Morafka’s) desert tortoise is the only species of reptile for which projections do not include a decrease in suitable habitat by 2099 but only when unlimited dispersal is assumed.  When assuming no dispersal, a slight one percent decrease is forecasted in the extent of suitable habitat.
  • Common lesser earless lizard: ranged projected to decrease by 22-49 percent from 2010 to 2099.
  • Common chuckwalla: projected ranges are likely to decrease by between 13 and 23 percent between 2010 and 2099.  

The report, Projecting climate effects on birds and reptiles of the southwestern United States, is authored by Charles van Riper III, USGS; James Hatten, USGS; J. Tom Giermakowski, University of New Mexico; Jennifer A. Holmes and Matthew J. Johnson, Northern Arizona University; and others.

For more information about the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center, please visit its website.

 

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, ClimateChange ClimateandLandUseChang..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 07 Apr 2014 12:48
Summary: Just released, the latest edition of the nation’s most comprehensive look at land-surface conditions from coast to coast shows the extent of land cover types from forests to urban areas

Detailed Reference Based on Landsat Images

Contact Information:

Jon Campbell ( Phone: 571-230-6831 ); Collin Homer ( Phone: 605-594-2714 ); Tom Holm ( Phone: 605-594-6127 );




 caption available below image

A Triptych of Urban Growth, NLCD 2001-2011

These three panels of cyclical data (2001, 2006, 2011) from the National Land Cover Database depict intervals of land cover change in the vicinity of Spring Valley, a suburb of Las Vegas, NV. NLCD 2011 (right panel) shows the expanding intensity of the developed impervious surface area (shades of red) during the 10-year period. Las Vegas continues to be one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the nation. (High resolution image 3.4 MB)

Just released, the latest edition of the nation’s most comprehensive look at land-surface conditions from coast to coast shows the extent of land cover types from forests to urban areas. The National Land Cover Database (NLCD 2011) is made available to the public by the U.S. Geological Survey and partners.                    

Dividing the lower 48 states into 9 billion geographic cells, the massive database provides consistent information about land conditions at regional to nationwide scales. Collected in repeated five-year cycles, NLCD data is used by resource managers and decision-makers to conduct ecosystem studies, determine spatial patterns of biodiversity, trace indications of climate change, and develop best practices in land management. 

 “America’s land and waters face unprecedented challenges from natural disasters, climate change, development pressures, and population growth,” said Anne Castle, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Water and Science. “Prudently using our public lands and developing our energy potential, while protecting our natural resources at the same time, requires a keen appreciation of how the landscape is changing over time and the causes of those changes. The digital view that the National Land Cover Dataset affords us is sweeping, yet amazingly precise. It is one of the most important tools, for the Department of the Interior or any other land or water manager, in fostering an impartial perspective of landscape dynamics.”

 Based on Landsat satellite imagery taken in 2011, NLCD 2011 describes the land cover of each 30-meter cell of land in the conterminous United States and identifies which ones have changed since the year 2006. Nearly six such cells — each 98 feet long and wide — would fit on a football field. Land cover is broadly defined as the biophysical pattern of natural vegetation, agriculture, and urban areas. It is shaped by both natural processes and human influences.

NLCD 2011 updates the previous database version, NLCD 2006. The NLCD program is designed to provide five-year cyclical updating of our nation's land cover, similar to the cyclical population updating done by the U.S. Census. 

NLCD is constructed by the 10-member federal interagency Multi‑Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium (MRLC)

“The ongoing 20-year collaboration of the consortium is a model of cooperation among government entities,” said Matt Larsen, USGS associate director for climate and land use change. “Combining resources from MRLC member agencies to provide digital land cover for the Nation is the best kind of teamwork. It not only advances land change science, but it saves taxpayer money.”

The range and the spatial accuracy of NLCD have made it essential to thousands of expert users. The carefully calibrated data enables managers of public and private lands, urban planners, agricultural experts, and scientists with many different interests (for instance, climate, invasive species or hydrogeography) to identify critical characteristics of the land and patterns of land cover change, informing a variety of investigations from monitoring forests to modeling water runoff in urban areas. 

NLCD 2011 products depict 16 classes of land cover in the lower 48 states, define the degree of surface imperviousness in urban areas (impervious surface extent — concrete, asphalt, etc. — serves as a marker for urban environmental quality), and quantify the amount of tree canopy cover (essential for applications dealing with wildfire, carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat, and biodiversity). 

Additionally, NLCD editions from 2001 to 2011 have been integrated to provide a 10-year land cover change comparison for our nation at five year intervals. Having a decade of change information readily available for any location enables users to better understand the trajectory of land cover change patterns and provides specialists with critical information to advance the understanding of land cover change processes.

NLCD 2011 products will be also released for Alaska later this year. For more information on NLCD and to download NLCD data free of charge, visit the MLRC website

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, ClimateandLandUseChangeLandRemoteSen..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 07 Apr 2014 11:00
Summary: A new DNA protocol developed by the U.S. Geological Survey helps biologists distinguish between native and invasive species of aquatic vegetation that have almost identical appearances

Contact Information:

Jon Campbell ( Phone: 571-230-6831 ); Nancy Rybicki ( Phone: 703-648-5728 );




A new DNA protocol developed by the U.S. Geological Survey helps biologists distinguish between native and invasive species of aquatic vegetation that have almost identical appearances.  Until now, measuring the dispersal of these various invasive plants has been hampered by confusion about where and when the plants arrived. 

Invasive aquatic plants from Korea, Brazil, and the Indian subcontinent have been spreading through U.S. waterways for decades. The new DNA protocol will help biologists identify species, track their progress, and provide facts to local managers who can develop appropriate control measures.

“When invasive plants appear in a body of water, local people naturally are alarmed” said Nancy Rybicki, the USGS biologist who teamed up with molecular biologists to develop the new DNA testing technique. “Enormous amounts of money are spent on control. Some species may look very nearly identical, but they have unique reproductive and growth characteristics. Identification, the first step for control or eradication, needs to be precise.” 

Co-author and previous USGS employee, Mary Voytek has had extensive experience with the use of molecular tools for microbial identification. In the case of microbes, there are established standards for identification using portions of an organism’s DNA. Not so with plants. It was difficult to know where to start.

The authors were able to develop a simple protocol that was verified on voucher specimens and tested on numerous plant samples. The environmental implications of the results were clear as new information on the range and recent history of these invasive species was revealed.

Using this new protocol, Rybicki determined that hydrilla arrived in both the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay earlier than previously thought, a finding that revises earlier ideas of how it was first introduced into the area. 

The authors found that hydrilla was in the Potomac River in 1976. Thus, the original introduction of hydrilla to the Potomac was not from National Park Service experiments conducted in 1980 at Dyke Marsh on the tidal Potomac River as previously thought.  It is probable that hydrilla was already present, but was misidentified. It may still be undiscovered in many locations today.  

The two biotypes of hydrilla, one first introduced into Florida and the other first introduced into Washington, DC, are both spreading toward Canada, well beyond their predicted range.

 “We anticipate that hydrilla will continue to move into colder regions, including, the Great Lakes, where a native plant called elodea is common,” Rybicki explained. “Without DNA verification, misidentification of the two plants is likely.” 

DNA analysis to identify underwater grasses, a service provided at the USGS lab in Reston, VA, enables quick identification of these species.  Future use of DNA analysis will likely reveal that many more misidentifications have occurred and are waiting to be discovered.  Positive identification is the key first step in any discussion of management options to deal with invasive species. 

Learn more

Rybicki, N. B., Kirshtein, J. D., and Voytek, M. A., 2013, Molecular techniques to distinguish morphologically similar Hydrilla verticillata, Egeria densa, Elodea nuttallii, and Elodea canadensis, Journal of Aquatic Plant Management, v. 51, p. 94 -102.

Corresponding author, nrybicki@usgs.gov

Ecological Research on Wetlands and Submersed Aquatic Vegetation

National Research Program  

USGS Ecosystems

USGS Water Resources

 

 

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "TA, Water WaterHydrologicResearchandDeve..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 03 Apr 2014 16:30
Summary: CARSON CITY, Nev. — Newly published research is the first to characterize the distribution and interactions of natural perchlorate in a terrestrial ecosystem. The study results are important in assessing risks associated with ecological and human health and with potential movement of natural perchlorate contamination into groundwater.

Contact Information:

Leslie  Gordon ( Phone: 650-329-4006 );




CARSON CITY, Nev. — Newly published research is the first to characterize the distribution and interactions of natural perchlorate in a terrestrial ecosystem. The study results are important in assessing risks associated with ecological and human health and with potential movement of natural perchlorate contamination into groundwater.

The U.S. Geological Survey and Texas Tech University study quantified natural levels of perchlorate in desert soil, plants, and atmospheric materials, and identified what controls its natural cycling and accumulation. Perchlorate, a chemical found in rocket fuel and fertilizers, is a compound that also occurs naturally. These new findings quantify natural perchlorate background levels and improve understanding of soil-plant-atmosphere processes that will, in turn, aid the identification, interpretation, and treatment of sites contaminated by human uses of perchlorate.

Perchlorate (a molecule with four atoms of oxygen for every chlorine atom: ClO4) has emerged as an environmental contaminant in drinking water and food. Medical research has shown that its ingestion can disrupt human thyroid function, and the greatest risk may be to fetuses and infants because of the role of thyroid hormones in early growth and brain development. Perchlorate contamination near former military and industrial sites has been well documented, but natural background levels are poorly understood.

Scientists collected and analyzed soil, leaves from shrubs, and rain, dust, and other materials from the atmosphere at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site in Nevada. Shallow soils in the research area contained a high level of perchlorate – 10-20 grams per hectare (about one to three tenths of an ounce per acre) in the top 30 cm (one foot). That amount of highly soluble perchlorate, if flushed to groundwater, would be sufficient to roughly contaminate a quarter million gallons of water per acre at California’s maximum contaminant level. Although there is no federal drinking water standard for perchlorate, California’s maximum contaminant level for perchlorate in drinking water is 6 micrograms per liter (or one ounce of perchlorate per 125 million gallons of water).

Two previously-unrecognized sources and sinks of perchlorate in desert ecosystems were identified. The study showed that vegetation plays a key role in regulating the accumulation, retention, and release of perchlorate across the land surface, and that atmospheric deposition rates for perchlorate are about ten times larger than previously reported.

Leaves of desert plants represent a large above-ground reservoir from which perchlorate may be released when plant and climatic conditions are right for leaf drop. The leaves of desert vegetation selectively accumulate perchlorate such that the leaves of the dominant vegetation (creosote bush) contained about four times the annual average atmospheric deposition, or about one to two grams of perchlorate per hectare (about one to three hundredths of an ounce per acre). Creosote bush normally keeps its leaves year round, but drops them (along with their accumulated perchlorate load) during extended periods of drought.

Atmospheric deposition occurs both from rain, washing compounds out of the atmosphere, and the settling out of dry airborne materials, including dust. Previous atmospheric deposition rates for perchlorate were reported for wet atmospheric deposition only. Dry deposition is normally excluded from atmospheric deposition network collectors, but this study showed that dry deposition is an important contributor of perchlorate to the land surface.

Partial funding for this research was provided by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Defense.

The research paper, “Soil, Plant, and Terrain Effects on Natural Perchlorate Distribution in a Desert Landscape,” by Brian Andraski, Andrew Jackson, and others was published last week in the “Journal of Environmental Quality.”

 

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, NR2014_04_03 perchlorate desert ecos..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 02 Apr 2014 15:00
Summary: A new report by the U.S. Geological Survey describes the extent and movement of contamination in the East Poplar oil field area in northeastern Montana

Contact Information:

Joanna Thamke ( Phone: (406) 457-5923 ); Bruce Smith ( Phone: (303) 236-1399 );




HELENA, Mont. – A new report by the U.S. Geological Survey describes the extent and movement of contamination in the East Poplar oil field area in northeastern Montana. The contamination in shallow groundwater and the Poplar River is brine, which is saltier than seawater and is a byproduct as part of the process of extracting crude oil in the East Poplar oil field. The study determined likely source areas, brine plume extents, and movement of the plumes.

For more than half a century, millions of gallons of brine have been produced along with oil from the East Poplar oil field on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Until recently, the waste brine was placed in pits and ponds or injected into the ground through deep disposal wells and has made its way to the shallow groundwater and the Poplar River.  Currently, the only approved method of brine disposal is to inject it deep into the ground.

When the brine mixes with the groundwater in the area, it often makes the water unsuitable for domestic purposes. Groundwater was previously the only available source of potable water to the area, and provided water for household wells and the city of Poplar’s public water-supply wells. Currently, treated water from the Missouri River about 20 miles upstream of the city of Poplar is piped to the city and nearby residents.

"There are many brine sources in the study area, resulting in multiple plumes.  Some plumes remain in the groundwater for decades and have merged together, making it difficult to identify original sources," said Joanna Thamke, USGS hydrologist and lead author of the report. She continued, "this is important in development of water management practices, such as optimally locating wells in the future."

The USGS study, conducted in cooperation with the Fort Peck Tribe's' Office of Environmental Protection, shows that the brine contaminated groundwater is generally moving towards the southwest, eventually discharging into the Missouri River.

"This information will be used by the Fort Peck Tribes to direct future natural resource conservation efforts," said Deb Madison, Fort Peck Tribes' Environmental Programs Manager, who also added "the Fort Peck Tribes care deeply about these natural resources for today and for future generations."

Copies of "Delineation of Brine Contamination in and near the East Poplar Oil Field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Northeastern Montana, 2004–09" are available online.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, ground-water contaminants PoplarRive..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 01 Apr 2014 13:00
Summary: This April marks the one year anniversary of the USGS's The National Map Corps (TNMCorps) transition from a small regional pilot project in the heart of Denver, Colo., into a very successful nation-wide project

The National Map Corps celebrates one year of crowd-sourcing successes in collaborative mapping.

Contact Information:

Mark Newell, APR ( Phone: 573-308-3850 ); Pat  Phillips ( Phone: 703-648-5931 ); Elizabeth McCartney ( Phone: 573-308-3696 );




 Order of the Surveyor’s Chain, the first of several TNMCorps recognition awards, is conferred to volunteers who collect at least 25 points.
Order of the Surveyor’s Chain, the first of several TNMCorps recognition awards, is conferred to volunteers who collect at least 25 points. (High resolution image)
 Gammarus mucronatus, an amphipod grazer that can promote healthy eelgrass beds. Copyrighted photo courtesy of Matthew Whalen/UC Davis.
Theodolite Assemblage badge, currently the highest TNMCorps recognition award, is earned by collecting more than 2,000 points. (High resolution image)

This April marks the one year anniversary of the USGS's The National Map Corps (TNMCorps) transition from a small regional pilot project in the heart of Denver, Colo., into a very successful nation-wide project.  During the past year, civilian volunteers in every state have increasingly provided accurate mapping data to the National Geospatial Program's publically available application called The National Map

Using crowd-sourcing techniques, TNMCorps' Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) project engages citizen scientists to collect manmade structures data including: schools, hospitals, post offices, police stations and other important public buildings. 

By The Numbers:

Over the past year TNMCorps has achieved the following significant milestones:

  • 1,422 – volunteers
  • 42,009 - contributions (counts each person’s edit per single point)
  • 33,698 - unique points edited (individual structures)
  • 50,696 - total number of edits (the sum of all edits made by volunteers)
  • 50  - number of states involved
  • 18 - number of volunteers who have earned more than 500 points
  • 4,691 -  state with largest number of edited points; Colorado 

"This project has proven that we can count on volunteers to provide quality information to be included in authoritative government databases", said Kari Craun, Director of the National Geospatial Technical Operations Center. "The people that have contributed their time are performing a community service by ensuring key structures data are available publically." 

Becoming a volunteer for TNMCorps is easy; go to The National Map Corps project site to learn more and to sign up as a volunteer. If you have access to the Internet and are willing to dedicate some time editing map data, please consider participating. Participants can earn badges and public recognition by submitting a series of points. 

While some familiarity with the area that a volunteer chooses is helpful, you do not have to live near a particular place to contribute. The tools on TNMCorps website, along with ancillary information available on the Internet, are generally sufficient to edit a distant area. 

See for yourself how much fun participating can be. Go to The National Map Corps home page and give it a try. 

Status map showing the location and density of volunteer submitted structure edits.
Status map showing the location and density of volunteer submitted structure edits. (High resolution image)
Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, CoreScienceSystemsNationalGeospatial..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 31 Mar 2014 13:00
Summary: To initiate new research projects on mineral resources important to the nation's economy, security, and land-use decisions, the U.S. Geological Survey has awarded $208,000 in research grants. 

Contact Information:

Diane Noserale ( Phone: 703-648-4333 ); Jeff Doebrich ( Phone: 703-648-6103 );




To initiate new research projects on mineral resources important to the nation's economy, security, and land-use decisions, the U.S. Geological Survey has awarded $208,000 in research grants. 

Recipients of the 2014 USGS Mineral Resources External Research Program grants will study rare earth elements in Colorado; scarce metals in the U.S. and global economies; and nickel, copper and platinum deposits in the Lake Superior region. These and other USGS mineral research projects are intended to provide science that can help the nation to avoid supply disruptions for minerals that are critical for national security and the economy, while reducing the effects of mining and other activities on the environment.  

A Rare Concentration of Rare Earth Elements Near Jamestown, Colorado

Julien Allaz of the University of Colorado, Boulder will investigate an unusual concentration of rare earth elements in veins near Jamestown, Colorado. These veins were first studied more than 70 years ago, but not since.  Allaz will investigate the origin of these veins using state-of-the-art methods.  Rare earth elements are essential for an expanding array of high-technology applications, for many alternative energy technologies and for a number of key defense systems, but they are rarely concentrated into mineable ore deposits. Understanding the origin of these veins will help us to assess where similar concentrations of rare earth elements occur.

Understanding the Life Cycle of Scarce Metals in the U.S. and Global Economies

Thomas Graedel of Yale University will lead a team of researchers to characterize the materials flow of four scarce metals: gallium, germanium, rhenium, and tungsten. While similar studies have been conducted for major metals such as iron and copper, no such study has been done for these scarce metals, which are used to make aircraft engines, medical equipment, fiber optics, solar technology, consumer electronics, and lighting.  This study will help to quantify potential supply strengths and weaknesses, to manage metal use more wisely, and to protect the environment. 

How Did Copper Deposits Form in Sedimentary Rocks in Northern Wisconsin and Michigan

John Ridley of Colorado State University will investigate the nature and extent of fluids that transported and deposited copper in the Nonesuch Formation of northern Wisconsin and Michigan. Though two deposits, Copperwood and White Pine, occur in the Nonesuch, the fluid flow associated with these types of copper deposits is typically much more extensive than the deposits themselves. Copper has long been the key to improved living conditions. Today, nearly every building and house in the U.S. contains copper. It is used in plumbing, electrical wiring, cars, cell phones, and in wind turbines. This research will help evaluate the potential for similar copper deposits in the nation’s mid-continent region.

Determining the Source of Nickel, Copper and Platinum in Deposits of the Lake Superior Region

Edward Ripley and Chusi Li of Indiana University will research the source of nickel, copper and platinum group metals in the Lake Superior region of Minnesota and Michigan. They will apply state-of-the-art copper isotope analysis to determine if the metals originated from igneous rock intrusions in which they are now concentrated or from sedimentary rocks that surround the intrusions.  Platinum group metals are used to reduce motor vehicle emissions and in technology. Nickel is used to produce strong alloys and stainless steel.  This research project will help to assess and explore for deposits in similar geologic environments in the mid-continent region and elsewhere.

The MRERP invited research proposals that addressed the following topics:

  • The Mid-continent Rift of the U.S.—Multidisciplinary studies to image and characterize the mineral resource potential of this significant crustal feature.
  • Alaska as a mineral resource frontier—Core science investigations as a foundation for documenting mineral resource potential
  • Hyperspectral imaging or other geophysical investigations of selected regions of the U.S.—State-of-the-art tools for mineral resource and mineral environmental investigations
  • Materials flow studies—Investigations to address supply chain analysis (including risk analysis) and sustainable mineral supplies
  • Critical Mineral Resources—Research to better understand the genesis and regional controls on the distribution of critical mineral-bearing systems. For the purpose of this solicitation, critical mineral commodities are defined as follows (in alphabetical order): cobalt, gallium, indium, lithium, niobium, platinum group elements, rare earth elements, rhenium, tantalum, and tellurium.

USGS accepted proposals from academia, State agencies, industry, or other private sector organizations and scientists. Visit the USGS Mineral Resources External Research Program for more information.

The USGS Mineral Resources Program delivers unbiased science and information to understand mineral resource potential, production, consumption, and how minerals interact with the environment.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "TA, 2014MineralResearchGrants MineralRes..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 27 Mar 2014 18:28
Summary: Sitkinak Island, Alaska — Ever since the great magnitude 9.2 earthquake shook Alaska 50 years ago today, scientists have suspected that the quake's rupture halted at the southwestern tip of Kodiak Island due to a natural barrier. However, recent research suggests some large quakes can punch through these obstacles, and have done so in the past, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. 

Contact Information:

Heidi  Koontz ( Phone: 303-202-4763 ); Nanci Bompey, AGU ( Phone: 202-777-7524 );




Sitkinak Island, Alaska — Ever since the great magnitude 9.2 earthquake shook Alaska 50 years ago today, scientists have suspected that the quake's rupture halted at the southwestern tip of Kodiak Island due to a natural barrier. However, recent research suggests some large quakes can punch through these obstacles, and have done so in the past, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. 

U.S. Geological Survey scientists and researchers from partner institutions working on Sitkinak Island, 15 miles southwest of Kodiak Island, unearthed geologic records from the last 1,000 years of at least three large subduction ruptures – sudden dislocations in which one crustal plate lurches beneath another – that broke through the western edge of the 1964 Alaska earthquake. Among the new findings is the first geologic evidence of the great 1788 Alaska earthquake and tsunami, a seismic event previously known only from historical writings from Russian settlements in the region at the time. 

During the 1964 Alaska earthquake, a sudden slip on the subduction megathrust extended from near Kayak Island in the east to the southwestern tip of Kodiak Island in the west, resulting in widespread ground shaking and a damaging tsunami. 

To gather information on great earthquakes prior to 1964, the research team uncovered stratigraphic evidence of land-level change and tsunami inundation along the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust on Sitkinak Island. Hand-driven cores and tidal outcrops in a lagoon reveal five sharp changes in lithology and microfossils that record sudden upward and downward jerks during large earthquakes. Two of the changes correspond to the 1964 rupture and an earlier analog, while three sharp horizons mark ruptures that passed beneath Sitkinak Island, including the 1788 rupture.

"It's been proposed that the edge of the 1964 rupture acts as a long-lived and stable barrier limiting the size of great earthquakes," said Rich Briggs, lead author of the study and a USGS Research Geologist. "However, the geologic record suggests this isn't the case, and that some, if not most large ruptures break through. Future studies will aim to determine the sizes of these boundary-busting ruptures. Understanding this problem is important because hazard models depend on an accurate understanding of the locations and sizes of prehistoric earthquakes," Briggs added.

"The Sitkinak results demonstrate the crucial role that microfossils such as diatoms and foraminifera play in improving our understanding of great earthquake ruptures," said Simon Engelhart, a University of Rhode Island researcher and study coauthor. "They were the smoking gun that indicated both coseismic uplift and subsidence have occurred and, therefore, that Sitkinak Island is not a persistent rupture boundary."

Geologic evidence of a sudden uplift and an extensive sand sheet are consistent with Russian accounts of an earthquake and tsunami in 1788, but prior to this study no geologic evidence of this great event had been found.

"The 1788 rupture had important consequences for Kodiak Island because it resulted in evacuation of the Russian outpost at Three Saints Bay (near Old Harbor) and resettlement at the present site of Kodiak (city)," said Briggs.  "Historical documents and our geologic observations suggest the 1788 earthquake ruptured offshore Kodiak and extended toward the Shumagin Islands rather than toward Anchorage."

Mapping prehistoric earthquakes in subduction zones requires a combination of approaches to indirectly capture evidence of massive undersea ruptures. Land-level changes and tsunami inundation—commonly recorded as raised or downdropped coasts and extensive sand sheets—can be revealed by mapping, coring, microfossil analysis, and a variety of dating techniques.

These findings have implications for hazard maps and tectonics studies, the study authors emphasized.  An upcoming update of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps for Alaska will require a reevaluation of fault rupture histories.

"Understanding the ways faults have ruptured in the past is important because the paleoearthquake record gives us at least one set of scenarios to prepare for in the future," said Briggs.  "Geologic information joins other critical data, such as seismological and geophysical observations, in helping us generate useful hazard models."

 

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, Alaska Earthquake Tsunami AGU Geophy..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Thursday, 27 Mar 2014 17:00
Summary: As a large pulse of water is being released into the former delta of the Colorado River along the U.S.-Mexico border, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are studying the effects on the environment as part of a historic, bi-national collaborative effort

Contact Information:

James Leenhouts ( Phone: 520-670-6671 X278 ); Jack Schmidt ( Phone: 928-556-7364 ); Jennifer LaVista ( Phone: 303-202-4764 );




As a large pulse of water is being released into the former delta of the Colorado River along the U.S.-Mexico border, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are studying the effects on the environment as part of a historic, bi-national collaborative effort. The pulse flow and the need to study its effects were agreed to as part of the recently adopted Minute 319 (PDF) to the 1944 US-Mexico Water Treaty.

Results from this study will be used to assist and inform future bi-national cooperative efforts as both countries work together to protect resources on both sides of the border. The now-dry Colorado River delta was once a thriving wetland ecosystem where water and sediment delivered from the Colorado River watershed reached the Gulf of California. A century ago, the Colorado River delta was navigable by large boats. Today, upstream diversions and dams in both countries control the Colorado River’s flow, and little to no water is released into the channel downstream of Morelos Dam.

This engineered release of water is the culmination of years of negotiations led by the U.S. and Mexican Sections of the International Boundary and Water Commission in partnership with the Department of the Interior, in conjunction with the seven U.S. Colorado River Basin states, Mexican government agencies, and a wide array of municipal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and universities from both the U.S. and Mexico. The release of water began on March 23 and will continue for about eight weeks, with the rate of release peaking today, March 27. Over this period of time, 105,392 acre feet of water will be released, a volume that would fill about 52,000 Olympic sized swimming pools.   

"This engineered pulse of water represents a truly unique scientific opportunity and is a wonderful example of a balanced approach to both conserve water and enhance fragile ecosystems," said Assistant Secretary of the Interior Anne Castle, who oversees the work of the USGS. "Linking scientists from Mexico and the United States will advance our understanding of environmental restoration opportunities along the Colorado River border and Delta,” she said. “While none of our agencies could take on this challenge alone, by partnering with experts in both countries, we are able to share information that will serve as a foundation for future cooperative efforts between our two nations."

"The USGS is honored to participate in this bi-national collaborative effort to understand the ecosystem effects of the pulse flow," said Suzette Kimball, Acting USGS Director. "These results will not only help inform decisions about potential future flows, but will also advance cooperative management efforts to improve the health of the delta region in both the U.S. and Mexico."

Minute 319 to the 1944 US-Mexico Water Treaty calls for studying the hydrologic and biologic effects of the pulse flow. Scientists from the USGS, the University of Arizona, the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, and other institutions are working along a 24-mile long river segment of the Colorado River where one bank is in Arizona and the other is in Baja California, Mexico.

Research and monitoring will focus on understanding how the water moves through the Colorado River channel, how the pulse changes as it moves downstream and infiltrates through the streambed into the groundwater, evaluating sediment erosion and deposition, and patterns of new vegetation establishment. Studying these factors will help provide an understanding of why vegetation is able to thrive in some areas and not in others and information to inform decisions about future environmental flows. In addition, remote sensing technology will be used along the length of the Colorado River delta to complement on-the-ground observations.  

Recognizing the challenges facing the Colorado River Basin, including a 14-year period of historic drought, Minute 319 was executed on Nov. 20, 2012. It provides for measures to enhance sharing of water supplies, permit Mexico to defer delivery of  some of its allotted water in the United States, facilitate investment in Mexico’s water infrastructure, and measure the ecosystem effects of one experimental environmental pulse flow. The pulse flow is thus a critically important element of Minute 319—a component that both countries agreed to implement this spring.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, International U.S. Mexico hydrology ..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 26 Mar 2014 17:21
Summary: The public and media are invited to attend a free conference about critical South Dakota water issues on April 9 in Rapid City. The John T. Loucks Distinguished Lecturer, Dr. Thomas Loveland of the U.S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center, will deliver “Landsat 8: A Sharper Eye in the Sky” during the luncheon. The lead-off keynote speaker, Michael Campana of Oregon State University, will present “Integrated Water-Resources Management—The Emperor’s New Clothes or Indispensable Process?”

Contact Information:

Janet Carter ( Phone: 6053943215 ); Mark T. Anderson ( Phone: 6053943220 );




The public and media are invited to attend a free conference about critical South Dakota water issues on April 9 in Rapid City. The John T. Loucks Distinguished Lecturer, Dr. Thomas Loveland of the U.S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center, will deliver “Landsat 8: A Sharper Eye in the Sky” during the luncheon. The lead-off keynote speaker, Michael Campana of Oregon State University, will present “Integrated Water-Resources Management—The Emperor’s New Clothes or Indispensable Process?”

 

The 12th annual Western South Dakota Hydrology Meeting will allow a variety of scientists, students, and other interested individuals to meet and exchange ideas, discuss mutual issues, and present the results of studies. Sessions include presentations about in-situ mining, water-resources management, ecosystems, climate, groundwater, and erosion.  

 

WHAT:           12th annual Western South Dakota Hydrology Meeting

 

WHEN:           Wed. April 9, 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

 

WHERE:        Rushmore Plaza Civic Center

                    444 N. Mount Rushmore Rd., Rapid City MAP              

DETAILS:      Free to the public and students with an optional $20 lunch. Professional registration fees are $100. For engineers who wish to obtain credit for professional development, credits are available for technical sessions attended.

REGISTER:   All attendees, including students and the general public, are asked to register before April 2 by visiting the conference website or by contacting Janet Carter at 605-394-3215 or jmcarter@usgs.gov.

The annual conference typically draws more than 350 attendees. Additional details regarding the preliminary program are available from the conference website.

The conference is organized by the USGS, South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, South Dakota Engineering Society, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, and West Dakota Water Development District.

For additional information about the USGS water-resources studies in South Dakota visit the USGS South Dakota Water Science Center home page.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, Water SouthDakota PublicLecture EROS..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Wednesday, 26 Mar 2014 13:44
Summary: The U.S. Geological Survey will award up to $5 million in grants for earthquake hazards research in 2015. 

Applications due May 22, 2014

Contact Information:

Elizabeth Lemersal ( Phone: 703-648-6701 ); Jessica Robertson ( Phone: 703-648-6624 );




The U.S. Geological Survey will award up to $5 million in grants for earthquake hazards research in 2015. 

“The grants offered through the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program are an established and long-standing effort that have proven to be a success every year, with talented, scientific applicants who significantly contribute to the advancement of earthquake research,” said Bill Leith, USGS Senior Science Advisor for Earthquake and Geologic Hazards. “Every year we are rewarded by innovative proposals from across the country, so we encourage the continued submission of new ideas to help earthquake science evolve and, ultimately, reduce earthquake losses.” 

Interested researchers can apply online at GRANTS.GOV under funding opportunity number G14AS00036. Applications are due May 22, 2014. 

Each year the USGS awards earthquake hazards research grants to universities, state geological surveys, and private institutions. Past projects included investigating the Central Virginia Seismic Zone to develop a better understanding of this active seismic zone; examining the paleoseismic record in the Prince William Sound area of Alaska to characterize earthquakes prior to the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 to better understand future earthquakes in this hazard-prone area; and using GPS to measure ground deformation in the greater Las Vegas area and provide information on how faults will rupture in large, damaging earthquakes. 

A complete list of funded projects and reports can be found on the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program external research support website.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "TA, NaturalHazards NaturalHazardsEarthqu..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Tuesday, 25 Mar 2014 13:00
Summary: Newly released US Topo maps  for Utah now feature a new commercial road data provider. The latest highway, road and street data from HERE has been added to the 1,476 revised US Topo quadrangles for the state. 

Contact Information:

Mark Newell, APR ( Phone: 573-308-3850 ); Larry Moore ( Phone: 303-202-4019 ); Bob Davis ( Phone: 573-308-3554 );




Newly released US Topo maps  for Utah now feature a new commercial road data provider. The latest highway, road and street data from HERE has been added to the 1,476 revised US Topo quadrangles for the state. 

"HERE, a Nokia business, is proud to provide fresh, robust and comprehensive map content to the State of Utah and the US Topo Maps program," said Roy Kolstad, VP Sales Enterprise Americas, HERE. "We are excited for users to experience the benefits HERE brings with our more than 25 years of experience in cartography, drawing on more than 80,000 sources of data." 

The new maps also include Public Land Survey System (PLSS). These data are added to the growing list of states west of the Mississippi River. PLSS is a way of subdividing and describing land in the United States. All lands in the public domain are subject to subdivision by this rectangular system of surveys, which is regulated by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Other selected states will begin getting PLSS map data during the next respective revision cycle

The new design for US Topo maps improves readability of maps for online and printed use, while retaining the look and feel of the traditional USGS topographic map. Map symbols are easy to read when the digital aerial photograph layer imagery is turned on.  

Other re-design enhancements and new features:

  • New shaded relief layer for enhanced view of the terrain
  • Military installation boundaries, post offices and cemeteries
  • New road classification
  • A slight screening (transparency) has been applied to some features to enhance visibility of multiple competing layers
  • New PDF legend attachment
  • Metadata formatted to support multiple browsers 

US Topo maps are created from geographic datasets in The National Map, and deliver visible content such as high-resolution aerial photography, which was not available on older paper-based topographic maps. The new US Topo maps provide modern technical advantages that support wider and faster public distribution and on-screen geographic analysis tools for users.

The new digital topographic maps are PDF documents with geospatial extensions (GeoPDF®) image software format and may be viewed using Adobe Reader, available as a no-cost download. 

US Topo maps are updated every three years. The initial round of the 48 conterminous state coverage was completed in September of 2012.  Hawaii and Puerto Rico maps have recently been added. More than 400 new US Topo maps for Alaska have been added to the USGS Map Locator & Downloader, but will take several years to complete the vast state. 

To download US Topo maps: http://nationalmap.gov/ustopo/

caption below caption below
March 2014 US Topo map of the Moab, Utah area, 1:24,000 scale. Orthoimage layer is turned on, contour and woodland layers turned off. (Larger image) 1885 historical USGS map of the Moab, Utah area, 1:250,000 scale.. (Larger image)
Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, CoreScienceSystemsNationalGeospatial..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 24 Mar 2014 16:00
Summary: MENLO PARK, Calif. — How much will California's climate warm in future decades and what are the greatest vulnerabilities to climate change? On March 27th, USGS Climate Researcher Dan Cayan will explain about how scientists are investigating the way climate change might impact resources that are crucial to the state, including the Sierra Nevada snowpack, California coastal sea levels and the San Francisco Bay and Delta. Find out how climatologists are using earth system physics and computer modeling to develop plausible scenarios of California’s changing climate. 

Free USGS Public Lecture March 27

Contact Information:

Leslie  Gordon ( Phone: 650-329-4006 );




 Image of the flyer.  All information on the flyer is included in the content.

MENLO PARK, Calif. — How much will California's climate warm in future decades and what are the greatest vulnerabilities to climate change? On March 27th, USGS Climate Researcher Dan Cayan will explain about how scientists are investigating the way climate change might impact resources that are crucial to the state, including the Sierra Nevada snowpack, California coastal sea levels and the San Francisco Bay and Delta. Find out how climatologists are using earth system physics and computer modeling to develop plausible scenarios of California’s changing climate. 

Who:

Dan Cayan, USGS Climate Researcher

What:

Slide-show-illustrated presentation: Preparing for California Climate Change: Climatologists Look Back and Peer Forward

When:

Thursday, March 27, 2014
12 p.m. —Lecture preview for USGS employees and news media representatives
7 p.m.—Public lecture open to all
(both presentations will be live-streamed over the Internet)

Where:

U.S. Geological Survey
Building 3 Auditorium, second floor
345 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

More info and directions:

USGS Evening Public Lecture Series
Menlo Park Campus Map
Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, water drought ClimateChange sierrane..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Date: Monday, 24 Mar 2014 13:34
Summary: The practice of emergency post-fire seeding in sagebrush landscapes of the Great Basin, which was meant to stabilize soils, has not resulted in restored habitats that would be used by greater sage-grouse according to U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Forest Service researchers who published their results today in the journal Ecosphere

Contact Information:

Susan Kemp ( Phone: 541-750-1047 ); David Pilliod ( Phone: 208-426-5202 );




BOISE — The practice of emergency post-fire seeding in sagebrush landscapes of the Great Basin, which was meant to stabilize soils, has not resulted in restored habitats that would be used by greater sage-grouse according to U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Forest Service researchers who published their results today in the journal Ecosphere.

The new study examined the habitat that was present 8-20 years after the seeding projects occurred. These aerial or rangeland drill seeding projects did not always include sagebrush seeds and were not intended to restore wildlife habitat, but instead were designed to mitigate the effects of fire on soil and vegetation. Yet they provide an opportunity to reverse habitat degradation for sage-grouse, a species being considered for protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Scientists first characterized which habitats and landscapes sage-grouse use throughout the Great Basin. Then they examined areas that had burned and were subsequently seeded with rangeland plant species between 1990 and 2003. To link the two phases of the study, the authors assessed whether vegetation conditions in rehabilitated areas were similar to the habitats used by sage-grouse.

The authors found that sage-grouse tend to use areas with a mixture of dwarf sagebrush and Wyoming big sagebrush, native grasses, minimal human development, and minimal non-native plants. This information will help land managers prioritize areas for protection from disturbance or areas for future sage-grouse specific restoration efforts.

"When we compared these vegetation and landscape conditions to those of post-wildfire rehabilitation sites, we found that the probability of sage-grouse using treated areas was low and not very different from burned areas that had not been treated," said USGS ecologist Robert Arkle, the lead author of the publication.

Sagebrush burning
This is sagebrush burning at Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in association with a management project located 65 miles northeast of Lakeview, OR.

Burned areas, whether treated or not, generally lacked shrubs even after 20 years, and in low elevation areas especially, non-native plants like cheatgrass were often too prevalent for burned sites to be used as sage-grouse habitat. This is important because it means that for at least 20 years following wildfire, burned areas of the Great Basin are not likely to be used by sage-grouse, regardless of emergency stabilization treatment. With this kind of time lag, a substantial amount of sage-grouse habitat is lost each year to wildfire, while gaining relatively little through natural plant succession or emergency stabilization treatments.

Published guidelines about what constitutes sage-grouse habitat also provided criteria for comparison to what the scientists observed in the seeded sites. Seeded areas met habitat guideline criteria for native grasses about half of the time, but the majority of seeding projects did not meet sagebrush or forb guideline criteria.

Some individual seeding projects did result in higher quality habitat and the authors evaluated the environmental conditions shared by these sites to determine where post-fire rehabilitation is more likely to benefit sage-grouse. Seeding projects that were most effective tended to occur in cool, moderately moist climates and also depended on post-treatment precipitation and surrounding landscape conditions.   

"This is part of a growing body of science demonstrating how difficult it is to rehabilitate sagebrush landscapes once native vegetation is lost through wildfire," said USGS ecologist David Pilliod, who co-authored the publication. "Restoration in the Great Basin is a huge challenge for land managers not only because of difficulties associated with reducing non-native plants and establishing natives, but also because of the rate at which landscapes with sagebrush and other native vegetation are lost. These habitat losses can have negative consequences for sage-grouse and other wildlife that depend on sagebrush."

The study found that even relatively small amounts of non-native plants and human development were both forms of habitat loss that affected whether sage-grouse would use particular locations.

Although these projects did not specifically target sage-grouse, they are important sage-grouse conservation opportunities, according to Arkle. This is because wildfires burn about one million acres each year in the Great Basin and 97 percent of the acres treated by these projects are in historic sage-grouse habitat.

This research was conducted in collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the Joint Fire Science Project. Funding was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Forest Service. The study, Quantifying restoration effectiveness using multi-scale habitat models- implications for sage-grouse in the Great Basin, published in Ecosphere is an offshoot of a larger effort to assess ecological outcomes of emergency stabilization and rehabilitation projects conducted by federal land managers in the Great Basin.

Author: "OC_Web@usgs.gov (Office of Communications and Publishing)" Tags: "PR, wildfire sage grouse Great Basin res..."
Send by mail Print  Save  Delicious 
Next page
» You can also retrieve older items : Read
» © All content and copyrights belong to their respective authors.«
» © FeedShow - Online RSS Feeds Reader